Henry M. Morris complete collection

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Ted Hans | Forum Activity | Posted: Sun, Jan 24 2010 1:09 PM
Henry M. Morris complete collection would make a good addition to the Logos library. I am missing some of his books that i am not aware of but i would like to see a complete collection of his works. Thanks.

    Ted      
  1. The Revelation Record: A Scientific and Devotional Commentary on the Prophetic Book of the End of Times by Henry M. Morris
  2. Remarkable Record of Job: The Ancient Wisdom, Scientific Accuracy, and Life-Changing Message of an Amazing Book by Henry M. Morris
  3. The Remarkable Journey of Jonah: A Scholarly, Conservative Study of His Amazing Record by Henry M. Morris
  4. The Long War Against God: The History and Impact of the Creation/Evolution Conflict by Henry M. Morris
  5. Biblical Creationism: What Each Book of the Bible Teaches About Creation & the Flood by Henry M. Morris
  6. Scientific Creationism by Henry M. Morris III
  7. The Bible Has the Answer by Henry M. Morris and Martin E. Clark
  8. Many Infallible Proofs: Evidences for the Christian Faith by Henry M. Morris and Henry M. Morris III
  9. Men of Science Men of God: Great Scientists of the Past Who Believed the Bible by Henry M. Morris
  10. The Beginning of the World: A Scientific Study of Genesis 1-11 by Henry M. Morris
  11. After Eden: Understanding Creation, the Curse, and the Cross by Henry Morris III, John Morris, and Henry M. Morris
  12. That Their Words May Be Used Against Them by Henry M. Morris
  13. The God Who Is Real by Henry M. Morris
  14. For Time And Forever by Henry M. Morris
  15. The Modern Creation Trilogy: Scripture and Creation, Science and Creation, Society and Creation by Henry M. Morris and John D. Morris
  16. Some Call It Science: The Religion of Evolution by Henry M. Morris
  17. Exploring the Evidence for Creation by Henry M. Morris
  18. When Christians Roamed the Earth by Henry M. Morris
  19. The Genesis Flood the Biblical Record and Its Scientific Implications by John C. Whitcomb jr and Henry M. Morris
  20. Days to Remember: Devotions for the Holidays Throughout the Year by Henry M. Morris
  21. Evolution and the Modern Christian by Henry M. Morris
  22. That You Might Believe by Henry M. Morris and Ph. D. Morris
  23. 5 Reasons to Believe in Recent Creation by Henry M. Morris III
  24. Sampling the Psalms: A Scientific & Devotional Study of Selected Psalms by Henry M. Morris
  25. A History of Modern Creationism by Henry M. Morris
  26. The Remarkable Birth of Planet Earth by Henry M. Morris
  27. Biblical Cosmology and Modern Science by Henry M. Morris
  28. STUDIES IN THE BIBLE AND SCIENCE or Christ and Creation by Henry M. Morris
  29. Men of Science, Men of God Great Scientists of the Past Who Believed in the Bible by Henry M Morris
  30. The God Who Is Real: A Creationist Approach to Evangelism and Missions by Henry M. Morris
  31. The Biblical Basis for Modern Science by Henry M. MORRIS

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Posts 102
Roger King | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jan 24 2010 3:51 PM

Ted Hans:
Henry M. Morris complete collection would make a good addition to the Logos library. I am missing some of his books that i am not aware of but i would like to see a complete collection of his works. Thanks.

+1  Yes Please!!!

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Matthew C Jones | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jan 24 2010 4:33 PM

Ted Hans:
Henry M. Morris complete collection would make a good addition to the Logos library.

 

YES!   I wish Logos could make Bro. Ted our new resources idea man. Every list you post is full of neat titles. Henry Morris is one author that is barely represented in Logos but one of the best in Creation Science writing.

The Genesis Record http://www.logos.com/ebooks/details/GENRECORD 

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Greg | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jan 24 2010 5:50 PM

Not sure if we can do this, but:

-1

 

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David Palmer | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jan 24 2010 6:24 PM

Great suggestion, I wouldn't hesitate to buy it.

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Alain Maashe | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jan 24 2010 7:51 PM

Greg Masone:

Not sure if we can do this, but:

-1

 

Greg,

If you do not like a book don't buy it.

 This is how the system works with a business like Logos that seeks to meet demand among its customers.

I don't think anything productive will be achieved if we start voting against books that others are proposing (it is even less productive when no rationale is presented).

Alain

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Greg | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jan 24 2010 11:03 PM

Alain, I guess we can't do this!  Must be another one of those unspoken rules everyone talks about, huh?  Wink

As I see it, voting for or against a series of books before they go into pre-pub allows Logos to gauge interest in the book. And I see no harm in letting one of my favorite companies know what's worth investing pre-pub resources into or not. While it may not happen as often on these forums, in the old newsgroups dissent over book suggestions was almost an everyday occurrence.

Other people on other suggestion boards have seen fit to leave a "+1" for their comment, also with no rationale, so I didn't see any harm in doing the same. Have you spoken to them about voting for something without any rationale given?

But if you are interested, I do not think Henry Morris would be a good addition to Logos because I've found his writings on scientific topics do not stand up well to scrutiny. I don't think its a good idea to propagate views that aren't true, just as I see no need to disseminate writings advocating geocentrism to people in the church.

While Mr. Morris' intentions were probably good, I consider the content of his writings misleading and harmful to a fulfilling view of God's creation. This is enough reason for me to add my negative vote to this suggestion.

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Alain Maashe | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jan 25 2010 12:15 AM

Greg,

I am afraid that it is your rationale that does not stand up well to scrutiny.

Let say for the sake of argument that your premise about the factual deficiency of Morris’ work is true

If your concern is that Logos not publish books that “propagate views that aren't true”, you should also voice your opposition to 1/3 or 2/3 of the books published by Logos (depending on where you fall on the theological spectrum).  This “test of truth” should not stop with the science behind Morris’ interpretation of Genesis; it should also extend to all areas of knowledge. It should lead to the elimination of some of introductions to the OT or the NT. Commentaries (Dunn and Carson should not both be published when it comes to Justification), journal articles, monographs, and so on… since all sides of the theological spectrum cannot factually be right and at least one side is wrong.

There is the problem of who decides who is right and who is wrong.

But,  I am reminded that Logos is not a Church but a business and as such does not endeavor to defend or propagate a set of views to the detriment of others.

Logos chooses books based on the positive interest expressed by its customers with the knowledge that not everyone will like or even consider buying a given resource.

A company decides to create a product based on the number of potential customers not based on the number of people that dislike the product. If the market is there, it does not matter a bit how many people do not like the product especially since one does not sell “negative” products. Despite my dislike for Macs and the great number of people who agree with me, Apple is still thriving and making Macs because the customer base is there and this is all that counts.   

If Logos needs 1,000 potential buyers to publish a book, what do you think would happen if 1,500 are in favor and 2,000 or even 10,000 are against it or not interested? The book will still be published because it meets the market requirements and the penalty for a company like Logos for publishing a book that some do not like is negligible to inexistent  

What you also fail to acknowledge is that publishing a book is not the same thing as endorsing it. Many of us desire to read books that do not line up with our theological beliefs and which make assertions that are considered false and misleading.  A customer doing work in apologetics and adopting a position contrary to that of Morris’ would nevertheless do well to acquire (or at least consult) the work in question so as to work from primary sources and know what he or she is talking about.

I could compare Logos to my seminary library, the school’s theological distinctive are clearly and uncompromisingly evangelical. However, when it comes to books in the library, the school strives to provide all representative works on a given topic regardless of whether or not they agree with the author’s theological stance or presentation and handling of the evidence. My school’s library would be a very poor library if it only had works that advocated “compatible” views.

 

I see Logos serving a similar purpose but instead of print volumes, the company is primarily dealing with digital volumes.

What is my point? There is room for Morris and YEC, there is room for Hugh Ross and OEC, just like there is room for works who advocate theistic evolution. They cannot be (and are not) all factually correct, but they serve different purposes for different people.

If money (and time) was not an issue for me, I would not mind having them all in my library as I transition to a digital library.  

Alain

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jan 25 2010 12:39 AM

Alain Maashe:
I could compare Logos to my seminary library, the school’s theological distinctive are clearly and uncompromisingly evangelical. However, when it comes to books in the library, the school strives to provide all representative works on a given topic regardless of whether or not they agree with the author’s theological stance or presentation and handling of the evidence. My school’s library would be a very poor library if it only had works that advocated “compatible” views.

I agree that a diverse collection is ideal. Many of the books recommended here are by individuals I have never heard of. But I think that your argument needs at least one more point. A seminary library retains a certain quality standard as well ... with perhaps a special purpose collection or two that falls below that standard. I this Logos is better served by relegating some books to the PBB world although with a handful of exceptions, I am not qualified to identify such books.

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Greg | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jan 25 2010 12:41 AM

Alain,

While I thank you for engaging my initial post, I kept it short and to the point for a reason. I was not interested in having this become something more than I had intended.

I have a right to voice my disagreement with suggested books, and there is a strong tradition among Logos customers of doing the same on the previous newsgroups.

While I'm sure you will persist in disagreeing with my post, I do hope you will extend to me the right to do the same towards the suggested books.

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Alain Maashe | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jan 25 2010 2:03 AM

MJ. Smith:

Alain Maashe:
I could compare Logos to my seminary library, the school’s theological distinctive are clearly and uncompromisingly evangelical. However, when it comes to books in the library, the school strives to provide all representative works on a given topic regardless of whether or not they agree with the author’s theological stance or presentation and handling of the evidence. My school’s library would be a very poor library if it only had works that advocated “compatible” views.

I agree that a diverse collection is ideal. Many of the books recommended here are by individuals I have never heard of. But I think that your argument needs at least one more point. A seminary library retains a certain quality standard as well ... with perhaps a special purpose collection or two that falls below that standard. I this Logos is better served by relegating some books to the PBB world although with a handful of exceptions, I am not qualified to identify such books.

 

MJ

As your own post acknowledges an objective identification of what is a not a “quality” work often proves to be a difficult task.

What is certain is that looking for “quality” works is not (and should not) the sole criteria used by a good library, equally important is to make available works that have been or are influential in the discussion regardless of what actual value the work has. This is why library carry books advocating theories that have been clearly discredited but were part of the debate concerning a given topic. Whatever one believes about Morris’ view, his work has been influential in the discussion and a proper discussion of the past and present  interpretation of Genesis from a scientific perspective cannot just overlook his body of work, even if it is solely because of the impact his has had at the popular level   

A business like Logos works according to similar principles. It seems to publish the top works in the field of religion (because of their financial and marketing potential) and it also seeks to satisfy the demand regardless of the perceived “quality” of the work. Quality (which is often in the eye of the beholder) does not necessarily pay the bills or create profit, satisfying demand in a cost effective way always does.

if you have any doubt about this principle at work, look at the pre-pubs and the speed of completion of the various resources.

Alain

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Alain Maashe | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jan 25 2010 2:37 AM

Greg Masone:

Alain,

While I thank you for engaging my initial post, I kept it short and to the point for a reason. I was not interested in having this become something more than I had intended.

I have a right to voice my disagreement with suggested books, and there is a strong tradition among Logos customers of doing the same on the previous newsgroups.

While I'm sure you will persist in disagreeing with my post, I do hope you will extend to me the right to do the same towards the suggested books.

Greg,

We are clearly not talking about the same thing. Here you are talking about what you have the right to do, while I was referring to what is productive, considerate, and less likely to rub someone the wrong way,

Many users and even Logos itself are trying to get rid of some of those "strong traditions among Logos customers" that were not necessary beneficial

 

I do not plan to purchase Morris' works and as such I am not advocating it for my own benefit, but I would not be pleased (to say the least) if I was trying to obtain some electronic books for my personal library of someone else was trying to deny me that opportunity instead of merely refusing to buy the works himself.

if one's negative vote has an impact of the final decision to publish a work , it would not be as inconsequential (on the composition of one's library) as merely disagreeing with someone's view.

I rest my case.

Alain

 

 

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Ted Hans | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jan 25 2010 5:20 AM

Greg Masone:

Not sure if we can do this, but:

-1

While it was not my intention to get into a debate on this subject i think i should respond.

Greg, you disagree with my choice of books suggestion and think it propagate views that aren't true. Believing that the content of Henry Morris's writings are misleading and harmful to a fulfilling view of God's creation. Why? On the grounds that evolution is a better explanation for the origin of the universe - see this thread http://community.logos.com/forums/t/7289.aspx?PageIndex=1 for your views.

Well, i disagree with the evolutionary explanation of things(origins) and John Bowling on the same thread above took you on, on your views. John did a good job interacting with your views and showing many of the false assumptions of the evolutionary theories and the science behind it. That exchange did not end well.

Right or wrong a lot of Christians disagree with your "scientific theories" and i hope you will not be militant about voting their views down even if you disagree with it. It (Henry Morris) is still within the bounds of Christian orthodoxy whereas the jury is still out on evolution. Let us agree to disagree on this, for me it is enough that God created the world in the space of six days and not billions upon billions of years( though i see you hold to a unique six day view which differs from others who believe in the same theory of evolution).

You are welcome to your theories but i fear your views will end up undermining and "attempting" to dethrone the God of the bible in the hearts of men/women who do not know him or who do know him. If Henry Morris does appear on the Pre-Pub page there is always the option of not buyingWink and in that you would not have lost anythingSmile.

I hope my response did not come across as being rude, if so it was not intended to be.

Ted

 

 

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Ted Hans | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jan 25 2010 5:55 AM

Hi Alain,

             Thanks again for your balanced approached on this issue. You have saved me the embarrassment of a full response. What can i say to your various post on this thread? I wish i could have put it as well as you did Star.

 

Ted

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George Somsel | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jan 25 2010 8:07 AM

Alain Maashe:

Greg Masone:

Alain,

While I thank you for engaging my initial post, I kept it short and to the point for a reason. I was not interested in having this become something more than I had intended.

I have a right to voice my disagreement with suggested books, and there is a strong tradition among Logos customers of doing the same on the previous newsgroups.

While I'm sure you will persist in disagreeing with my post, I do hope you will extend to me the right to do the same towards the suggested books.

 

Greg,

We are clearly not talking about the same thing. Here you are talking about what you have the right to do, while I was referring to what is productive, considerate, and less likely to rub someone the wrong way,

Many users and even Logos itself are trying to get rid of some of those "strong traditions among Logos customers" that were not necessary beneficial

 

I do not plan to purchase Morris' works and as such I am not advocating it for my own benefit, but I would not be pleased (to say the least) if I was trying to obtain some electronic books for my personal library of someone else was trying to deny me that opportunity instead of merely refusing to buy the works himself.

if one's negative vote has an impact of the final decision to publish a work , it would not be as inconsequential (on the composition of one's library) as merely disagreeing with someone's view.

I rest my case.

Alain 

I happen to agree with you that Logos should not be placed in the position of having to be selective with regard to positions of the authors (Yes, miracles do occassionally happen), but having said that, I think it is acceptable that someone express his dislike for a particular author.  It is not for the purpose of influencing Logos ("Let a thousand flowers bloom") but to call attention to the fact that an author may be less than what many would consider to be acceptable.  There are a few such books in Logos which I consider to be undesirable, but if someone wishes to clutter up his library and mind with them, it's on his head.  I'll give one example which hopefully is not too controversial:  Thayer's Greek Lexicon is hopelessly outdated since it was written before the discovery of the Oxyrhynchus Papyri which taught us that the Greek of the NT was not a special "Holy Ghost Greek" but was the Greek of the average person of the time.  Thayer may be of use if one wishes to have it to show the differences between then and now, but if he is using it as his main lexicon -- Oy Vey !

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Greg | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jan 25 2010 12:48 PM

Alain, 

I understand your argument, but knowing the audience of Logos Bible Software, I think Morris' work would be used not for any historical research, but for bolstering a set of outdated 20th century ideas about the universe and the Bible. As the debate on origins continues to move in the opposite direction of Morris' work, I see no need in letting his ideas and inaccuracies continue on. Withdraw the life-support, I say, and let them die in print. To mirror George, if anyone is using him as his main research on origins -- Oy Vey !

As I have said before, thank you for engaging what I have written, but please allow me the same liberty that you exercise when disagreeing with my suggestion.

Ted,

Thank you for responding and bringing up that thread from a month ago! I don't think it took place in the way you described it though. There were several members berating and calling me names for my stated position, and only one who actually offered evidence to the contrary. I explained how it wasn't good evidence and and showed why, and it was dropped from later discussion. The forum user you mentioned asked to continue the discussion on his blog, which I did, only to find out that he likes to delete replies and leave only his remaining. Not exactly what I consider honest behavior.

If you consider those actions commendable, I would be hesitant to discuss anything regarding origins with you. Yet, since integrity is important to me, I do not alter the replies of whomever I am speaking to when it happens on my own turf. Since this post is about a suggestion of books, I do not think this is the place to have that discussion. If you wish to discuss origins, find me on Facebook under my current name and we can do so. You can even go first.

 

To be frank, I find the reaction to my little "-1" completely over the top and ridiculous. Ted, you made this personal when you replied to me, and I think that was uncalled for. I should not have to defend my integrity simply because I don't agree with your book suggestion. Alain, I don't understand how you have the liberty to disagree and I do not. Quantity is good, quality is even better, but discernment is the ideal. Please forgive me for making mine public.

Good day to you all, and I hope we can move on now.

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Ted Hans | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jan 25 2010 1:48 PM

Greg Masone:
I understand your argument, but knowing the audience of Logos Bible Software, I think Morris' work would be used not for any historical research, but for bolstering a set of outdated 20th century ideas about the universe and the Bible. As the debate on origins continues to move in the opposite direction of Morris' work, I see no need in letting his ideas and inaccuracies continue on. Withdraw the life-support, I say, and let them die in print. To mirror George, if anyone is using him as his main research on origins -- Oy Vey !

Hmmm .... interesting taken on things!No Stick out tongueBig Smile

Greg Masone:
To be frank, I find the reaction to my little "-1" completely over the top and ridiculous. Ted, you made this personal when you replied to me, and I think that was uncalled for.

Sorry, you took my response to be personal it was not meant to be. If you read my post i said that in another word about not being rude. The irony is i find your response to my response as your comments aboveSmile. Okay, take it easy point taken it was uncalled for.

Greg Masone:
If you consider those actions commendable, I would be hesitant to discuss anything regarding origins with you. Yet, since integrity is important to me, I do not alter the replies of whomever I am speaking to when it happens on my own turf. Since this post is about a suggestion of books, I do not think this is the place to have that discussion. If you wish to discuss origins, find me on Facebook under my current name and we can do so. You can even go first.

I mentioned John's interactions with your views(John did actually, indeed interact with your views- no misrepresentation on my part), which i believe was good and i did not mention anything about anyone deleting anyone's post. It seems you are reading more into my comments than is warranted.

I don't mind having a chat with you on origins but to be frank with you i don't ever see myself buying into the evolution theory. My simple take on origins is, God created the world out of nothing. This is not a scientific question to me but one of theology, exegesis & the proper interpretation of scripture.

I agree with you, this is not the place to discuss it.

Every blessings,

Ted.

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Larry Heflin | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jan 25 2010 2:16 PM

I'd love to see Morris's works in Logos. I'm hopelessly unenlightened and will no doubt die in my ignorance.

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jan 25 2010 3:56 PM

Meanwhile, on another thread a position was called heretical - leading to a caution against a particular author and a particular book. In that case, I saw no sign that the denominational identification to support the term "heretical" was ever made. In that case, the author was not called to task. As I recall my Jewish logic as exhibited by Paul, that justifies the conclusion that the post of -1 was insufficient to justify this discussion. So can we simply say someone stated their opinion in a mode appropriate to a respectful living room conversation and drop it?

 

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Matthew C Jones | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jan 25 2010 4:16 PM

MJ. Smith:
I agree that a diverse collection is ideal. Many of the books recommended here are by individuals I have never heard of. But I think that your argument needs at least one more point. A seminary library retains a certain quality standard as well ... with perhaps a special purpose collection or two that falls below that standard.

Master's Seminary has lots of anti-Calvinistic writings in their library. They would even deem them lower quality because of their stance. But they see it is a positive thing to lay out for examination, consideration & refutation. The most vocal detractors against certain controversial subjects seem to be those who are afraid of the other side being correct. I just love it when the representative spokesperson my opponents put forth in the debate is incompetent. I have won debate points I was not even correct on because the other side did not know their material. Alexander Campbell would slay his debate opponents to the point they refused to engage him further, not because he was correct but because he was so eloquent in presenting his position. (Although I think he was frequently correct too. Smile)

But when somebody comes in with the No it only associates them with previous posters who went all-out against "too many Catholic works" or sacred namers (who contend we are all hell-bound for believing in the name of "JESUS") I just want to be allowed to read (& think) for myself. If I wanted somebody to think for me I wouldn't have a library at all.

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