[resolved] I have a question but don't know the right terminologies. So be patient with me!

Page 1 of 1 (8 items)
This post has 7 Replies | 1 Follower

Posts 194
KPK | Forum Activity | Posted: Wed, Apr 22 2015 11:09 AM

I want to learn to study the Word more. My goal is to read the bible and study the context of it. I don't want to just read it, nod my head and say I'm done. I want to read it, find the root words, the meaning of the passage, and understand the depth of it. 

 I want to learn more about expository and exegetical, not sure if I'm using these terms correctly. So my question to you is, within the software is there any way for me to read the bible exegetically? Do I need to purchase a expository bible? Exegetical bible? Is there such a thing? 

I understand that we have the exegetical guide within the software and I tried reading my bible using that. It's a little awkward.  
Please help.  Thank you.

Posts 806
Lew Worthington | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Apr 22 2015 5:01 PM

In addition to what Fredc suggested, I would like to throw this out there:

https://www.logos.com/product/37665/inductive-bible-study-a-comprehensive-guide-to-the-practice-of-hermeneutics

I wasn't even aware of this book until the OP's question came up, but Traina's book, on which the above one is based, played an important role in my career path. It might be worth careful consideration.

Posts 18854
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Apr 22 2015 5:21 PM

Hi KPK,

Perhaps it would help if we explain what the words exegetical (from exegesis) and expository mean.

Exegesis is a careful word-by-word unpacking of what a passage means, especially what it meant in the original context when it was written. (And hermeneutics is essentially linking that exegetical understanding from then to now; i.e., interpreting what the passage means to us in our day.)

Expository usually has to do with preaching, or exposition (detailed explanation) of a passage. So The Expositor's Bible is one aimed at preachers who do expository preaching. It certainly isn't wrong for laypeople to want to understand the Bible at the depth that a preacher would, but the purpose in approaching it might be different for a preacher than for you.

In addition to the books Fred and Lew have recommended, I would like to recommend:

How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth (the new 4th edition is in pre-pub for even less, but you'd have to wait to get it) and How to Read the Bible Book By Book, both by Gordon Fee and Douglas Stuart.

Keep in mind that seminaries teach exegesis over the course of an entire semester (or more) in intensive classes, so don't expect to be doing it well right away. Take your time over it and learn the skills bit-by-bit over the years ahead. You'll get better at it the more you read and learn and practice. And also in seminary they teach the biblical languages, which takes exegesis to a whole new level of depth. You can do a lot of that without knowing the languages, but knowing how to use the language features in Logos. Faithlife (Logos) sells some training videos called Learn to Use Biblical Greek and Hebrew with Logos Bible Software which you can work your way through. An updated version of that course, to go with Logos 6, is in pre-pub now for much less (but again, you'd have to wait for it to be completed).

Posts 4835
David Paul | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Apr 22 2015 8:02 PM

I would recommend bidding on the Lexham Methods series in CP. These four resources provide introductions to the various methods that Bible scholars have been implementing in their approaches to studying Scripture for the last 150 years or so. I would say that at least 50% and perhaps much more of what Logos sells is written by authors using at least one or more of these methods as their foundational starting point, for better or worse. To understand where Bible scholars are coming from, it is immeasurably helpful to know what their methods are for studying and interpreting Scripture. These books will give you a great foundation in understanding these methods.

Just to be clear, I'm not advocating any of them as being right and good (or wrong and bad), just saying that you won't "get" what scholars are trying to convey if you don't comprehend their foundational starting points.

I recommend you place a $50 dollar bid--there is a decent chance it will close for a lower price and you would pay that price. These books are well worth $12.50 each--imo, they are well worth $20-25 apiece.

Posts 225
Alex Bui | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Apr 23 2015 8:18 AM

I found the following resources are very helpful in my Bible study:

https://www.logos.com/product/46346/mobile-ed-bi100-learn-to-study-the-bible

I have a paper copy of an older edition, and it is very helpful:

https://www.logos.com/product/50318/how-to-read-the-bible-for-all-its-worth-fourth-edition

I really wish Faithlife has an intensive course on how to use Logos 6 to study the Bible likes this product:

http://www.learnlogos.com/category_s/1517.htm

May be Faithlife could develop or [edit: talk to John to] bring it in like MP courses.  I would buy it with the update of Logos 6 features. 

Posts 648
Into Grace | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Apr 23 2015 9:21 AM

Rosie Perera:
  

  I would like to recommend:

How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth (the new 4th edition is in pre-pub for even less, but you'd have to wait to get it) and How to Read the Bible Book By Book, both by Gordon Fee and Douglas Stuart.

Keep in mind that seminaries teach exegesis over the course of an entire semester (or more) in intensive classes, so don't expect to be doing it well right away. Take your time over it and learn the skills bit-by-bit over the years ahead. You'll get better at it the more you read and learn and practice. And also in seminary they teach the biblical languages, which takes exegesis to a whole new level of depth. You can do a lot of that without knowing the languages, but knowing how to use the language features in Logos. Faithlife (Logos) sells some training videos called Learn to Use Biblical Greek and Hebrew with Logos Bible Software which you can work your way through. An updated version of that course, to go with Logos 6, is in pre-pub now for much less (but again, you'd have to wait for it to be completed).

Yes

Thanks Rosie.

KPR,

You are after the "then and there" first. You want to draw out (not read in) the intent of the original authors. If God's Word was a well, you would want to draw pure water out and not pollute it with held theology, overlays, etc. 

Posts 194
KPK | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Apr 23 2015 10:15 AM

Thank you everyone for the resources! I will look at them. 
I'm already doing a inductive bible study. Have been doing it for years. I will look at these books and see which is best! I love the training videos! I might learn a lot from those! 

Page 1 of 1 (8 items) | RSS