How do you use Logos for inductive Bible study?

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Tes | Forum Activity | Posted: Fri, Jun 19 2015 5:55 AM

I could understand that everyone has his own way of using Logos for Bible study. It would be very helpful to learn from others how they use Logos as a tool for Inductive Bible study.

Blessings in Christ.

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Erwin Stull, Sr. | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 19 2015 6:35 AM

Tes:

I could understand that everyone has his own way of using Logos for Bible study. It would be very helpful to learn from others how they use Logos as a tool for Inductive Bible study.

Hi Tes;

I'm glad that you asked, as I am interested in this also. Smile

The way that I use Logos during Inductive Bible Study is that after I went through a few of Kay Arthur's free inductive web studies, I found a course (webinar) that John Fallahee (LearnLogos) had offered (and still does) and took that.

I created a set of inductive highlighting symbols and added them to the ones that are already in Logos. I pretty much follow the method that Kay Arthur teaches, using the Logos methods that John has taught,

The major drawback I ran into is creating the additional symbol. It becomes a nuisance when your in the study process and have to stop and create a new symbol, but once you create them, you have them.

Additional ideas are always good. Smile

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Rich DeRuiter | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 19 2015 10:01 AM

Tes:

I could understand that everyone has his own way of using Logos for Bible study. It would be very helpful to learn from others how they use Logos as a tool for Inductive Bible study.

I create inductive Bible studies for the small group Bible studies I lead. What I do is look at the text and begin to ask questions. For example, when there is a place named in the story, I'll ask them "Where is that?" or "How far is that from [where they were previously]?" When we come across people or nations we'd encountered previously, I'll have them briefly review that encounter. When something unusual or dramatic happens I may ask them "How would you feel, if that happened to you?" One interesting question to ask is "Why do you think God did that (or allowed that to happen)?" along with "Why do you suppose this is even in the Bible; what are we supposed to get from this?"

In other words I ask both factual and theoretical questions and try to get them to engage both intellectually and emotionally. I try to find ways of getting others to discover for themselves the hidden jewels right in front of them. Not everything is available to them however, so occasionally I'll supplement the lesson with other background material (for example, cultural background) that gives the proper context for what we're looking at.

I use Logos to help me see where the important issues and questions are (textual, theological, historical, etc), by reviewing both the texts (in multiple translations and original languages), and commentaries the sometimes point out issues I'd missed, or let me know I'm off target on what I'm thinking. I also assume I'll need to know far more than what I'm planning to emphasize, but most of that comes from a lifetime of learning (not just the preparation for a specific lesson).

Leading an inductive Bible study is a bit like playing improvisational music. You really have to know your stuff! And you have to be able to adapt and adjust as the discussion moves forward. But I love it!

Somewhere I was told that people remember 20% of what they're told and 80% of what they discover. That tells me that helping folks discover is the best way to help them learn.

 Help links: WIKI;  Logos 6 FAQ. (Phil. 2:14, NIV)

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Kellie Fontaine | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 22 2018 5:25 AM

How do you create your own markups?

Posts 283
Lonnie Spencer | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 22 2018 6:57 AM

Rich DeRuiter:

Tes:

I could understand that everyone has his own way of using Logos for Bible study. It would be very helpful to learn from others how they use Logos as a tool for Inductive Bible study.

I create inductive Bible studies for the small group Bible studies I lead. What I do is look at the text and begin to ask questions. For example, when there is a place named in the story, I'll ask them "Where is that?" or "How far is that from [where they were previously]?" When we come across people or nations we'd encountered previously, I'll have them briefly review that encounter. When something unusual or dramatic happens I may ask them "How would you feel, if that happened to you?" One interesting question to ask is "Why do you think God did that (or allowed that to happen)?" along with "Why do you suppose this is even in the Bible; what are we supposed to get from this?"

In other words I ask both factual and theoretical questions and try to get them to engage both intellectually and emotionally. I try to find ways of getting others to discover for themselves the hidden jewels right in front of them. Not everything is available to them however, so occasionally I'll supplement the lesson with other background material (for example, cultural background) that gives the proper context for what we're looking at.

I use Logos to help me see where the important issues and questions are (textual, theological, historical, etc), by reviewing both the texts (in multiple translations and original languages), and commentaries the sometimes point out issues I'd missed, or let me know I'm off target on what I'm thinking. I also assume I'll need to know far more than what I'm planning to emphasize, but most of that comes from a lifetime of learning (not just the preparation for a specific lesson).

Leading an inductive Bible study is a bit like playing improvisational music. You really have to know your stuff! And you have to be able to adapt and adjust as the discussion moves forward. But I love it!

Somewhere I was told that people remember 20% of what they're told and 80% of what they discover. That tells me that helping folks discover is the best way to help them learn.

I think the whole thing behind "inductive bible study"- as Rich has described and what Dr. Mike H. said in his Learn Hebrew webinar class- is to "Get you to think" Logos cannot teach you how to think (at least not yetWink) but it sure can facilitate thinking. Like Rich has pointed out- when you are asking questions of the text, then you are thinking.  

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Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 22 2018 11:26 AM

Kellie Fontaine:

How do you create your own markups?

Welcome Big Smile

Thread => more inductive symbols discussion includes many screen shots.

Thread => TIP: singular or plural pronoun? (visual filter) has some more markup ideas.

Keep Smiling Smile

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