Calling Greek Scholars

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James Thompson | Forum Activity | Posted: Sat, Jan 30 2010 1:41 PM

I'm using a text comparison tab for identifying differences in the greek text when I look at certain scriptures:

I use the NA27 because it's the version I use predominately now; Stephens' because I grew up on the KJV and it's the base text for that version; the BYZ because it represents the majority of greek texts and the UBS4 because it's the critical (scholar's) text -- don't really expect it to vary from the NA27 so there might be some redundancy there.

I think I've captured the main lines of greek text by using the representatives above. Any others you'd add to that list? I tried using TENTGM but got some weird results. Thanks in advance for your comments!

 

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Kevin Becker | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 30 2010 1:45 PM

UBS 4 doesn't vary from NA27. NA27 is the critical scholar text (because of its apparatus) and the USB is aimed at translators, its apparatus only has significan textual variances. There are some places where the punctuation is slightly different between the two but that's about it. Unless you want to get into dealing with variant readings offered up from an apparatus, you have a good setup already.

Disclaimer: not a Greek scholar, just a seminary grad.

Posts 221
James Thompson | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 30 2010 2:12 PM

Kevin Becker:

Disclaimer: not a Greek scholar, just a seminary grad.

I pretty much agree with you. The USB4 is redundant and while there are some differences I'm not trying to be that detailed. And, no disclaimer is necessary, I'm no scholar either... the more I study greek the more "unscholarly" I feel!  Surprise

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Rick Brannan (Faithlife) | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 30 2010 2:23 PM

Hi James.

Instead of Stephen's TR, I'd use Scrivener's Textus Receptus. Scrivener's work was done specifically to try to historically recreate the sources behind the KJV NT text.

In Logos4, the preferred edition of Scrivener's text is "The New Testament in Greek (Scrivener 1881)". (http://www.logos.com/ebooks/details/SCRMORPH).

[Disclaimer: I'm not a Greek scholar, but I play one on the internet.]

Rick Brannan
Data Wrangler, Faithlife
My books in print

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Anthony H | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jun 14 2010 7:07 PM

Rick Brannan:

Hi James.

Instead of Stephen's TR, I'd use Scrivener's Textus Receptus. Scrivener's work was done specifically to try to historically recreate the sources behind the KJV NT text.

In Logos4, the preferred edition of Scrivener's text is "The New Testament in Greek (Scrivener 1881)". (http://www.logos.com/ebooks/details/SCRMORPH).

[Disclaimer: I'm not a Greek scholar, but I play one on the internet.]

Is there a source that has or is an attempt to recreate Erasmus'' text? Or is Scrivener the closest?

Posts 64
John Calvin Hall | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jun 14 2010 8:07 PM

I would love it if Logos would invest some time and energy in building up Traditional Text.  Several years ago, I had the opportunity to view Erasmus' (5th Edition?) Text.  I would love to have a copy in my Logos 4 Library.  But while Logos is providing great resources for the ministry, they themselves are a business, and must prioritize resources not as a ministry but as a business which is understandable.

BTW - What makes a Greek Scholar?  Tenure at some ivy league?  Having written a popular book?  Being patted on the back by some other famous Greek Scholar?   BAH!   A Greek Scholar is one who has dedicated their lives to the study of Greek, as one who has dedicated their lives to studying the Bible is a Bible Scholar.

 

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jun 14 2010 9:56 PM

John Calvin Hall:
BTW - What makes a Greek Scholar?

As my French-Greek mother-in-law would say "First, be born in Greece". While I agree that educational background and publications do not make one a scholar, there are a number of people who have dedicated their lives in pursuit of Greek (or some other discipline) who have never become scholars in the field. To me, a scholar is one who has learned to question the "received" knowledge in a disciplined way. An educated person, in contrast, may have only learned to parrot back the "received" knowledge.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 653
Alex Scott | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jun 14 2010 10:26 PM

I set up something similar some time ago for the very same purpose.  For my fourth one though I chose the Greek New Testament According to the Majority Text.  While I'm not a big fan of the Majority text, it does provide some interesting differences.

Longtime Logos user (more than $30,000 in purchases) - now a second class user because I won't pay them more every month or year.

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