Help massive & complete Encyclopedia on CP to production!

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Unix | Forum Activity | Posted: Fri, Oct 23 2015 6:29 PM

Famous 1911 Edition https://www.logos.com/product/33266/encyclopedia-britannica

High bids are what matter! Significantly higher would be needed! 
Reasons for bidding:

  • Highly valued and sought for by antiquarians around the World.
  • This is the Edition where they paid attention to English language and article style - how well-written the articles should be.
  • Pre-Word War I (just before).
  • Much of the content not as conservative as many other Editions. But it's early 20th Century, so contrast to today!
  • History-interest material instead of focusing on and thinking that our present age is the best. We've advanced in many things, yet many other things were different in the past, our (free-)time was consumed in a different way in the past, for example: we didn't have access to entertainment in the same way (nor did we as children have toys made from advanced materials) but we didn't expect technological entertainment in the past. True. some things were harder to do, and because of the use of coal in industries and railways some countries didn't pollute that much less in the 19th century than today, but altogether the difference between our time and theirs is so big that it's often hard to fathom.
  • A multi-faceted wealth of entries.
  • Product will be delivered as advertised.
  • Have a look at the number of pages and see that higher bids than the going bid are motivated! They are large volumes - I've seen it in a university library! Don't You want content?

Faithlife should raise the going bid for this resource!
I dream about old encyclopedias every night now.

Aply!
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Posts 1426
Wild Eagle | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 23 2015 7:56 PM

If newer one goes for $100, I doubt there would be enough people willing to pay higher for the old one

"No man is greater than his prayer life. The pastor who is not praying is playing; the people who are not praying are straying." Leonard Ravenhill 

Posts 789
Lew Worthington | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 23 2015 8:00 PM

Wild Eagle:

If newer one goes for $100, I doubt there would be enough people willing to pay higher for the old one

Old encyclopedias always make me feel sad: All this writing with so little relevance. It's an odd reaction, I know. And others no doubt find lots of value in them.

Posts 8967
RIP
Matthew C Jones | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 23 2015 9:00 PM

Wild Eagle:

If newer one goes for $100, I doubt there would be enough people willing to pay higher for the old one

I would pay twice as much for the 1911 edition as I did for the 2015 edition.

This article summarizes a few reasons why.


""As the 
last sets of the Encyclopedia Britannica prepare to sink into obscurity, there's one edition that will always remain a collector's item: the 11th.

Published between 1910 and 1911, the 11th edition continues to inspire a religious reverence from its loyal adherents. The siren call of its 28 leather-bound volumes works a subtle magic on antiquarians, historians, booksellers, and scholars around the world.

So, why the appeal? AJ Jacobs, an American journalist, read his way through the entirety of the 15th edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica published in 2002. He wrote about his experience in the well-received book The Know-It-All: One Man's Humble Quest to Become the Smartest Person in the World. I spoke with Jacobs about the lasting appeal of the 11th. He said that "compared to more modern editions, reading the 11th is like reading a Faulkner novel instead of an instruction manual."

The 11th is exceptionally well written, the first encyclopedia where readability was courted in addition to scholarship. But its durability goes deeper than that.

Jacobs continued, "I think Hans Koning of the New Yorker nailed the appeal 30 years ago. He said it was the last great work of the age of reason, the final instance when all human knowledge could be presented with a single point of view. Four years later, the confidence and optimism that had produced the 11th would be, as he puts it, 'a casualty in the slaughter at Ypres and the Argonne.'"

And he's right. To open an 11th edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica is to open a worldview lost forever in the staggering slaughter of the first world war. The 11th edition of the Britannica represents the high tide of optimism and belief in human progress that had dominated the Anglo-Saxon vision since the Enlightenment.

Unabashed optimism – and unabashed racism – pervades many entries in the 11th, and provide its defining characteristics. The Edwardian world was finely ordered in the way an encyclopedia needs the world to be finely ordered: everything, and everyone, in their place. Interpreted for you by the rich, the white, and the expensively educated.

The entry on antisemitism states that it is "a passing phase in the history of culture". This was written 30 years before the horrors of Nazi Germany. The Vietnamese are the "worst-built and ugliest of all the Indo-Chinese," while the Chinese are "inferior in character" to Europeans. Arabs are noted for a propensity to be "cruel" and "crafty," and Africans "appear to stand on a lower evolutionary plane than the white man".

Despite its occasional ugliness, the reputation of the 11th persists today because of the staggering depth of knowledge contained with its volumes. It is especially strong in its biographical entries. These delve deeply into the history of men and women prominent in their eras who have since been largely forgotten – except by the historians, scholars, and antiquarian booksellers who champion the 11th for this quality.

It's among antiquarian booksellers that the 11th enjoys its highest reputation. Norman Kane, an American rare book dealer of over 50 years experience, only recently parted ways with his 11th, and that decision was a reluctant result of a cross-country move. "The [index] is full of names that resonate in all fields of the arts and sciences. People whose books we sell every day. More recent editions have lost, I believe, much of the antiquarian flavour that recommends it to us. We are after all more interested in the out-of-date than in the up-to-date."

Among those resonating names are TH HuxleyAlfred North Whitehead,Algernon Swinburne and Peter Kropotkin. Fifteen hundred men and an impressive (by Edwardian standards) 200 women contributed articles to the 11th edition, which was edited by Hugh Chisholm. Under his editorship, the Britannica combined scholarship and readability in a way no previous encyclopedia ever had – and, arguably, no encyclopedia has been able to repeat. Chisholm also revolutionised encyclopedia publishing by releasing the first 14 volumes in the autumn of 1910 and the second 14 volumes, along with an index, in the spring of 1911. The volumes in previous editions were released as they were completed, with years passing between publication of the first and final volumes. Under the new model, the entire Britannica was assembled before crucial articles went out of date.

With the publication of the final volumes of the 11th, in the spring of 1911, came the last stand of the Enlightenment. One year later the Titanic would strike an iceberg. Three years later, Franz Ferdinand was assassinated. Five years later, a staggering 1.25m people would die in the Battle of the Somme. And the world would never be the same.

When viewed in that light, the worn leather volumes of the 11th acquire an almost mythic quality. Its pages contain all the knowledge of a world on the brink of deep and everlasting change. And that is why the 11th edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica will outlast all the others."

         --from http://www.theguardian.com/books/booksblog/2012/apr/10/encyclopedia-britannica-11th-edition 

Logos 7 Collectors Edition

Posts 8941
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Bruce Dunning | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Oct 24 2015 4:48 AM

Super.Tramp:
I would pay twice as much for the 1911 edition as I did for the 2015 edition.

Wow, that is saying a lot. What an interesting article. Thanks for sharing. I'll keep my CP bid with the hope that one day it will make it into Logos.

Using adventure and community to challenge young people to continually say "yes" to God

Posts 483
Rodney Phillips | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Oct 24 2015 5:57 AM

Same here..  That article sold me..  Bid placed..

Posts 332
Steve Farson | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Oct 24 2015 8:29 AM

Rodney Phillips:

Same here..  That article sold me..  Bid placed..

Same here.

Posts 44
Mikael S | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 14 2016 1:23 PM

The new with the old. Yet another thread: The real Encyclopedia Br. is on CP (safer too) ...

Be curious and look at it from an angle of what is valuable about it when considering bidding! Consider how complex searches You'll run in it compared to other available interfaces (DVD, the web), and the double-click!

A fraction of us have read so much History as to be able to perfectly decipher over a hundred year old books. We can come closer to what the concepts of the authors of books now in the public domain were, by utilizing the 1911 encyclopedia in Verbum/Logos/Noet in the future.
Bidding high on it is a unique chance to help it into production. No other software company/library system would be better for producing it.
Quoting Disciple of Christ (doc): "It would provide a perspective on the world from this point in time - the people and events that were significant and what made them significant - the context and understanding of a world in which depending on our age, our great grandparents [or] grandparents [...] lived."
If You want to do the future a favour please bid high to help others out to get it, boosted by the platform! It will eventually enter production if we persist in speaking for this every once in a while (I hereby invite others to do that)! If You actually want the work some day You really ought to think of bidding higher. If it doesn't matter to You, bid high anyway if can remember You did or will be alert a decade from now!

The 2015 Edition was discussed Today with its shipping date having for what should be the last time pushed to 19th Sept. 2016:

Stephen Terlizzi:
What's another five days if it gives us a better product?

Agape,

Steve:

Steve:
Ditto!:
Bill Moore:

Thanks for the update, Ben. Anything that improves the resource is a plus for me, so I don't mind the delay.


About the 1911 Edition: >>Its pages contain all the knowledge of a World on the brink of deep and everlasting change.>>
The Edition is neither specialty-only nor has a narrow following.

translatio-princpld...
10 Bibls.. Supporting the cause of the right for data

Posts 268
Roger Dittmar | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 14 2016 1:30 PM

Yes I'm in!

Posts 141
Jerome Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 14 2016 3:09 PM

What has motivated my bid for this resource is the fact that its Bible and theology-related articles were written by a group of great Christian scholars. Such a group would probably not be possible to assemble today.  Literature is news that stays news, and so the 1911 edition remains of great interest and value even today.

Posts 228
Graham Owen | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Sep 15 2016 4:33 AM

Suspect that for this, and other projects of this magnitude, the best hope for seeing them published in Logos is that Faithlife manage to harness one of the emerging AI technologies to automate the tagging or perhaps reduce the requirement for tagging.

Posts 8601
TCBlack | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Sep 15 2016 5:43 AM

Alright, I am convinced.  I am in.

Truth Is Still Truth Even if You Don't Believe It

Check the Wiki

Warning: Sarcasm is my love language. I may inadvertently express my love to you.

Posts 287
Hapax Legomena | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Sep 15 2016 6:47 AM

I bid $100.00.  I hope it one day closes much lower.

Posts 947
Deacon Steve | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Sep 15 2016 9:34 AM

I bid $140 just over 3 years ago for many of the reasons Matthew cites.  This would be a fantastic resource to own!

Smile

Posts 592
Ted Weis | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 21 2016 8:33 PM

Ran across this in the Anchor Bible article on The Exodus:

Thus, about a century ago, in his famous article “Israel” in the Encyclopaedia Britannica, and subsequently reprinted with his pivotal work, the Prolegomena (WPHI, 429–30), Wellhausen clearly envisaged the entry into Egypt of a group of Hebrew shepherds and goatherds, eventually enslaved in Egyptian public works in Goshen. Later, at a time of plagues in Egypt, this modest community took secret flight, crossed wind-driven shallow waters (led by Moses), battling with Egyptian chariotry that failed to hold them and were swept off by returning waters. Thus the great architect of conventional literary criticism certainly held to a definite (if limited) Exodus led by Moses.

K. A. Kitchen, “Exodus, The,” ed. David Noel Freedman, The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary (New York: Doubleday, 1992), 701.

Posts 268
Roger Dittmar | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Sep 23 2016 1:54 PM

I paid $199 for EBNE and would happily have paid the same for the 1911 version. I had been very enthusiastic about the linkage of the EBNE with the Timeline and library resources and thought it well worth the premium cost. The EBNE was "Top Priority" for almost a year before finally being published. I've test driven the completed product and find that without the direct Timeline and library links it is of little use to me. The 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica is already available online for free.

I've cancelled my bid.

Posts 928
Bill Moore | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Sep 23 2016 2:00 PM

Roger Dittmar:

I paid $199 for EBNE and would happily have paid the same for the 1911 version. I had been very enthusiastic about the linkage of the EBNE with the Timeline and library resources and thought it well worth the premium cost. The EBNE was "Top Priority" for almost a year before finally being published. I've test driven the completed product and find that without the direct Timeline and library links it is of little use to me. The 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica is already available online for free.

I've cancelled my bid.

Did you return the EBNE, Roger? I'm on the fence with whether to keep or return it, though I'm leaning toward the latter.

Pastor, Cornerstone Baptist Church, Clinton, SC

Posts 268
Roger Dittmar | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Sep 23 2016 2:14 PM

I decided not to return the EBNE.  I'll just hope that someday the previously advertised linkages to the Timeline and resources will be incorporated. Wishful thinking on my part.

Posts 928
Bill Moore | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Sep 23 2016 2:21 PM

Roger Dittmar:

I decided not to return the EBNE.  I'll just hope that someday the previously advertised linkages to the Timeline and resources will be incorporated. Wishful thinking on my part.

Thanks. I understand. I go back and forth on it.

Giving me pause about returning it is the realization that, were I to return it, if would be gone from my Logos for the rest of my life. I would not spend over $200 even if it had all the articles available on the Britannica Ultimate DVD and had all the links worked out.

Pastor, Cornerstone Baptist Church, Clinton, SC

Posts 2250
mab | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Sep 23 2016 2:27 PM

Maybe. Certainly not a need. Of course, anything in Logos is more useful.

The mind of man is the mill of God, not to grind chaff, but wheat. Thomas Manton | Study hard, for the well is deep, and our brains are shallow. Richard Baxter

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