Welwyn Commentary series and Evangelical Press Study Commentary series?

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P A | Forum Activity | Posted: Mon, Nov 16 2015 8:19 AM

Hi

What is the difference between Welwyn Commentary series and Evangelical Press Study Commentary series?

Both are published by EP.

Are they aimed at different audience?

Thanks

P A

Posts 3938
abondservant | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 16 2015 8:29 AM

I have welwyn I'm not sure about the other though. I can post an excerpt.



Paul’s agony over the Jew (9:1–5)

The chapter opens with five verses of great intensity, in which Paul is full of mourning and agony, and is unutterably cast down in spirit.
Do not mock the apostle! There are some who say that in chapter 11, within a few minutes of our reading this, Paul promises a glorious future for the Jew. They interpret that chapter to speak of the restoration of Israel, and of blessing of such proportions that it exceeds all that ever preceded it in the history of the church, including Pentecost. Paul’s agony was so intense that he was ready to surrender his own hope of salvation if it would result in the salvation of his countrymen. It needs to be said that if Paul knew that, within minutes of describing his agony, he would be telling us that all earthly Israel is to be saved then his agony was insincere, his desire to be cut off was hypocrisy and he was wrestling with a mere phantom.
The fact that Paul was in such agony clearly spells out the fact that there is to be no restoration of Israel. His agony was prophetic in nature. It is incapable of any other explanation. Israel, as an earthly nation, no longer figures in God’s purposes. God has left it desolate (Matt. 23:38), and wrath has come upon it to the uttermost (1 Thess. 2:16). The kingdom of God has been taken from it and given to the Gentiles (Matt. 21:43). If this is not so, then Paul’s agony is meaningless.
Look at the description of his agony in verses 1–5. After assuring us, in the most striking terms, that he is speaking the truth, he says, ‘I am experiencing unceasing anguish. I have an unfeigned and constant burden. If my fellow Jews could be saved by my damnation, I would wish it to be so. Look at the privileges they have had. They are descended from him who was a prince with God. They were cut off from surrounding heathenism by God’s fatherly mercy. The Shekinah glory (the visible manifestation of the glory of the Lord) was displayed among them. God entered into covenant with them, and renewed that covenant several times. To them he gave his holy law, as well as the tabernacle and its sacrifices and the temple and its institutions. It was this nation which received the promises relating to the coming Messiah. To them belonged the great patriarchs, fathers, and others to whom God revealed himself. From this nation came the Christ himself, who is God over all and blessed for ever.’
These are the people over whom Paul expressed his continual sorrow. Some individuals in the nation had come to believe the gospel, as we shall see. But, taken as a nation, Israel was outside the sphere of salvation, despite its previous privileges. This was the cause of Paul’s agony. If we forget its reality and depth we shall find it difficult to understand the remainder of chapters 9–11.


The two Israels (9:6–13)


Stuart Olyott, The Gospel as It Really Is: Romans Simply Explained, Welwyn Commentary Series (Darlington, England: Evangelical Press, 1979), 112–113.

Checking for the other title.

Don't seem to have the other commentary set, would someone mind posting an excerpt from the same passage?

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Paul Caneparo | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 16 2015 8:29 AM

The Welwyn commentaries are more like sermons. Whereas the EP series are intermediate commentaries.

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DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 16 2015 4:46 PM

Paul Caneparo:

The Welwyn commentaries are more like sermons. Whereas the EP series are intermediate commentaries.

Yep, that sounds about right 

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