Linux version of Logos Bible Software

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This post has 634 Replies | 43 Followers

Posts 403
777 | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Dec 18 2009 2:15 AM

jcc:

Since somebody dragged this up, I used to want to support a linux version also, but after seeing how the mac fokes are doing, no thanks.  :)

Yeah, the way things are going I'd like to even see a working Windows version.  Smile

I'll pass on the Linux version too.  Besides, it'll probably only run on Caldera OpenLinux using Mono and Java for the gui glued to some 8 bit version of CP/M in a virtualbox instance to run a comma delimited text file as a database for each resource (decrypted of course, using the plastic decoder ring that used to come in each box of Lucky Charms cereal.)

 

 

Posts 1928
Donovan R. Palmer | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Dec 18 2009 2:32 AM

For forum efficiency, I sort of wish this thread would get locked so that a new one could be started! Who wants/can go back and read all these posts to create context for the last few pages?!? If people aren't doing that, then how do they know if this isn't becoming repetitive... kind of like the Hermeneutic Spiral I guess! Big Smile

Posts 1
troy pulkrabek | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Dec 20 2009 1:29 PM

hey guy's,

You don't need logo's for bible software for Linux, there are plenty of good programs already made for Linux.

There is Bibletime, Xiphos, Alkitab bible study, Firebible for Firefox and Bibledesktop.

Logos is not worth the hassle, nor is E-sword.

You can get most of your favorite apps in the bible software for Linux, Plus it's the only true way to brake away from M$.

I have been using Mandriva Linux exclusively for over a year now and I don't dual boot either, M$ is not worth it. Also Mandriva is the Best Distro out there, IMHO

God Bless

Posts 67
Brian Whalen | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Dec 20 2009 1:37 PM

There is also http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=ubuntuce

Brian Whalen

http://www.mcnazarene.com

Posts 1928
Donovan R. Palmer | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 21 2009 12:16 AM

troypulkrabek:
You don't need logo's for bible software for Linux, there are plenty of good programs already made for Linux.

Welcome to the forums!

Agreed, there are some great open source projects out there.  The big problem is that Bible software is not just the software reader, but the resources that you can obtain to install on it. Many of these programmes do not have the latest or a broad spectrum of scholarly works. I always encourage my friends to consider getting up to date Bible study materials because there have been such advancements made in new discoveries and research.

Posts 1
Jim Thompson | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 7 2010 2:03 PM

It would be great if this could be set up on Linux using crossover or some other wine based software.   I"m pretty much a Linux user and since this software isn't ported to Linux, I can' t use it. 

Jim

Posts 19
Aaron Blumer | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 23 2010 11:36 AM

Bob P., if you're still watching this thread, what are the chances that when Logos 4 is finished, you might turn the Logos 3 source over to the open source community to either work the WINE bugs out or engineer a Linux version?

Or... sell the source to a group chartered for that purpose (in the event that it doesn't work financially to give it away).

Of course, completely opening the source would create problems for control of the resources but if it's sold to an organization (or "licensed") to one that is legally obligated to protect it. Just tossing out ideas here. I've seen some pretty cool Linux games get developed in through model sort of like this, though the resource issue was a nonfactor in that case.

Posts 204
Steven Yu | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jan 24 2010 10:03 PM

Aaron Blumer:
Bob P., if you're still watching this thread, what are the chances that when Logos 4 is finished, you might turn the Logos 3 source over to the open source community to either work the WINE bugs out or engineer a Linux version?

Yes

"And you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free", John 8:32.
"你們必定認識真理,真理必定使你們自由", 約翰福音 8:3.

Posts 6
Fabian Lazarte | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Apr 21 2010 10:00 PM

I actually stopped using Libronix because I ditched MS completely. I know I lost several resources and books I bought, but I could not take M$ anymore. I am very pleased with Ubuntu CE (Christian Edition) which cames with "The Word" Bible software. I have never used it before but I am very impressed with it and there are plenty of resource, I would even dare to say more than e-sword.  I also work with computers (hardware) and I have installed Ubuntu in most of my friends (because otherwise I have to fix their viruses every month....for free) and they are very happy...And me too, some of them have not called me to fix their pc in more than a year! A true miracle.  I now started to promote Linux among the church and I am giving classes of e-sword and soon The Word. 

I miss Libronix, but I believe the future would be opensource so I am invest in it. It would not surprise me that soon would have a bible software that would be of the quality of Libronix for the open source machines. In the mind time, I use The Word, with resources that it would take me several years to go through  in their  entirety.   

Posts 505
Michael Kares | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Apr 21 2010 10:47 PM

Engines aren't the problem--resources are.  Since open-source is usually equated with "free" publishers won't license new academic titles for use on the said engine.  Old resources are helpful, but up-to-date reference works are very helpful for scholarly study (if not necessary).  One could say that a company like Logos could make their free engine open source and still charge for resources,  but the problem with having the engine source code for all the world to see is that someone would find a way to crack the DRM and steal books--Christians DO steal stuff (heck, I'm included in that group at times--I'm trying to quit)  This is why an open source Bible Engine is limited.

Posts 26505
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Apr 21 2010 11:08 PM

FabianLazarte:
I actually stopped using Libronix because I ditched MS comple

Please read the forum guidelines. We are asked not to name competitors products because of the way browsers select postings. You could still edit the posting to resolve the problem.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 84
Nigel Cunningham | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Apr 21 2010 11:51 PM

I'd like to see Presentation Layer bindings for Mono. If they were implemented, Logos 4 would run probably on Linux without any problems (there'd be about 600 functions to implement, based on a little attempt I made at running it several months back).

Posts 54
Andrew | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Apr 22 2010 5:29 AM

MichaelKares:

the problem with having the engine source code for all the world to see is that someone would find a way to crack the DRM and steal books.

This is only partially true. It certainly makes it easier. Consider the insanity with watching blu-ray movies on Linux, which is the reason that I do not own a blu-ray player for my computers.

Posts 35
Harvey Quackenbush | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Sep 10 2010 6:34 AM

WOW...

I actually read this entire thread. Add my vote to port to Linux... Using emulators are not the answer, in my opinion. It just adds another layer of complexity to an already untenable situation.

Linux is an operating system who's time has come. The old saying that you can manipulate statistics to reflect whatever view that you want to present is true, and alive and well on planet Earth.

Not all Linux users believe that software has to be "free, as in beer"... I pay for quality software by donation, or asking price. The old chicken and egg argument comes up every time when talking about porting a Windows based program over to Linux. What ever happened to the "build it and they will come" philosophy???

For what it's worth.

Harvey

Posts 688
Jerry Bush | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Sep 10 2010 6:55 AM

The reason I still use Windows is because of Logos. Otherwise, I would be gone.

That being said, Windows 7 has been pretty impressive except for the price. I originally ran L4 on XP and then went to Win7 and saw significant improvements, even on a slower machine.

But Bob's answer way back on page one of this thread will remain the driving force. It has to be a smart investment for Logos. I hope the market grows someday, but I don't see it happening soon.

Jerry

Win7 - - Intel Core i3, 530 @ 2 .93GHz - - 6GB RAM ATI Radeon HD Samsung 500GB SSD

Burning Bush Ministries

Posts 8
Michel Knisely | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Sep 30 2010 9:34 AM

Well, I'm soon to become a Logo users and I have been running solely Linux for years now.  I guess I'm in the same camp of either running a Win7VM or playing with trying to get it working under Wine.

I disagree with a lot of the comments in this thread that are downplaying Linux's market share, if you look at any of the studies they show machines that SHIP with Linux on them.  I've got 4 machines in arms reach of me right now that all shipped with Microsoft on them and are all running Linux now. 

We could discuss these statistics all day, but that's not the issue.  The issue is with the any software platform that is OS specific.  Why, with all the resources that are available today, is this an issue? There is literally an ARMY of software developers ready to help, and just because your software runs on Linux, it does not have to be free of cost.  Hey, I'd even pay a premium for the Linux version.

For now, just add me to the list of calm voices saying, "Please, invest in a more OS neutral development path."  I assure you, the market is there... and if you're planning on making inroads into the developing world with this software, having it available on Linux will be a BIG plus.

Posts 8601
TCBlack | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Sep 30 2010 10:09 AM

Michel Knisely:
I've got 4 machines in arms reach of me right now that all shipped with Microsoft on them and are all running Linux now. 
Big Smile Which tells me that you are a geek like me.  Smile

The majority of computer users are not geeks like me.  

I still field questions like "what's a mouse" from people.  While I use Linux, and understand it's inner workings to a light degree, while I've compiled LFS a few times just for fun and learned loads in the process, while I've installed multiboot systems and ran several distro's of Linux on purpose on my custom built server, while I regularly use SSH and terminals etc.... I still hold that Linux is a geek/hobbyist/business server/IT specialists platform with minimal market saturation for "normal" users.  That may be changing, canonical has helped that along quite a bit, but still market share is low.

The army of software developers are already being offered a currently small but hopefully growing bounty to make it work on crossover: http://www.codeweavers.com/compatibility/browse/cat/?app_id=321

 

EDIT: I just re-read this and I think I sound harsh.  I'm not trying to sound harsh I was smiling when I wrote it.  how can I make joviality come across better here?  More smilies?    SmileSmileSmileSmileSmileSmile

Truth Is Still Truth Even if You Don't Believe It

Check the Wiki

Warning: Sarcasm is my love language. I may inadvertently express my love to you.

Posts 8
Michel Knisely | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Sep 30 2010 11:56 AM

Getting something to work under WINE or any other type of compatibility layer is not the development help this needs.  We need to get the authors of the software to understand that this issue has been solved time and time again. I just recently read another good blog post about this yesterday:

http://whatupdave.tumblr.com/post/1170718843/leaving-net

Now, I know nothing about this guy, but I completely appreciate the perspective he has.  See, we geeks are happy to fiddle around and get it to work.  Yes, Linux used to be that way, but it's long since gone.  Companies (Cisco, HP, Oracle, IBM, Panasonic, New York Stock Exchange, etc),   and governments (Brazil, Cuba, Pakistan, Large parts of China, Spain, Germany, Philippines, Mexico City, etc) have either invested heavily in Linux or moved their operations completely to Linux either because of the cost or because the desktop environment is irrelevant to them.

In the same way I've moved my family over to Linux, and there wasn't a learning curve... there was a Firefox icon and a familiar looking word processor so we moved on w/out issue.  When you plug in the digital camera it imports the photos; simple and sweet.  My wife, and 6 yr old daughter, both of whom are far from being geeks, have flourished in this move.  They've come to appreciate that Daddy's no longer fighting spyware and that things just work; same as before.

Please help others with the understanding that Linux is NOT a geek OS... It's just a platform for applications.  The same applications that we already love and use on a daily basis. 

Also, help in dispelling the idea that just because you can run in on WINE, that the problem is fixed.  Wine has a purpose, but it's a bridge to the destination... application portability.  Let's encourage this company to start moving to the destination.

 

Posts 1228
Ron | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 5 2010 7:04 AM

Michel Knisely:
I disagree with a lot of the comments in this thread that are downplaying Linux's market share, if you look at any of the studies they show machines that SHIP with Linux on them.  I've got 4 machines in arms reach of me right now that all shipped with Microsoft on them and are all running Linux now. 

There are metrics out there that measure OS market share based on internet traffic.  Even those show Linux with only 0.85% market share.  I'm not trying to be a downer, but that's not a market that is worth targeting (from a business perspective).

Also, this is coming from a computer geek.  I've owned/operated my own IT consulting/contracting business for 17 years.  I install and play around with a couple of different distros of Linux every few years just to keep tabs on things.  It's always fun, but I've never been impressed enough to justify the hassle of switching completely over or even using it as anything more than a fun diversion every once in a while.  There are too many inconveniences for me, especially regarding trying to find and/or make work equivalents for software that I regularly use (esp. business accounting software).  IMHO, Linux on the server is great...Linux on the desktop is not likely to ever make extensive inroads.  How many years now has the Linux community been claiming that "THIS is the year of the Linux desktop"?  At least since the mid/late-90s IIRC.

Posts 8
Michel Knisely | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 5 2010 11:39 AM

While we could debate these numbers all day, it completely misses the point.  The options are out there to make this a non-issue.  Software vendors need to leverage these development platforms to reach everyone.  Thre is NO reason not to.  Vendor lock-in only keeps you from being able to reach consumers.

You mention as one of the hurdles holding you back from really considering Linux as a viable alternative for your needs as being MS only software.  This is #EXACTLY# the point.  There is no reason for that to be an issue.  I've even seen web based applications that lock you into using IE.  Why?  Well, the basics of it is that the writer of the applciation focused soly on Microsoft specific development instead of choosing a development platform that leveraged open standards making portability a non-issue.

Now, I'm not saying that LOGOS needs to be OpenSource, though I see no reason it couldn't and still protect the IP content that is the true value of the product.  What I'm saying is that with the technology we have, there is no reason why you would need to develop for any specific environment.  The portability issue has been solved... use one of the many solutions available and then it's a non-issue.  Linux, Mac, Unix, Solaris, BE-OS, or whatever the next hot thing is.

 

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