Anchor Yale Bible sale

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Ronald Quick | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 23 2016 1:32 PM

Definitely a good sale, but to much for me to buy the entire set.  I may pick up a couple, but I have no idea which two to get. 

Posts 834
Lew Worthington | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 23 2016 2:34 PM

I'm in the same situation. I also have to figure out what to get so I'll put everything into a spreadsheet. Yeah, I'm that organized (which is an optimistic way of saying obsessive compulsive).

Posts 932
Justin Gatlin | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 23 2016 2:43 PM

Koester on Hebrews is worth getting.

pgs 358-360:

Raising the issue of completion (7:11a), the author uses the term teleiōsis without defining it, allowing the term to evoke previous images for the goal of God’s actions. Earlier passages have spoken about the hope of being crowned with glory and honor (2:5–10), entering God’s promised rest (4:9–10), and inheriting the blessing that God promised to Abraham and his heirs (6:7, 12). Such hopes were not realized in the experience of listeners who had known reproach, abuse, dispossession, and imprisonment (10:32–34; 13:3, 13). Yet previous arguments have shown that Christ is already crowned with glory and honor (2:9), seated in a posture of rest at God’s right hand (1:3, 13), and that in Christ’s exaltation, the faithful catch a glimpse of the future that God has promised them. Here the author affirms that even now people can draw near to God through Christ (7:19), and he excludes the Law and Levitical priesthood as means by which God will accomplish his designs.

The initial statement places the issue at its most fundamental level: Did the Levitical priesthood ultimately accomplish God’s purposes (7:11a)? The author assumes that the answer is no, and his view runs counter to the dominant tendencies in Jewish sources. Writing before the destruction of the Temple, Philo called the Levitical priesthood “that perfect priesthood by which mortality is commended to and recognized by God” (Sacrifices 132; Moses 2.5; Special Laws 1.80). Writing in Rome decades after the Temple’s destruction, Josephus argued that in the Law, God established the most perfect form of community life by assigning “the administration of its highest affairs to the whole body of priests” (Ag. Ap. 2.184–88). Hebrews, however, contends that God did not complete his purposes through the Levitical priesthood.
Gravity is added by the comment that “the people had been given Law” concerning the Levitical priesthood (7:11b). It was understood that the Law ultimately came from God (NOTE on 7:11), so that what one said about the Law reflected what one thought about the God who gave it. Neither Jews nor early Christians divided the Law into “moral” and “ritual” components. Therefore, to speak about changing or abrogating one part of the Law meant changing an entire system (see pp. 114–15). Hebrews does not casually reject the Law, but points out that Scripture itself actually speaks about two types of priesthood (7:11d). Mosaic statutes established a priesthood that was passed down among the descendants of Levi, but Ps 110:4 spoke about a priest like Melchizedek, who was not from the tribe of Levi. There is constancy in that God provides for a priesthood and calls Jesus to the priesthood in a manner analogous to the way that he called Aaron (Heb 5:4–6). Yet there is a change in God’s way of working, because the promise concerns not a Levitical priest, but one like Melchizedek.
The “change of the priesthood” (7:12a) occurred through the exaltation of Jesus. To speak of such a change contrasts with Israel’s tradition, which spoke of the Levitical priesthood continuing in perpetuity (Exod 40:15; Num 18:19; 25:13; Josephus, Ant. 2.216; Jub. 32:1). Levitical priests were central to Israel’s life before the destruction of the Temple in A.D. 70, and even after the destruction priests remained influential in synagogue life. In the years after 70, the sages, who reconstituted Judaism around the study of the Torah rather than the Temple, continued to accept the priesthood in principle.237 Hebrews marks a shift from common Jewish views, but it maintains continuity with Israel’s tradition over against Greco-Roman practice at a crucial point: the author assumes that there will be only one priesthood. A first-century reader might think that Ps 110:4 simply added a new Melchizedek priesthood to the old Aaronic line, but creating multiple priesthoods would mean accommodation to Greco-Roman practice. Rome had four major priestly colleges plus three more priesthoods that represented the oldest strata of Roman religion. Other priesthoods were established for certain festivals and the cults of the deified emperors. Similar practices were common throughout the Mediterranean. Some priesthoods had lifetime tenure, others were for a limited period of time, and some individuals held multiple priesthoods simultaneously.238 In assuming that there could be but one priesthood, Hebrews develops Israel’s tradition.
Earlier, the author said that God’s purposes were unchangeable (6:18), but here he says that the Law has been changed (7:12b).239 The author is not speaking about human alteration of God’s Law, but about a change that God made by establishing the priesthood of Christ. Such a change differs from those made during the Maccabean period, for example, when some Jews altered traditional practices to conform to the norms of Gentile culture (2 Macc 11:24). According to Heb 7:12, God changes his own Law to conform to the purposes that he established by his promises. The difference between the Levitical priesthood and the priesthood of Jesus is accented by a flat acknowledgment that Jesus “belongs to a different tribe,” namely “Judah” (7:13a, 14a).240 If, on the one hand, the Law is fixed, then Jesus cannot be a priest, since Judean ancestry would have precluded it.241 On the other hand, if Jesus can in fact be considered a priest, then the Law that requires priests to descend from Levi is not a fixed principle.

Posts 599
Michael Kinch | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jan 24 2016 4:46 AM

Lew Worthington:

I'm in the same situation. I also have to figure out what to get so I'll put everything into a spreadsheet. Yeah, I'm that organized (which is an optimistic way of saying obsessive compulsive).

Hey Lew, don't feel bad, I am doing the same thing. I need to see things laid out so that I can decide which ones to get. There are 88 volumes in the set and 86 on sale.  From this thread the two missing are Revelation by Craig Koester and the recent Judges volume.

Posts 599
Michael Kinch | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jan 24 2016 7:35 AM

Here is my spreadsheet. The volumes that have been suggested in this thread are in bold type. I would add Jacob Milgroms's volumes on Leviticus to the list. In making my decision I will be looking at savings and ranking.  The ranking is from Best Commentaries.  It is difficult to make a decision based on someone elses ratings but at least it gives us a point to start from.  

Title Cost Savings Ranking
Mark 8–16 Joel Marcus 19.99 0.59 16
Proverbs 10-31 Michael V. Fox 19.99 0.62 18
The The Gospel according to John I–XII Raymond Edward Brown 19.99 0.59 6
The The Gospel according to John, XIII–XXI Raymond Edward Brown 19.99 0.59 6
The Romans Joseph A. Fitzmyer 19.99 0.62 35
The Hebrews Craig Koester 19.99 0.59 9
The The Gospel according to Luke I–IX Joseph A. Fitzmyer 19.99 0.66 12
The Epistles of John Raymond Edward Brown 19.99 0.66 6
The Galatians J. Louis Martyn 19.99 0.55 12
The The Gospel according to Luke X–XXIV Joseph A. Fitzmyer 19.99 0.66 12
The The Letter of James Luke Timothy Johnson 19.99 0.44 4
The Mark 1–8 Joel Marcus 19.99 0.51 27
The The Acts of the Apostles Joseph A. Fitzmyer 19.99 0.66 13
The Ecclesiastes Choon-Leong Seow 19.99 0.59 3
The Proverbs 1–9 Michael V. Fox 19.99 0.44 4
The Jonah Jack M. Sasson 19.99 0.44 3
The Leviticus 1–16 Jacob Milgrom 19.99 0.7 4
Psalms I: 1–50 Mitchell Dahood 19.99 0.44 38
The Isaiah 40–55 Joseph Blenkinsopp 19.99 0.44 34
The First Corinthians Joseph A. Fitzmyer 19.99 0.59 20
The First and Second Letters to Timothy Luke Timothy Johnson 19.99 0.55 11
The Ephesians 1–3 Markus Barth 19.99 0.55 16
The Ephesians 4–6 Markus Barth 19.99 0.44 16
The Isaiah 1–39 Joseph Blenkinsopp 19.99 0.44 34
The Exodus 1–18 William H. C. Propp 19.99 0.59 7
The Genesis E. A. Speiser 19.99 0.59 not ranked
The 2 Peter, Jude Jerome H. Neyrey 19.99 0.37 15
The I Samuel P. Kyle McCarter 19.99 0.51 6
The Jeremiah 1–20 Jack Lundbom 19.99 0.66 4
The Malachi Andrew Hill 19.99 0.44 4
The 1 Peter John H. Elliott 19.99 0.68 9
The Leviticus 23–27 Jacob Milgrom 19.99 0.66 4
The Exodus 19–40 William H. C. Propp 19.99 0.66 7
The II Corinthians Victor Paul Furnish 19.99 0.59 9
The Amos Andersen, Francis I., Freedman, David Noel 19.99 0.74 9
The Habakkuk Francis I. Andersen 19.99 0.62 10
The Jeremiah 21–36 Jack Lundbom 19.99 0.59 4
The Job Marvin Pope 19.99 0.55 not ranked
The Judges Robert Boling 19.99 0.44 5
The Psalms III: 101–150 Mitchell Dahood 19.99 0.44 38
Psalms II: 51–100 Mitchell Dahood 19.99 0.47 38
The The Letters to the Thessalonians Abraham J. Malherbe 19.99 0.51 8
The Ezekiel 1–20 Moshe Greenberg 19.99 0.44 12
The Ezekiel 21–37 Moshe Greenberg 19.99 0.44 12
The Joshua Boling, Robert, Wright, G. Ernest 19.99 0.59 10
The Leviticus 17–22 Jacob Milgrom 19.99 0.66 4
The Ruth Edward Campbell 19.99 0.19 11
The Colossians Barth, Markus, Blanke, Helmut, Beck, Astrid B. 19.99 0.51 11
The Deuteronomy 1–11 Moshe Weinfeld 19.99 0.52 14
The Revelation J. Massyngberde Ford 19.99 0.51 not ranked
The Esther Carey Moore 19.99 0.19 17
The II Kings Cogan, Mordechai, Tadmor, Hayim 19.99 0.51 14
The II Samuel P. Kyle McCarter 19.99 0.59 4
The Isaiah 56–66 Joseph Blenkinsopp 19.99 0.62 34
The The Letter to Titus Jerome Quinn 19.99 0.44 24
The Haggai, Zechariah 1–8 Meyers, Carol, Meyers, Eric M. 19.99 0.57 2
The The Book of Daniel Hartman, Louis, Di Lella, Alexander 19.99 0.37 21
The Philippians John H. P. Reumann 19.99 0.66 16
The Zechariah 9–14 Meyers, Carol, Meyers, Eric M. 19.99 0.66 2
The Song of Songs Marvin Pope 19.99 0.66 16
The Jeremiah 37–52 Jack Lundbom 19.99 0.59 4
The I Kings Mordechai Cogan 19.99 0.66 8
The Ezra, Nehemiah Jacob Myers 19.99 0.37 not ranked
The The Letter to Philemon Joseph A. Fitzmyer 19.99 0.25 9
The Hosea Andersen, Francis I., Freedman, David Noel 19.99 0.59 3
The Numbers 1–20 Baruch A. Levine 19.99 0.57 8
The I Corinthians Orr, William, Walther, James 19.99 0.51 9
The I Maccabees Jonathan Goldstein 19.99 0.7 Apocryphal
The Numbers 21–36 Baruch A. Levine 19.99 0.59 8
The Micah Andersen, Francis I., Freedman, David Noel 19.99 0.59 6
The Zephaniah Adele Berlin 19.99 0.59 8
The Nahum Duane L. Christensen 19.99 0.66 not ranked
II Maccabees Jonathan Goldstein 19.99 0.51 Apocryphal
The II Chronicles Jacob Myers 19.99 0.35 not ranked
The Wisdom of Solomon David Winston 19.99 0.37 Apocryphal
The Second Isaiah John McKenzie 19.99 0.37 not ranked
The Lamentations Delbert R. Hillers 19.99 0.44 6
The Daniel, Esther, and Jeremiah: The Additions Carey Moore 19.99 0.44 not ranked
The The Wisdom of Ben Sira Alexander   Skehan, Patrick, Di Lella, 19.99 0.59 Apocryphal
The Tobit Carey Moore 19.99 0.59 Apocryphal
The Obadiah Paul R. Raabe 19.99 0.55 5
The I Chronicles 10–29 Gary N. Knoppers 19.99 0.68 9
The Joel James L. Crenshaw 19.99 0.55 17
The Judith Carey Moore 19.99 0.37 Apocryphal
I & II Esdras Jacob Myers 19.99 0.44 Apocryphal
The I Chronicles 1–9 Gary N. Knoppers 19.99 0.66 9
Posts 1753
JoshInRI | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jan 24 2016 11:37 AM

Would a conservative new england Baptist hopeful assistant pastor benefit from some books in this series - e.g., the two on Mark for my Mark class at Luther Rice Seminary?  Just curious.

Posts 3896
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Friedrich | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jan 24 2016 2:47 PM

Michael Kinch:
Here is my spreadsheet.

Thanks for putting this together.  It is nice to see it all at once, more clearly laid out.

Michael Kinch:
The volumes that have been suggested in this thread are in bold type.

I'm thankful for those who gave recommendations.  It's a good starting point.  I'd like to more specifically plug Markus Barth's Ephesians.  It is thorough (TWO volumes on the tiny epistle) and has good theological insight.  Not sure why it is ranked 16th . . . 

Michael Kinch:
I would add Jacob Milgroms's volumes on Leviticus to the list.

What particularly did you like about this commentary--and a book that is often overlooked.  Intrigued...

Michael Kinch:
In making my decision I will be looking at savings and ranking.

. . . perhaps also consider the importance of the book--whether for your more likely studies, or to round out/build up your library on particular books. Of course that leaves me with a bit of dilemma with your Leviticus "thumbs up"--i don't do as much with that book (not suggesting it is not important) but at the same time, I am meagre in good commentaries there.  Tongue TiedWink

Again, your careful and helpful effort is much appreciated! 

I like Apples.  Especially Honeycrisp.

Posts 3896
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Friedrich | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jan 24 2016 2:48 PM

ps, at least on my browser, the ranking part falls off until I "reply" and then it appears in the right margin.

I like Apples.  Especially Honeycrisp.

Posts 5316
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jan 24 2016 3:18 PM

JoshInRI:

Would a conservative new england Baptist hopeful assistant pastor benefit from some books in this series - e.g., the two on Mark for my Mark class at Luther Rice Seminary?  Just curious.

These are of course critical works. I have found mark quite useful at times but have not used Daniel that much...

I would suggest looking into them. The mark volumes are very detailed... I have choose Mark 7:31 to have copied it to show you the detail of the notes... and have copied 2 paragraphs of the comments to give you an idea of it;s comments.


7:31. came out again from the region of Tyre and went through Sidon to the Sea of Galilee, going through the middle of the Decapolis region. Gk palin exelthōn ek tōn horiōn Tyrou ēlthen dia Sidōnos eis tēn thalassan tēs Galilaias ana meson tōn horiōn Dekapoleōs. Tyre and Sidon are in Lebanon, and it is perhaps significant that both Isaiah 35, which is alluded to at the end of our passage (see the COMMENT on 7:35–37), and Isa 29:17–19 mention Lebanon in the context of a divine cure for deafness.
If Mark’s wording is meant to describe a direct journey, it implies that Sidon and the Decapolis are on a line from Tyre to the Sea of Galilee. This is scarcely the case; the Sea of Galilee is southeast of Tyre, but Sidon is north of Tyre and the Decapolis region is mostly east of the Sea of Galilee (of the ten cities, only Scythopolis is west of it). Mark’s notice, then, is comparable to a description of an American trip from Portland to Denver via Seattle and the Great Plains or a British trip from Liverpool to London via Glasgow and Norfolk. Many have taken the verse as evidence that Mark is not a native of Palestine, but since the geographical knowledge of nonspecialists was even more faulty in antiquity than it is today, this is not necessarily the case (see Hengel, Mark, 148 n. 51). Moreover, as Lang (“Über Sidon”) and Theissen (Gospels, 243–45) have argued, Mark may be deliberately constructing for Jesus a tour of Gentile areas abutting Palestine—perhaps regions where there are Christian communities in his own day. Acts 21:3–6 and 27:3, for example, describe Christian communities in Tyre and Sidon, and there was also an important Christian center in Damascus, which is counted as part of the Decapolis in Pliny’s Natural History (5.16.74). Theissen points out that 7:31 and the other major Markan geographical “error,” the implication in 5:1 that Gerasa is near the Sea of Galilee (cf. 5:13), share several features: they relate to the part of Syria neighboring Palestine, they foreshadow the movement of the gospel to the Gentiles, and they are found at the beginning of a pericope, where one normally expects redactional activity. These similarities may well reflect the location of Mark’s audience; as Theissen puts it, “Jesus’ long detour over Sidon and the Decapolis in Mark 7:31 would have led him into the neighborhood of Markan Christianity.”


Joel Marcus, Mark 1–8: A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary, vol. 27, Anchor Yale Bible (New Haven; London: Yale University Press, 2008), 472.

7:31–34: scene-setting, request, and Jesus’ healing technique. After his encounter with the Syrophoenician woman, Jesus’ tour of Gentile regions (7:31) apparently brings him to the notice of other people in need, including the friends or relatives of a man who is deaf and has a severe speech impediment. They bring the man to Jesus with the plea that he administer a healing touch (7:32); as in 2:3–5, the fact that the man cannot come to Jesus and make his request himself emphasizes his helplessness.

Jesus responds by taking the man aside privately (7:33). This motif of secrecy, which is reinforced in 7:36a, is frequently found in ancient miracle stories, and it is of a piece with Mark’s retention of Jesus’ words of healing in the original Aramaic: both features enhance the atmosphere of mystery in the narrative (see the NOTE on “Talitha koum” in 5:41).

In line with this atmosphere, our passage, like its companion piece in 8:22–26, concentrates heavily on the method employed in the healing, graphically describing Jesus’ actions of spitting, sighing, and sticking his fingers in the deaf man’s ears (7:34). Nineham (204) intriguingly suggests that this description may have been intended for the instruction of Christian healers. This possibly pedagogic description is emphasized not only by its length but also by its chiastic arrangement:

A And he thrust his fingers into the man’s ears

B And having spat he touched the man’s tongue

B′ And having looked up to heaven he sighed

A′ And he said, “Be opened!”

Here the two actions at the beginning and end (AA′), the thrusting of Jesus’ fingers into the man’s ears and his command that those ears be opened, are indicated by finite verbs, and the actions correspond to each other (Jesus’ fingers symbolically open the man’s ears). In the center of the chiasm, similarly, the clauses have a parallel structure (aorist participle + aorist indicative) and perhaps correspond to each other thematically as well (Jesus’ sigh may mimic the desired termination of the man’s muteness; see the NOTE on “sighed” in 7:34). These stressed magical manipulations, and similar ones in 8:22–26, are probably a large part of the reason that Matthew omits both stories in his retelling of Mark.

Nineham D. E. Nineham, Saint Mark

 Joel Marcus, Mark 1–8: A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary, vol. 27, Anchor Yale Bible (New Haven; London: Yale University Press, 2008), 477–478.

I hope these help you decide or give you a feel for it at least.

-Dan

Posts 270
Kelvin Niblett | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jan 24 2016 6:33 PM

JoshInRI:

Would a conservative new england Baptist hopeful assistant pastor benefit from some books in this series - e.g., the two on Mark for my Mark class at Luther Rice Seminary?  Just curious.

I would say that if you are studying Mark, they would be definitely worth grabbing at their current price, they will give you some good insights and strong academic references for your papers you will have to write.

Once you finish college, they will most likely get some more use as you develop your preaching gifting.

Out of curiosity (I noticed you posted on another thread about church conflict books) are you just starting Bible college?

 

Posts 1753
JoshInRI | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jan 24 2016 6:45 PM

Thanks....I am an Mdiv Student at Luther Rice Seminary online www.lru.edu and am trying to augment my library with useful books.  Thanks Kelvin...blessings.

Posts 270
Kelvin Niblett | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jan 24 2016 7:24 PM

JoshInRI:

Thanks....I am an Mdiv Student at Luther Rice Seminary online www.lru.edu and am trying to augment my library with useful books.  Thanks Kelvin...blessings.

I am a Baptist Pastor in Australia.

I did everything backwards - I took on a call to pastor a church, and then did a 3 year B.Th whilst working initially bi-vocationally(6mths) and then full time in  pastoral ministry. (Plus having kids in this 3 years of madness)
When I moved from bi-vocational to full time ministry I used the funds that my company gave me from my un-used annual leave and brought into Logos. 

I have accumulated a large library both as a pastor and a student (and again as a student as I am now studying towards a Master of Theological Studies.

If you look me up on Facebook I would be more than happy to offer you my coal-face comments  about what resources/books I have found useful in managing time (minimizing) and maximizing returns as a pastor and theological student.

God Bless you in your studies and calling as a steward of the gospel

 

Posts 2867
Mike Childs | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jan 25 2016 7:22 AM

Personally, I bought the apocryphal books because that is the weakest section in my library.  I have plenty of excellent commentaries on all the canonical books.

"In all cases, the Church is to be judged by the Scripture, not the Scripture by the Church," John Wesley

Posts 258
Gary Osborne | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jan 27 2016 7:35 PM

I have none of the Anchor Yale Bible books, and can only afford a few of them (even at the great price offered right now).  As a conservative, evangelical Pentecostal pastor who believes in the full authority of Scripture, which volumes would I find most to my liking?  Any suggestions over the next few days (before the sale ends) would be great.  I'd like to take advantage of the sale, but need help in making picks.

Thanks ahead of time for any suggestions.

Posts 140
Dennis Hilario | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jan 27 2016 8:15 PM

I bought the 3 volumes of Jeremiah by J. Lundbom. It is highly recommended.

Posts 5316
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jan 27 2016 8:21 PM

Michael Childs:

Personally, I bought the apocryphal books because that is the weakest section in my library.  I have plenty of excellent commentaries on all the canonical books.

Great Idea... and I would encourage others to do this as well... The apocryphal books are a very important background to the thoughts of NT Judaism. These 8 volumes should be on everyones list, in my mind.

-Dan

  • Wisdom of Ben Sira (Vol. 39) by Alexander A. Di Lella and Patrick W. Skehan (1995)
  • Judith (Vol. 40) by Carey A. Moore (1995)
  • Tobit (Vol. 40A) by Carey A. Moore (1996)
  • I Maccabees (Vol. 41) by Jonathan A. Goldstein (1976)
  • II Maccabees (Vol. 41A) by Jonathan A. Goldstein (1995)
  • I & II Esdras (Vol. 42) by Jacob M. Myers (1995)
  • The Wisdom of Solomon (Vol. 43) by David Winston (1979)
  • Daniel, Esther, and Jeremiah: The Additions (Vol. 44) by Carey A. Moore (1995)
Posts 202
Stephen Terlizzi | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jan 27 2016 8:23 PM

I broke down and bought the Johannine and Pauline corpus. Both are of particular interest to my studies.

Agape,

Steve

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Friedrich | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 28 2016 7:09 AM

Gary Osborne:

I have none of the Anchor Yale Bible books, and can only afford a few of them (even at the great price offered right now).  As a conservative, evangelical Pentecostal pastor who believes in the full authority of Scripture, which volumes would I find most to my liking?  Any suggestions over the next few days (before the sale ends) would be great.  I'd like to take advantage of the sale, but need help in making picks.

Thanks ahead of time for any suggestions.

Gary, I don't know most of this series.  I own just a few of them.  Let me offer my thoughts based on that meager knowledge base, and most of it may be wrong...Wink

First, I don't know that there are any authors that will come from that persuasion--all those things you have listed.  That said, some of the books could be helpful to you.  For instance: Raymond Brown, a Roman Catholic, has written the commentaries on the Gospel of John and John's Epistles.  Though his works are a bit older in the series, they are considered very important and are one's that other commentators refer to.  So you would have Raymond Brown's actual commentary to refer to.  That said, I have found that he often had very helpful comments that bring out themes and meaning from John's writings that were beneficial to me as I studied John for my own sermon series.  I do not remember him as being "so Catholic" (not arguing whether that is bad or good) that it might turn off a conservative "protestant."  His are important works.  If you buy them and find that they are not what you want, Logos has a 30 day return.

Another work that was helpful was Markus Barth's on Ephesians. 2 volumes.  He is the son, I believe, of Karl Barth.  (pure conjecture alert!--) I don't think he was as "liberal" as his dad is characterized.  At anyrate, I found him to be a careful student and expositor with several good insights.  Because he offers 2 volumes, he is very thorough.  Worth a try on this key NT epistle.  

What I have recommended above does require some digging and thinking, but if you like that, they could be helpful.

One I do not have that people really seem to like is James, by Luke Timothy Johnson.  He is also Catholic--lol, but I used to think he was Protestant!--He is a critic of the "Jesus Seminar" (which is thought of by many as "ultra liberal") but some might consider him a bit liberal himself.  He is a good writer and thinker.  James is a good, practical, epistle and you might find good nuggets in his commentary. 

I like Apples.  Especially Honeycrisp.

Posts 258
Gary Osborne | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 28 2016 7:58 AM

Friedrich,

Thanks ever so much for those thoughts!  You got the gist of my request, and while I'm not trying to be obtuse I'm also not looking to purchase commentaries that I wouldn't use much because of disagreements with the theological slant of the writer.  I am a conservative Protestant (Pentecostal) and I'm not interested in adding more liberal commentaries to my collection.  No offense intended.

If anyone else has any suggestions, I'd love to hear them. 

Posts 932
Justin Gatlin | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 28 2016 8:25 AM

Gary Osborne:
I'm not interested in adding more liberal commentaries to my collection.  No offense intended

If you are looking for commentaries which will just help you vocalize what you already believe,  skip AYBC. They are all more or less liberal and if you are the kind of pastor who will consult two commentaries in preparation of a sermon, these will essentially never be in the top two or three.  Themelios ran a review with similar thoughts in volume 34. Volume 39, issue 3, identifies the better ones in the new testament,  but they are still really for people with a scholarly bent. 

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