Integrating Logos with the Nota Bene Word Processor

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Harrison Harnden | Forum Activity | Posted: Mon, Mar 21 2016 5:38 PM

Please direct me to any and all resources relative to integrating Logos with the Lingua form of the word processor Nota Bene.  I know there are several writers (including N T Wright et al) that use both but I do not know how they have manage in doing it.  I use both programs but cannot make them work seamlessly together.  Please help! 

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Sean | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 21 2016 6:57 PM

Welcome to the forums!

I use both programs. What specifically are you looking to do? Original language text from Logos usually copies & pastes perfectly into Nota Bene/Lingua. As far as the bibliography database goes, I do not know a way of transferring resource information directly from Logos to Ibidem; I have always done it manually.

N.T. Wright uses NB, but I'm not sure of how he has it set up. The program comes with many pre-formatted layouts and citation styles, but I don't recognize the one he uses. What I speculate he does is make his own footnote then inserts his Author-Date format citation into it. That's certainly an unorthodox convention, but it seems to work for him.

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Harrison Harnden | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 22 2016 5:25 AM

hanks for the quick and helpful response.  I have been with Nota Bene since version 4 which was DOS!  In fact, because of Nota Bene's failure to deal with snaking columns in the early windows versions I stayed too long using the DOS version!  Now I deal with rich text format from Microsoft Word from Logos and import thus to Nota Bene.  I wish that Nota Bene had not stayed with the basic XY Write base.  But I am a great fan of Orbis, the old Orbis so I am always doing work-arounds.,

I pretty much follow exactly what you have suggested but was trolling to see if there were a better way.  I agree with your words on N T Wright.  I do not recognize his process either -- it must be his own process. Thanks again for your help and if there are others with other approaches please let me know.

    

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Veli Voipio | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 22 2016 6:09 AM

I recall having Nota Bene in the early 1990s and am surprised to hear someone is still using it.

Have they been updating the product and how?

I guess it is not graphical (or wysiwyg as the term was in those days)?

Gold package, and original language material and ancient text material, SIL and UBS books, discourse Hebrew OT and Greek NT. PC with Windows 8.1

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Sean | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 22 2016 6:37 AM

Veli Voipio:

I recall having Nota Bene in the early 1990s and am surprised to hear someone is still using it.

Have they been updating the product and how?

I guess it is not graphical (or wysiwyg as the term was in those days)?

It's still around. I used it to write two dissertations; it was mostly a good experience. The bibliography management is terrific, and Greek & Hebrew C&P beautifully from Logos. It is WYSIWYG, but you can still switch to a code view to place or remove formatting etc. directly. I like the amount of control it offers.

However, the company had a lot of problems when Windows rolled over to 64-bit versions in Win 7, 8, & 10. It took forever for them to get a compatible version out of beta, and I think they have suffered for it. (The late-in-arriving version was version 10; right now they really want us to pay $89 to get version 11, which I guess adds a different page view and a search option or two. No thanks!) For quite some time I thought this was my "academic word processor for life"; at this point, I'd be willing to look at other options, should the need arise, without too much regret over the hours I spent inputting my books into the bibliography database.

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Dale Brueggemann | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 23 2016 9:46 AM

Yes, it's still around, and greatly improved--although they were slow to get a 4-bit version out, we have it now. It's my go-to academic word processor. Sometimes I think its secondary function--right after academic word processing--is to keep me perpetually aggravated at what a wreck MS Word is as an academic word processor. Super Angry

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