What strategies do you use for note-taking whilst reading?

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Mark Barnes | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Sep 2 2016 12:01 AM

Thanks for all the responses, guys. I appreciate it.

I haven't yet had chance to read them all carefully and follow up the links, but I'll do that today. I particularly appreciate the Udemy course link — I looked there prior to posting, but didn't find anything.

For myself, the most helpful thing I found before posting was this: https://www.farnamstreetblog.com/how-to-read-a-book/, which is based heavily on Adler's work, but is relatively short and sweet, and obviously more up-to-date. 

In the meantime, if anyone stumbles on this thread, the more ideas the merrier!

 

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Martin Folley | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Sep 2 2016 2:06 AM

For me, it is important to find al the highlights and notes in a single place ... i.e. Logos

External notes are done in Word (or moved to Word) so that I can turn them into a personal book.

2010 17" MBP with High Sierra, iPad4 with iOS10.

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Glenn Crouch | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Sep 2 2016 2:18 AM

Richard Villanueva:

Just want to echo that I'm grateful this thread was started!! I've got no answers but I'm taking notes on everything being shared!! 

Agreed :) Maybe FL will see some areas where they can add for Logos 8 Wink

Pastor Glenn Crouch
St Paul's Lutheran Church
Kalgoorlie-Boulder, Western Australia

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Mike Tourangeau | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Sep 2 2016 7:23 AM

alabama24:
Logos does have a "quotes view." If you use "resource specific" note documents, they are all in one place. 

Wow! How did I miss this? Is there a way to search all the highlighting in a particular book?

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Levi Durfey | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Sep 2 2016 7:46 AM

Mike Tourangeau:
Is there a way to search all the highlighting in a particular book?

You would conduct a search for all highlights in a resource, like this:

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Kason | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Sep 2 2016 7:51 AM

I have found 'clippings' very beneficial. 

If I am preaching out of James 2, I'll read through various commentaries and post all helpful information to a 'clippings' titled James 2. Then when I go to prepare a message I can review all my clippings.

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Mark Barnes | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Sep 2 2016 8:20 AM

I'm sure my system will evolve, but the time being I'm going with what I consider to be the best from all the suggestions:

  1. For Logos resources, a resource-specific highlighting file with:
    • Points of disagreement
    • Important/interesting sections
    • Summaries
    • Supporting arguments
    • Quotable quotes
  2. For all resources, a separate resource-specific notes file with a note attached to each chapter heading, which contains a summary of that chapter. I'll also attach the notes to relevant Bible passages, if the note would shed light on that passage.

The theory is that the notes and the highlighting will help me to find things later, whilst the discipline of typing the notes will help me to remember things. We'll see!

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Michael Sullivan | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Sep 2 2016 8:34 AM

I don't practice this method (because I am too lazy) but here is what I believe is the best method for retaining what you read.

1) After reading a section/chapter, summarize what you read in your own words on a piece of paper with a pencil.

2) Using dictation software (my favorite is Dragon Professional Individual, which will probably go on sale around Black Friday) speak my notes into the computer.

Why not type the notes into the computer?  Because you involve more of the senses: you are forming words with your mouth instead of pressing buttons, and hearing them as well.  And, since dictation software isn't 100% accurate, you will be looking carefully at your notes to find all the places "Jesus" was interpreted as "cheeses" (an early problem with dictation software).

Anyway, that's my two cents.

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David A Egolf | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Sep 2 2016 9:06 AM

Mark Barnes:

I'm sure my system will evolve, but the time being I'm going with what I consider to be the best from all the suggestions:

      1 For Logos resources, a resource-specific highlighting file . . .

      2 For all resources, a separate resource-specific notes file . . .

Mark,

I would have liked to separate my notes from my highlights, but I didn't find an easy way to "toggle" between them on my iPad.  Would you use this method on a mobile device?

Also, while we're at it, is there some distinction between "Logos resources" and "all resources"?

David

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Mark Barnes | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Sep 2 2016 9:18 AM

David A Egolf:
I would have liked to separate my notes from my highlights, but I didn't find an easy way to "toggle" between them on my iPad.  Would you use this method on a mobile device?

That's a good question.

At the moment, I'm focusing on retaining what I've read. That means I'm planning to write one set of notes per chapter. I'm not intending to attach notes to individual words or paragraphs. That means I shouldn't need to do too much toggling.

The two most articles/videos I've viewed both said that if you're trying to retain information, then you should go into "work mode". That is, lounging on a chair isn't a great way to study (although it can be a great way to read for pleasure). That struck a chord, so I intend to do my serious reading at a desk, and therefore can use Logos on my PC.

If that isn't practical (e.g. I have some down-time that I want to make good use of), I'll probably use another app to take notes, and then transfer them to Logos once I'm done. I think it will be easier to task switch to the other app, than keep switching between a Logos resource and a Logos notes document on my iPhone.

David A Egolf:
Also, while we're at it, is there some distinction between "Logos resources" and "all resources"?

By "all resources", I mean I'm also intending to use Logos to store my notes on print books and Kindle books.

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Alan Cleveland | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Sep 3 2016 4:23 AM

This thread has been extremely helpful!  Thank you for all the helpful suggestions.

For my Bible study I have found it easier to create a note file for a chapter.  I will then copy-and-paste from any of my resources into that particular file.  If create a note file for a verse or section of verses, I do the same cut-and-paste.  I create a folder in Favorites according to the name of the Biblical book (this helps me keep things visually organized).  Then when I read and come across a note indicator, all the resource notes and any personal notes are in one place.

This has certainly got me thinking about notes, clippings and highlighting when it comes to general reading.  Again, lots of great input!

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Michael Kinch | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Sep 3 2016 7:04 AM

Thanks everyone for all of your comments.  Some great study techniques were suggested.  A lot of the suggestions though related to finding information that you have read rather than remembering the details.  For me to remember those things I need to differentiate between what I want to be able to locate later and what I want to remember.  So with that in mind I need a separate highlighting system for each.  For the things I want to remember I also need a system of review.  If I was taking a course and facing an exam I wouldn't consider going into the exam without reviewing what I had studied. I have found that if I do not review new material I tend to forget it.  I even forget where I read it sometimes.

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EX | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Sep 3 2016 9:13 AM

Thank you guys for your comments. I have not use the sermon editor yet. But is it possible to use sermon editor for note-taking?

Am I thinking outside of the box or thats just an unworkable solution?

p.s. I am a  bit disappointed that Logos 7 did not address the note-taking aspect of Logos.

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Graham Criddle | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Sep 3 2016 1:19 PM

EX:

Thank you guys for your comments. I have not use the sermon editor yet. But is it possible to use sermon editor for note-taking?

No, that wouldn't be a good idea

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David A Egolf | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Sep 3 2016 1:42 PM

Michael Kinch:

Thanks everyone for all of your comments.  Some great study techniques were suggested.  A lot of the suggestions though related to finding information that you have read rather than remembering the details.  For me to remember those things I need to differentiate between what I want to be able to locate later and what I want to remember.  So with that in mind I need a separate highlighting system for each.  For the things I want to remember I also need a system of review.  If I was taking a course and facing an exam I wouldn't consider going into the exam without reviewing what I had studied. I have found that if I do not review new material I tend to forget it.  I even forget where I read it sometimes.

Any thread which discusses organizing information in Logos should give an honorable mention to Favorites.  My research and class organization starts here.  It allows me to collect resources of interest here for particular topics or just reading lists.  One can store resources, bookmarked resources, notes files, layouts, searches, and other things.

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DIsciple II | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Sep 3 2016 2:01 PM

Mark Barnes:
At the moment, I'm focusing on retaining what I've read. That means I'm planning to write one set of notes per chapter.

Yes

 I think this is an important key. If we can't go back and make some notes about what we have just read then we probably haven't understood it and therefore have no hope of retaining it.

Mark Barnes:
The two most articles/videos I've viewed both said that if you're trying to retain information, then you should go into "work mode". That is, lounging on a chair isn't a great way to study (although it can be a great way to read for pleasure). That struck a chord, so I intend to do my series reading at a desk, and therefore can use Logos on my PC.

"Posture" is also an important key that sets the tone for what you are doing.

Some good points Mark which I believe (if I retained the informaiton correctly) Danny Zacharias brings out in his Udemy Course

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Al Het | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 7 2016 3:31 PM

Mark, and any other pastors/preachers who shared that they use or will use Logos to highlight and make notes:

Assuming you keep some type of files for illustrations, do you keep your illustrations in your Logos program (presumably in Notes) as well as highlights and notes for books?  I haven't looked closely at the "Notes" capability for Logos, so I don't even know if that is possible.

I've become pretty good at collecting illustrations and interesting stuff that might be useful in sermons, as I walk around living life.  However, accessing that information each week has been a weakness.  I can always come up with something, but it was pretty common for me to come across one (or many) illustrations, and think, "Dang, that would have been perfect for my sermon two weeks ago..."

Before keeping my illustrations AND reading highlights and notes in the same place, I was pretty bad at drawing illustrations at what I have read.  I'm assuming others either have better recall of what they read than I do, or they have better systems.  I've always been impressed by preachers pulling support or illustrations from a variety of authors.

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Al Het | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 7 2016 3:39 PM

Michael Kinch:
 A lot of the suggestions though related to finding information that you have read rather than remembering the details.  For me to remember those things I need to differentiate between what I want to be able to locate later and what I want to remember.  So with that in mind I need a separate highlighting system for each.

Yeah, when I started "electronically" highlighting my reading material, my retention seemed to actually get worse.  It's sort of the double-whammy, as highlighting and taking notes obviously slows me down significantly.  Slower, but I don't remember as much.  Not a great combo.

I've begun going back and reading my notes and highlights when I'm done with the book.  I take my time, and think them through as I read them.  This really works for me, though it increases the time by another factor.  It does seem to give me much better retention than I used to have when I just read books.  The biggest problem happens when the book is particularly rich, and I highlighted a huge amount of the book.  Almost like having to re-read the whole book again.

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 7 2016 3:47 PM

While I am reading, I rarely do more with notes or markup than the electronic equivalent of a check mark for "worth noting" and a question mark for "I'm not convinced" or "you idgit". I go back and add notes after I've finished reading the chapter or other logical segment.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Al Het | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 7 2016 7:21 PM

MJ. Smith:
While I am reading, I rarely do more with notes or markup than the electronic equivalent of a check mark for "worth noting" and a question mark for "I'm not convinced" or "you idgit". I go back and add notes after I've finished reading the chapter or other logical segment.

Hmmmm.  I'm going to give that some thought.  One of the things I don't like about highlighting or note-taking is the disruption of flow-of-thought.

Not sure if my Kindle will allow flagging something like that or not.

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