Mind Map Users?..

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This post has 39 Replies | 5 Followers

Posts 758
David A Egolf | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 21 2016 10:02 PM

MJ. Smith:

I've been amused watching the concept of mind mapping moving from web to hierarchical ... not to its advantage in my mind.

The progression has occurred in other areas of computing.  The original computer databases; e.g., IMS from IBM were hierarchical and, thus, limited is the way that data relationships could be expressed. 

My company, Honeywell, helped push a "network" database model based on the CODASYL standard.  It allowed data relationships that could be more like a modern web site.  A parent record could link to children which could also have children.  Any of the children could link back to parents, grandparents, or other chains of records.  The relationships between records was very expressive and more akin to a tangled web.  It fell from favor because the programs accessing the data had to have the procedural knowledge required to successfully traverse the links. 

It was considered bad form for the COBOL programmers who were the keepers of the business logic to have to have intimate knowledge of the database internals.  Thus, relational databases were born in the 1980's.  Relational data could be accessed by queries which described the attributes of the desired data.  Locating the actual records, now known as tuples, was left to the machinations of the database engines. (One of my jobs at that time was figuring out how to make our database engine commercially feasible.)  The database administrators were supposed to guide the COBOL developers to make less expensive queries and madly added indices in order to reduce the query costs. 

Alas, they found that some very simple relationships could not be easily expressed.  For example, if there is an A, then there must be at least one B.  This had been simple in the CODASYL world.  The relational mavens started adding constraints and rules to the systems which made up for the expressiveness lost.

On a different level, in the mid-1980's a product showed up on thee Macintosh called HyperCard.  It was a simple concept that all data, or ideas, could be kept as a simple stack of "cards" where individual fields in the cards could refer to other cards in the same stack or other stacks.  Rules could be built on fields, records, cards, or stacks.  The application was marvelous in that it was the first practical application for "hyperlinks", much later employed by URLs, and object programming (of sorts).

One could build HyperCard stacks to depict complex data sets in a very similar fashion as a mindmap.  But since it did not have the pictorial representation, it was much more like building a web site with rules.

When I was finally forced to migrate to Windows, HyperCard was the thing I missed the most.

So I also see "hierarchical" representations as a step backwards and was concerned that my favorite mindmap tool, FreeMind, regarded attempts at making a "network" as an afterthought.

Posts 26530
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 21 2016 10:27 PM

Yes

I spent most of my career on Burroughs-Unisys. On the PC side I was a big fan of Houdini - the hyperlinked program whose predecessor brought Nixon down. "In 1986, he (Neil Larson) released his DOS Houdini network browser program that supported 2500 topics cross-connected with 7500 links in each file along with hypertext links among unlimited numbers of external ASCII, batch, and other Houdini files,"

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 583
Hamilton Ramos | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 1 2016 5:30 AM

Hi Liam, God bless:

Have you looked at Scapple. It integrates with Scrivener well.

https://www.literatureandlatte.com/scapple.php

Peace and grace.

Posts 1
Bob Freud | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Apr 11 2017 6:16 PM

I was (and still am) a Maxthink DOS and Houdini user. I use Maxthink for writing projects and every few years I dust off Houdini and learn it again for projects that require other types of thinking. I'm interested in your mention of the fact that Houdini brought down Nixon. What's the story behind that. I remember that Neil Larson once told me that somebody had used Houdini to help get a president elected (although I forget which one).

Bob

Posts 155
Dennis Davis | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Apr 12 2017 9:34 AM

I agree with you M.J.  TheBrain is great for handling large amounts of data. The other sweet spot for The Brain is that, unlike most mindmap programs, it does not focus on a single center point with nodes branching off.  Instead it uses a more dynamic interface that centers on whatever text you search for.  This is very useful, however, the program is not quite as good looking as some of the other programs out there (i.e. mindmanager, xmind, etc.)

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Apr 13 2017 11:51 AM

Bob Freud:
I'm interested in your mention of the fact that Houdini brought down Nixon.

Houdini was used to organize the data for the Watergate investigation - one of it's first uses to prove the value of its the method of organizing data. Source of the information is Houdini's blurbs on the product.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 2
Shalin Siriwardhana | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jul 23 2018 3:17 AM

My suggestion is Creately, as its one of the comprehensive diagram suits that can be used online. All your questions will be answered with it. Also you can find some good mind map examples in creately diagram community. There are 1000s of templates and examples in the community to be used freely.

Posts 443
Bill Cook | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jul 23 2018 8:14 AM

A lot has happened since this thread. Mindomo has a good product (iOS and Desktop) and a very neat presentation mode.

Posts 6410
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jul 23 2018 8:48 AM

Bill Cook:

A lot has happened since this thread....

Yeah, 2 years have passed and iMindmap 11 just released a month or so ago; which means L8 might release any time soon 👍😁👌 Time sure flies!

Posts 155
Dennis Davis | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jul 23 2018 9:27 AM

MJ,

Here Here for TheBrain!  I have been using it for years and although its price point has gone through the roof for upgrading, I still think its the king of mindmap tools because of its versatility.  :)

Posts 443
Bill Cook | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jul 23 2018 12:02 PM

I like TheBrain. I tried to use it for a while - free version. But what I did not like about the free version was that you could not print. Is just expensive to really utilize.

Posts 638
Michael S. | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jul 24 2018 4:04 AM

Bill Cook:

Mindomo has a good product (iOS and Desktop) and a very neat presentation mode.

But expensive... have to buy every 6 months...

Posts 443
Bill Cook | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jul 24 2018 10:22 AM

Michael S.:

Bill Cook:

Mindomo has a good product (iOS and Desktop) and a very neat presentation mode.

But expensive... have to buy every 6 months...

Not as much as Brain or imindmap or MindManager...

Posts 459
J. Remington Bowling | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 25 2018 7:57 AM

I can't imagine paying this much money (TheBrain or iMindMap) every month or year when you can get options that are, imo, just as good with MindMup or MindNode. 

The only software that really looks a bit different is TheBrain, because it can zoom into a highlighted node, as if it were the main node... But I really don't see why that's worth hundreds of dollars. Although I can see why a university or business might make use of it if it can handle much larger maps. (I do very large book mapping in MindNode and MindMup and have never run out of room)

Posts 638
Michael S. | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 25 2018 8:51 AM

J. Remington Bowling:

I can't imagine paying this much money (TheBrain or iMindMap) every month or year when you can get options that are, imo, just as good with MindMup or MindNode. 

(I do very large book mapping in MindNode and MindMup and have never run out of room)

Do you mind offering some comparing and contrasting, and pros and cons of these two programs?

Thanks!

Posts 6410
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 25 2018 9:01 AM

Bill Cook:

Michael S.:

Bill Cook:

Mindomo has a good product (iOS and Desktop) and a very neat presentation mode.

But expensive... have to buy every 6 months...

Not as much as Brain or imindmap or MindManager...

In the long run, iMindmap is the best because you don’t have to upgrade every six months but every two years and you get 60% off to upgrade. Besides, you don’t have to upgrade unless you want the new extra features.  

DAL

Posts 155
Dennis Davis | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 25 2018 9:20 AM

Michael,

I totally agree about pricing in TheBrain.  I owned an old version from years back that I got on discount through my job and still use that version.  I have not and will not upgrade or move to a subscription based plan.  Having said that, I still think it is the best tool in this space simply because it does not use a central node.  About 10 years back, a few of the members in the forum built some really cool brains based on books of the bible which turned out really well but required ALOT of work to build and then update.  Still, if the OP can find a copy of this tool I would recommend it.  Short of that, just go with something cheaper/free like imind.

Posts 638
Michael S. | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 25 2018 2:48 PM

iMind has a 20% coupon for a little while today, so the basic home/ student version is $80 after the savings... worth it?

Posts 6410
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 25 2018 4:51 PM

Michael S.:

iMind has a 20% coupon for a little while today, so the basic home/ student version is $80 after the savings... worth it?

It’s worth it if you actually use it, if not save your money. I’d go for the Ultimate Edition, though...More functionality, which is what I own.

DAL

Posts 1
Elizabete Briani | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Mar 30 2019 12:05 PM

Hello, grace and peace.
I've used the cmap tools app for over 10 years to study academic articles and now I'm going to use it to study Church History. Like this there is a global community that produces and shares these maps. It is also free and the community is very active in this production.
ps: Sorry for the translation of the language.
Strong hug

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