PRE-PUB in Danger--fortress studies on passages in the gospels

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This post has 56 Replies | 1 Follower

Posts 5248
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 7 2017 6:49 PM | Locked

I think Denise meant to get the NJB into production we would need to double the price. since its currently at 50% or there about..

-Dan

Posts 10110
Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 7 2017 7:04 PM | Locked

Roger, sorry to confuse! Even if all the bidders kicked in $4, you'd still soon be on the prepub deathlist.

I really don't understand Logos. And I'm not even remotely Catholic. But not long ago, I received a stack of Bibles from Logos, all badly translated (except for Julia Smith's, of course). But NJB sits and sits. I'm just glad I don't work at Bellingham HQ. They have an odd set of priorities. (Yes, business, but fairly well regarded 'Bibles'?). And, yes, I have a nice collection of Logos prepub'd resources denying Exodus, YHWH, and so forth, all lovingly approved for production and sales.

Ok, let's get back to what's important. Basketball!!


Posts 915
David Carter | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 7 2017 9:17 PM | Locked

Ben Amundgaard (Faithlife):
I'm sorry for the confusion.

And I'm sorry that this is just pathetic

Posts 4905
DIsciple II | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 7 2017 11:49 PM | Locked

David Carter:

Ben Amundgaard (Faithlife):
I'm sorry for the confusion.

And I'm sorry that this is just pathetic

 

It would be really poor form of FL to pull this title now given their error in the calculation and that other resources no where near as close as this title is to making it will not be pulled on the 20th March.

Posts 5248
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 8 2017 7:53 AM | Locked

What I find interesting to s that FL is trying a more typical business approach offering two offerings from fortress press with no guarantee that they will sell enough to recover costs, yet we have nearly enough to cover costs here and may not get them, personally the books chosen to try out none prepub have no interest to me, yet these three deeply interest me. Faithlife will do what they feel is best, but if this set gets pulled I can already see there will be hard feelings. NOT BY ME -- I want these books I am disappointed that it went under contract briefly giving me hope, but realize things go wrong. If FL doesn't want to sell me these books it is their business, but they are the only hurting themselves in the end, I recently saw a new user at least to the forms asking for an availability date for his Bible, but seeing there was absolutely no red at all in the line did my best to explain the system and that there was no guarantee that it would ever be out. The system that has worked well for FL in the past may in the end be its downfall. When I can get the book I want right away in Kindle why wait years for it in FL. Yes integration is nice but you need it when you need it sometimes. Several times I have seen Accordance or Olivetree release a book while FL books sit in Limbo of PP. and often these companies are having introductory pricing that is far lower than FL PP pricing. For me NJB full edition is the perfect candidate for development now as it could easily be added into every single LogosVerbum 8 library package offered. This is how many CP books finally got made. In the end FL knows their business but sometimes their actions seem less than ideal or wise to me, but then again I am not in a position to know half of what the situation is at FL..

-dan

Posts 861
LogosEmployee
Ben Amundgaard (Faithlife) | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 8 2017 10:37 AM | Locked

Dan Francis:

Ben Amundgaard (Faithlife):
I'm sorry for the confusion.

No backsies... Stick out tongue

Will try to convince more but not sure it will happen but God willing we will get it through.

-dan

It's really close again. I think with a little push we can get this over before 3/20.

Manager, Bible Study Products Department

Posts 5248
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 8 2017 11:21 AM | Locked

While at 96% https://www.logos.com/product/52352/fortress-studies-on-passages-in-the-gospels I would hope it gose through people give it a chance, remember like all Logos purchases if you decide you don't want it return it it within 30 days is an option. But I do think most will enjoy these books from what i have seen.

-dan

Posts 4905
DIsciple II | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 8 2017 11:31 AM | Locked

Ben Amundgaard (Faithlife):

Dan Francis:

Ben Amundgaard (Faithlife):
I'm sorry for the confusion.

No backsies... Stick out tongue

Will try to convince more but not sure it will happen but God willing we will get it through.

-dan

It's really close again. I think with a little push we can get this over before 3/20.

There is no FL in 'we' of this effort Ben, it has been Dan doing all the hard work. FL will only be remembered by customers as the grinches who removed this offering when it was so close if Dan's efforts don't get this set over the iine.

Where are the regular blog posts highlighting the value of these titles that FL are set to execute ? Those blog posts will potentially reach a customer audience beyond the forums that Dan on his own can not reach, not only vai the web but they will appear on the home pages of users who have blog posts turned on in the software.  

FL are not in a position to be claiming 'we' when they have done very little to actually get this or other titles over the line that they are going to remove from the prepub page very soon.

Posts 10110
Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 8 2017 12:04 PM | Locked

I have a feeling 'we' is Ben, not Faithlife. If it's like most companies, the rule myseriously floats down from the sky.

Plus the blog is political hot-topics.  They're busy saving the cosmos.


Posts 4905
DIsciple II | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 8 2017 12:43 PM | Locked

Denise:

I have a feeling 'we' is Ben, not Faithlife. If it's like most companies, the rule myseriously floats down from the sky.

Plus the blog is political hot-topics.  They're busy saving the cosmos.

I was trying to avoid directing my comments at Ben as an individual because he is on these forums  on an official company account acting as a spokesperson for FL.  But you are right Denise, unless the company's legal eagles have told Ben what to write, the comment did arise with the individual and not the company.

Posts 5248
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 8 2017 1:40 PM | Locked

A Different Look at the Lord’s Prayer

By Loren Rosson

Loren RossonWhen Christians pray the Our Father, they are usually praising God and asking for blessings.

But when Jesus’ disciples prayed it, they were asking for protection against disobedience–for God to keep them on a difficult straight-and-narrow.

The Disciples' Prayer

“The Disciples’ Prayer: The Prayer Jesus Taught in Its Historical Setting” by Jeffrey B. Gibson is available from the library in paperback.

So says Jeffrey Gibson in his hot-off-the-press analysis of what we call the Lord’s Prayer, but which he calls The Disciples’ Prayer since it was the disciples who prayed it. It’s an historical analysis that puts the prayer in its original context.

Gibson asks intriguing questions: Which version of the prayer is more reliable, Matthew’s (6:9-13) or Luke’s (11:2-4)? (He thinks Matthew’s). Did Jesus inherit the prayer from John the Baptist? (He says no.) Was the prayer like other Jewish future-looking prayers? (Not quite.)

The prayer emerges not so much as a plea for God to make his kingdom come, but to help the disciples maintain an obedience which the kingdom required.

To say “Our Father” was a confession of God’s lordship that pledged disciple loyalty whatever the cost. “Hallow your name” asked that the disciples not dishonor God through disobedience, even at the cost of their lives. The plea for “forgiveness” was about the principle of nonretaliation and the constraint to love enemies.

Loving enemies is always a tall order, but martyrdom (especially pacifist martyrdom) is terrifying.

There were Jewish resistance groups in the first century whose messiahs or leaders effectively preached, “an eye for an eye, with a rock through the head, too.” When the disciples were told to turn the other cheek, they weren’t being taught a cute Sunday-school metaphor, but rather to be merciful and even to succumb to martyrdom if it came to that.

The Disciples’ Prayer is a fascinating historical investigation, even for secularists like me. For Christians it carries the bonus of offering an alternative way of thinking about this famous prayer. Perhaps it was less about “praying down” the kingdom of God, and more about keeping oneself constrained to be worthy of it.

About  Loren Rosson

Loren Rosson heads up the circulation department at the Nashua Public Library. He's worked at the library since graduating from Lewis and Clark College, with the exception of the two years he spent in Lesotho with the Peace Corps, teaching high school.

Posts 5248
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 8 2017 2:00 PM | Locked


BOOK REVIEW
Warren, Meredith J.C., My Flesh Is Meat Indeed: A Nonsacramental
Reading of John 6:51-58 (Minneapolis: Fortress, 2015). 304 pp. Pbk.
USD44.00.


Meredith J.C. Warren completed her doctorate in New Testament and Early Judaism at McGill University in 2013, was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Ottawa, and is now Lecturer in Biblical and Religious Studies at the University of Sheffield. In this revised version of her doctoral dissertation, Warren examines Jn 6.51-58 from the view of the cultural expectation of cannibalism in the heroic tradition throughout Hellenistic literature in general and Greco-Roman romance novels in particular. The subtitle, ‘A Nonsacramental Reading of John 6.51-58’, suggests part of its aim. To counter the sacramental reading of scholars such as Rudolf Bultmann, Warren proposes a christological interpretation of Jn 6.51-58 ‘in light of the tension throughout the Gospel between the divinity and humanity of Jesus’ (p. 2). Warren considers Greco-Roman romance novels ‘as a window through which to view the Weltanschauung that to some extent shaped John’s approach to identifying divinity in Jesus’ (pp. 8, 246). Noting that these novels were probably composed after John’s Gospel, Warren suggests that they preserve a way of thinking about how divinity is conferred on extraordinary humans, a way of thinking that seems, from its prevalence dating back to the Homeric texts and continuing in popularity in the novels, to have survived and thrived through the time period in which John was writing (pp. 8, 246). 

Warren examines the development of literary tropes for identifying divinity in Hellenistic literature and compares these tropes with Jn 6.51c-58. Complementing her approach with theological interpretation and cultural expectation, Warren argues ‘Jesus’ exhortation to consume his flesh and drink his blood represents the contemporaneity of literary death and heroic cult aition in the same way that this reference to sacrificial death functions in the romances’ (p. 248). Furthermore,  it is in this statement of consumption and death at God’s behest that Jesus and God are identified, in the same way that first in the epics and later in the novels, the antagonistic gods become associated with heroes through the consumption of the cultic sacrificial meal (p. 248). This book consists of an introduction, four main chapters, and a conclusion. The introduction includes four sections: aim, method, main themes, and outlines. Its method contains two assumptions. First, John’s Gospel is a literary whole. And second, it is legitimate to compare the literary tropes and devices of John’s Gospel and the texts produced in the Greco-Roman world, as they are all part of Hellenistic literature. A brief definition of four main themes follows (1) ‘Ritual in Ink’ refers to a ritual that exists in a text but is not a real historical event; (2) ‘Contemporaneity’ is a term used by Bultmann and picked up by Warren to describe ‘the peculiar quality of Johannine time. John has no future: everything that occurs takes place in the present moment’ (p.10); (3) ‘Simultaneity’ is an ontological term proposed by Warren ‘that points to the intersection of multiple identities within the same being’ (p. 11); and (4) ‘Cannibalism and Anthropophagy’ usually describe ‘the consumption of human flesh by other humans’ (p. 13). Warren suggests that these themes ‘serve as a demarcator of social boundaries between right/insider and wrong/outsider’ (p. 13) but not of historical reality. The introduction ends with an outline of the book that is slightly different from the actual content. For greater clarity, it could have included an explanation of how the four main themes relate to each other and to the individual chapters.

Chapter 1, ‘“The Word Was Made Flesh” (John 1:14)’, starts with a discussion of Jesus’ divine and human identities and Christology in John, particularly in John 6, and narrows it to the controversial issues in 6.51-58 regarding whether the passage is an insertion and whether it is related to the Eucharist. Warren argues against both premises, opposing scholars such as Bultmann, Clark-Soles, Kümmel, Ruckstuhl and Dune. In view of Jesus’ identity as Son of God, she proposes to compare the antagonistic relationship between Jesus and God and between human and divine identities with what is experienced by heroes and heroines in heroic literature. She quotes Gregory Nagy who says that ‘antagonism between a hero and god in myth corresponds to the ritual requirements of symbiosis between hero and god in cult’ (p. 60). 


Chapter 2, ‘“Second Only to Artemis” (Leucippe and Clitophon 7.15)’, presents four relevant Greco-Roman romance novels: Chariton’s Chaereas and Callirhoe; Xenophon of Ephesus’s An Ephesian Tale; Achilles Tatius’s Leucippe and Clitophon; and Heliodorus’s An Ethiopian Story. Warren examines the development of the romance and the trope of divine epiphany to show how the heroines are described as goddesses in light of their associations with the classical heroes of the epics and the deity. 


Chapter 3, ‘“Her Viscera Leapt Out” (Leucippe and Clitophon 3.15)’, elaborates Nagy’s understanding of the hero–god relationship in Homeric literature and cult. Warren argues that human sacrifice and cannibalism in the cultural imagination achieves the climax of the association between the heroines and the deity to realize the ultimate antagonism and the identification with the divine. Thus, the chapter’s content is formed by topics such as ‘antagonism between heroes and gods’, ‘sacrifice in Greek and Roman religion’, ‘the sacrificial meal’, ‘human sacrifice in the Greek imagination’, ‘the function of cannibalism in antiquity’, ‘human sacrifice and implied cannibalism in the novels’, and ‘sacrifice and simultaneity’. 


Chapter 4, ‘“My Flesh is Meat Indeed” (John 6:55, KJV)’, concludes the findings from the previous chapters and argues further the identification of Jesus’ divinity upon the cannibalistic statement and the antagonistic relationship between Jesus and God. This antagonistic relationship is shown through the trope of antagonism, in that it was the intent of God to send Jesus down to earth to die on behalf of others. She borrows Lawrence Will’s literary comparison between Life of Aesop and John’s Gospel, which attempts to show the similarity between Aesop and Jesus regarding the pattern of alienation from the community, the expiatory death and the use of the antagonistic tropes (e.g. pharmakos), to demonstrate this antagonistic relationship. She concludes that Jesus’ divinity is identified simultaneously and contemporaneously in the conflation of Jesus’ literary death and God’s glory through the temporal convergence of Jesus’ literary death and cult aition, the anthropophagic statement. This statement also functions polemically as a boundary marker of factionalism but reverses the negative connotation of being barbaric (outsider) to being positive (insider), marking those who belong to Jesus. In the conclusion, ‘“Equal to God” (John 5:18; Iliad 20.447)’, Warren introduces two books to sustain her argument. First is Wayne 


Meeks’s Prophet-King: Moses Traditions and Johannine Christology. Warren aligns her Hellenistic view of Jesus’ dual characters, human and divine, with Meeks’s Jewish view of Jesus as prophet and king, to point to John’s Christology. However, this comparison seems misplaced. Besides the difference between characters, Meeks’s Christology is drawn from Jesus’ titles as prophet and king in the overall structure of the Gospel in Jewish tradition, but Warren focuses on Jesus’ humanity and divinity corresponding to Hellenistic heroic tradition. Another book she uses is Kasper Bro Larsen’s Recognizing the Stranger: Recognition Scenes and the Gospel of John. Warren associates her assumption with Larsen’s that John participates in the literary world of the ancient Mediterranean, and they both endorse ‘the interaction of Johannine Christology with the workings of the divine-mortal relationship in Greco-Roman religion’ (pp. 251-52). These correlations, which seem to ‘transfer’ the possibility of using the trope of the recognition scene (recognizing God through Jesus) to the trope of sacrifice as a divinizing act (identifying Jesus’ divine-mortal identity), are misguided. Even though Warren tries to benefit from Larsen’s work that examines a popular trope that occurs in both Greco-Roman and Jewish literature and is discussed in Aristotle’s Poetics (Larsen, pp. 20- 21), their differences in function make their usage text-specific rather than general. Whereas the trope of the recognition scene unveils the hidden identities, sacrifice as divinizing act identifies heroic divinity. Even though both tropes are about identification, their characteristics do not allow ‘transfer’ overall. 


The strengths of this book are several. Observed within the multicultural milieu of John’s Gospel, Warren’s attempt to deviate from both Christian and Jewish traditions and explore the human–divine relation through Hellenistic literature demonstrates her innovation in Johannine scholarship. Her investigation of tropes for identifying divinity from Homer to Greco-Roman romance novels arouses the awareness of a broad spectrum of religious texts in Hellenistic literature around Jesus’ time. Her study of ritual function in literature widens our understanding of it in literary culture. Several critiques need to be considered, however. One of the implied assumptions of the book is that all co-existing works of literature in the Greco-Roman world would be equally able to influence the development of John’s Gospel despite disparate ages, accessibility, authority in public or religious education, genres (classic epic poetry,  entertaining romance novel, philosophy, etc.) and compatibility of belief (monotheism or polytheism). In fact, these constraints limit the influence of other works on the shape of the Gospel. The influence of Greco-Roman romance novels needs first to overcome these constraints to secure the assumption.


Another problem is the incongruity between the context of a Hellenistic sacrificial trope and the plot in John 6. Jesus’ statement is proclaimed, while he is teaching in the Capernaum synagogue with the Jews. For several reasons, it is unlikely that John would communicate Jesus’ divinity in this way as used in Greek heroines within a Jewish setting, or to expect the reader to retrieve its reference from a Hellenistic romance novel. First, it is uncertain whether John knew this Hellenistic trope because the plot of cannibalism as sacrificial meal occurs only in one novel among the four examined by Warren and is initiated by bandits portrayed as taking out Leucippe’s viscera, but this ends up as a false-death (pp. 170, 190). Secondly, considering that Hellenistic sacrificial cult varied regarding localized heroes, communities and deities, it is more likely that even a Greek would associate Jesus, a Jew, with the Jews’ deity in a local synagogue if sacrificial overtones were detectable. As indication of this, John also portrays some Greeks as wanting to see Jesus in Jerusalem on their way to worship God (Jn 12.20-21). Further, Jn 6.51-58 could hardly trace an antagonistic relationship between Jesus and God. Rather, Jn 6.57 shows Jesus’ obedience to the Father. It would be too abrupt to interpret Jesus’ statement as ultimate antagonism to God. Additionally, the quoted heroic literature lacks the ‘life-giving’ aspect found in Jesus’ cannibalistic statement (Jn 6.51, 53-54, 57-58; cf. Jn 4.50-51, 53). More obvious is that there is no discussion of blood drinking, especially when blood in Judaism has the meaning of ‘life’ and when eating flesh and drinking blood are intertwined in this scene.


Lastly, the legitimacy of applying Bultmann’s concept of contemporaneity to Jn 6.51-58 is doubtful (pp. 10-11, 227-30). Bultmann means by ‘contemporaneity’ the convergence of present and future time within an eschatological event according to the particular text. In Jn 4.31-38, Bultmann interprets the overlapping of ‘waiting for four months’ and ‘now is ready for harvest’ as ‘seed-time’ and ‘harvest’ happening at the same moment as an eschatological event. Similarly, in Jn 12.27-33, the past and future are bound together regarding ‘now’ (v. 23) and ‘hour’ (vv. 27, 31), both of which refer to the hour of death as  the hour of glorifying God occurring at the time Jesus calls now. However, Jn 6.51-58 does not indicate any convergence of time. Conversely, Bultmann, in his book History and Eschatology, discusses the eschatological present in John’s Gospel and singles out some verses, such as Jn 5.28 and 6.51-58, as exceptions to traditional apocalyptic eschatology. Thus, Warren’s application is probably flawed. 

In conclusion, Warren’s work demonstrates the horizon of heroic tradition from Homeric literature to Greco-Roman romance novels and the preservation of cultural heritage of deity and ritual. Its content puts more weight on examining Hellenistic literature than the Gospel. Some inconsistencies in names occur. Some arguments are subject to interpretation. This book would be one of the resources for those who are interested in heroic romance literature and John’s Gospel. 


Tat Yu Lam
McMaster Divinity College
Hamilton, ON


Journal of Greco-Roman Christianity and Judaism

Posts 259
scooter | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 8 2017 2:04 PM | Locked

One big para.:  I thought about reading it, but thought my eyeballs might bleed.  So:no.

Posts 5248
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 8 2017 2:21 PM | Locked

scooter:

One big para.:  I thought about reading it, but thought my eyeballs might bleed.  So:no.

Sorry it looked better before I pushed post... I think I got it corrected now..

-Dan

Posts 259
scooter | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 8 2017 2:23 PM | Locked

Dan Francis:
I think I got it corrected now

Thanks, Dan.  Will read now.

Posts 5248
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 8 2017 2:40 PM | Locked

It's frustrating that Jesus' Sermon on the Mount: Mandating a Better Righteousness by Jack R. Lundbom is the book I am most interested in in this set but I have yet to come across a review.

-dan

Posts 861
LogosEmployee
Ben Amundgaard (Faithlife) | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 8 2017 3:22 PM | Locked

Disciple of Christ (doc):

Ben Amundgaard (Faithlife):

Dan Francis:

Ben Amundgaard (Faithlife):
I'm sorry for the confusion.

No backsies... Stick out tongue

Will try to convince more but not sure it will happen but God willing we will get it through.

-dan

It's really close again. I think with a little push we can get this over before 3/20.

There is no FL in 'we' of this effort Ben, it has been Dan doing all the hard work. FL will only be remembered by customers as the grinches who removed this offering when it was so close if Dan's efforts don't get this set over the iine.

Where are the regular blog posts highlighting the value of these titles that FL are set to execute ? Those blog posts will potentially reach a customer audience beyond the forums that Dan on his own can not reach, not only vai the web but they will appear on the home pages of users who have blog posts turned on in the software.  

FL are not in a position to be claiming 'we' when they have done very little to actually get this or other titles over the line that they are going to remove from the prepub page very soon.

Perhaps that was a misused pronoun, I wasn't trying to make an intentional statement. You're right that in this case the success of this collection is largely due to Dan's efforts.

However, I don't think it's fair to say that we haven't done anything to promote this collection (or other collections that we are planning to cancel). This book has been up on pre-pub for almost 2 years. We've promoted it through the same channels we promote every other pre-pub. Further, we posted a notification here on the forum and are sending out some more emails informing customers that if they don't get their orders in this product it will be cancelled. Part of the philosophy of pre-pub is that if we don't get enough orders to produce a book, we don't produce it.

It is in our best interest to get this collection produced. Cancelling it means cancelling the revenue attached to all the pre-pub orders. However, we've learned over the past few years that it's important to not let titles linger on pre-pub for too long.

Manager, Bible Study Products Department

Posts 5248
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 9 2017 10:49 AM | Locked

If my ruler is correct we are 99% there, thank you for all you have joined in, I hope we all enjoy the books if they make it. For others on the fence please consider them i think they will be a blessing (yes some more than others). We are close to getting them under contract and have about 10 days (or 7 in reality since it was stated on another thread March 16  is the magic date). I know not every offering is able to be saved of the items on the chopping block but this set seems to be one worth it in my eyes.

-dan

Posts 915
David Carter | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 9 2017 11:59 AM | Locked

Dan Francis:
If my ruler is correct we are 99% there, thank you for all you have joined in, I hope we all enjoy the books if they make it.

It's gone green (again!) on my screen. Hopefully it will stay green this time

Posts 4905
DIsciple II | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 10 2017 1:58 AM | Locked

Ben I tried not to make imy initial comment on this issue about you as an individual, another customer brought you as an individual directly into the comment. But now you have come at me as an individual and have been unfair by taking my comments about FL's actions since you announced this title was in danger of being cancelled and suggested I was talking about FL's actions from the time this, and other titles were added as pre-pubs. You don't have to agree with my views but twisting my words is not an appropriate way to respond to our difference of view.

Ben Amundgaard (Faithlife):

Disciple of Christ (doc):

Ben Amundgaard (Faithlife):

Dan Francis:

Ben Amundgaard (Faithlife):
I'm sorry for the confusion.

No backsies... Stick out tongue

Will try to convince more but not sure it will happen but God willing we will get it through.

-dan

It's really close again. I think with a little push we can get this over before 3/20.

There is no FL in 'we' of this effort Ben, it has been Dan doing all the hard work. FL will only be remembered by customers as the grinches who removed this offering when it was so close if Dan's efforts don't get this set over the iine.

Where are the regular blog posts highlighting the value of these titles that FL are set to execute ? Those blog posts will potentially reach a customer audience beyond the forums that Dan on his own can not reach, not only vai the web but they will appear on the home pages of users who have blog posts turned on in the software.  

FL are not in a position to be claiming 'we' when they have done very little to actually get this or other titles over the line that they are going to remove from the prepub page very soon.

Perhaps that was a misused pronoun, I wasn't trying to make an intentional statement. You're right that in this case the success of this collection is largely due to Dan's efforts.

However, I don't think it's fair to say that we haven't done anything to promote this collection (or other collections that we are planning to cancel). This book has been up on pre-pub for almost 2 years. We've promoted it through the same channels we promote every other pre-pub. Further, we posted a notification here on the forum and are sending out some more emails informing customers that if they don't get their orders in this product it will be cancelled. Part of the philosophy of pre-pub is that if we don't get enough orders to produce a book, we don't produce it.

It is in our best interest to get this collection produced. Cancelling it means cancelling the revenue attached to all the pre-pub orders. However, we've learned over the past few years that it's important to not let titles linger on pre-pub for too long.

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