Why don't Standard Lesson Commentaries show in Passage Guide Results

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Ralph Wood | Forum Activity | Posted: Sat, Mar 11 2017 1:17 PM

My primary use of Logos is to prepare for teaching an adult Sunday School class.  I purchased several volumes of the Standard Lesson Commentaries to supplement my teaching preparation.  Despite prioritizing these resources high on my list, they don't appear in my Passage Guide results.  Why?

Thanks.

Posts 5248
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Mar 11 2017 4:32 PM

I don't have the year books but dr. outlay's books populate right id this close to what you should have??? :

2:1 Either verses 1–7 or 1–10 form one sentence in Greek, with the main verb in v. 5. It is one sustained argument. Paul’s presentation includes (1) the hopelessness, helplessness, and spiritual lostness of all mankind, vv. 1–3; (2) the unmerited grace of God, vv. 4–7; and (3) the necessary human response, faith and life, vv. 8–10.

© “you” In Colossians and Ephesians this PLURAL PRONOUN always refers to believing Gentiles (cf. 1:13; 2:12).

© “were dead” This is a PRESENT ACTIVE PARTICIPLE meaning “being dead.” This refers to spiritual death (cf. v. 5; Rom. 5:12ff; Col. 2:13). The Bible speaks of three stages of death: (1) spiritual death (cf. Gen. 2:17; 3; Isa. 59:2; Rom. 7; 10–11; James 1:15); (2) physical death (cf. Gen. 5); and (3) eternal death, called “the second death” (cf. Rev. 2:11; 20:6, 14; 21:8).

© “trespasses” This Greek term (paraptōma) means “falling to one side” (cf. 1:7). All Greek words for “sins” are related to the Hebrew concept of deviation from the standard of God’s righteousness. The term “right,” “just,” and their derivatives in Hebrew are from a construction metaphor for a measuring reed. God is the standard. All humans deviate from that standard (cf. Ps. 14:1–3; 5:9; 10:7; 36:1; 53:1–4; 140:3; Isa. 53:6; 59:7–8; Rom. 3:9–23; 1 Pet. 2:25).

© “sins” This Greek term (hamartia) means “missing the mark” (cf. 4:26). The two terms for sin in verse 1 are used as synonyms to illustrate mankind’s fallen, estranged condition (cf. Rom. 3:9, 19, 23; 11:32; Gal. 3:22).

2:2 “in which you formerly walked” “Walk” is a biblical metaphor for lifestyle (cf. 2:1, 10; 4:1, 17; 5:2, 8, 15).

©

NASB, NKJV

“according to the course of this world”

NRSV

“following the course of this world”

TEV

“followed the world’s evil way”

NJB

“living by the principles of this world”

This current fallen world system is personified as an enemy (cf. Gal. 1:4). It is fallen mankind attempting to meet all needs apart from God. In John’s writing it is called “the world” (cf. 1 John 2:2, 15–17; 3:1, 13, 17; 4:1–17; 5:4, 5, 19) or “Babylon” (cf. Rev. 14:8; 16:19; 17:5; 18:2, 10, 21). In our modern terminology it is called “atheistic humanism.” See Special Topic: Paul’s Use of Kosmos at Col. 1:6.

©

NASB, NKJV

“according to the prince of the power of the air”

NRSV

“following the rules of the power of the air”

TEV

“you obeyed the ruler of the spiritual powers in space”

NJB

“obeying the ruler who governs the air”

This is the second enemy of fallen mankind, Satan, the accuser. Mankind is subjected to a personal angelic tempter (cf. Gen. 3, Job. 1–2, Zech. 3). He is called the ruler or god of this world (cf. John 12:31; 14:30; 16:11; 2 Cor. 4:4; 1 John 5:19).

In the NT the air is the realm of the demonic. The lower air (aēr) was seen by th Greeks to be impure and therefore the domain of evil spirits. Some see this use of “air” as referring to the immaterial nature of the spiritual realm. The concept of “the rapture of the church” comes from the Latin translation of 1 Thess. 4:17, “caught up.” Christians are going to meet the Lord in the midst of Satan’s kingdom, “the air,” to show its overthrow!

SPECIAL TOPIC: PERSONAL EVIL

This is a very difficult subject for several reasons:

1. The OT does not reveal an arch enemy to good, but a servant of YHWH who offers mankind an alternative and accuses mankind of unrighteousness.

2. The concept of a personal arch enemy of God developed in the inter-biblical (non-canonical) literature under the influence of Persian religion (Zoroastrianism). This, in turn, greatly influenced rabbinical Judaism.

3. The NT develops the OT themes in surprisingly stark, but selective, categories.

If one approaches the study of evil from the perspective of biblical theology (each book or author or genre studied and outlined separately) then very different views of evil are revealed.

If, however, one approaches the study of evil from a non-biblical or extra-biblical approach of world religions or eastern religions then much of the NT development is foreshadowed in Persian dualism and Greco-Roman spiritism.

If one is presuppositionally committed to the divine authority of Scripture, then the NT development must be seen as progressive revelation. Christians must guard against allowing Jewish folk lore or English literature (i.e. Dante, Milton) to further clarify the concept. There is certainly mystery and ambiguity in this area of revelation. God has chosen not to reveal all aspects of evil, its origin, its purpose, but He has revealed its defeat!

In the OT the term Satan or accuser seems to relate to three separate groups:

1. human accusers (1 Sam. 29:4; 2 Sam. 19:22; 1 Kgs. 11:14, 23, 25; Ps. 109:6)

2. angelic accusers (Num. 22:22–23; Zech. 3:1)

3. demonic accusers (1 Chr. 21:1; 1 Kgs. 22:21; Zech. 13:2)

Only later in the intertestamental period is the serpent of Gen. 3 identified with Satan (cf. Book of Wisdom 2:23–24; 2 Enoch 31:3), and even later does this become a rabbinical option (cf. Sot 9b and Sanh. 29a). The “sons of God” of Gen. 6 become angels in 1 Enoch 54:6. I mention this, not to assert its theological accuracy, but to show its development. In the NT these OT activities are attributed to angelic, personified evil (i.e. Satan) in 2 Cor. 11:3; Rev. 12:9.

The origin of personified evil is difficult or impossible (depending on your point of view) to determine from the OT. One reason for this is Israel’s strong monotheism (cf. 1 Kgs. 22:20–22; Eccl. 7:14; Isa. 45:7; Amos 3:6). All causality was attributed to YHWH to demonstrate His uniqueness and primacy (cf. Isa. 43:11; 44:6, 8, 24; 45:5–6, 14, 18, 21, 22).

Sources of possible information are focusing on (1) Job 1–2 where Satan is one of the “sons of God” (i.e. angels) or (2) Isa. 14; Ezek. 28 where prideful near eastern kings (Babylon and Tyre) are used to illustrate the pride of Satan (cf. 1 Tim. 3:6). I have mixed emotions about this approach. Ezekiel uses Garden of Eden metaphors not only of the king of Tyre as Satan (cf. Ezek. 28:12–16), but also for the king of Egypt as the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil (Ezek. 31). However, Isa. 14, particularly vv. 12–14, seems to describe an angelic revolt through pride. If God wanted to reveal to us the specific nature and origin of Satan this is a very oblique way and place to do it. We must guard against the trend of systematic theology of taking small, ambiguous parts of different testaments, authors, books, and genres and combining them as pieces of one divine puzzle.

Alfred Edersheim (The Life and Times of Jesus the Messiah, vol. 2, appendices XIII [pp. 748–763] and XVI [pp. 770–776]) that Rabbinical Judaism has been overly influenced by Persian dualism and demonic speculation. The rabbis are not a good source for truth in this area. Jesus radically diverges from the teachings of the Synagogue. I think that the rabbinical concept of angelic mediation and opposition in the giving of the law to Moses on Mt. Sinai opened the door to the concept of an arch-angelic enemy of YHWH as well as mankind. The two high gods of Iranian (Zoroastrian) dualism, Ahkiman and Ormaza, good and evil, and this developed into a Judaic dualism of YHWH and Satan.

There is surely progressive revelation in the NT as to the development of evil, but not as elaborate as the rabbis. A good example of this difference is the “war in heaven.” The fall of Satan is a logical necessity, but the specifics are not given. Even what is given is veiled in apocalyptic genre (cf. Rev. 12:4, 7, 12–13). Although Satan is defeated and exiled to earth, he still functions as a servant of YHWH (cf. Matt. 4:1; Luke 22:31–32; 1 Cor. 5:5; 1 Tim. 1:20).

We must curb our curiosity in this area. There is a personal force of temptation and evil, but there is still only one God and mankind is still responsible for his/her choices. There is a spiritual battle, both before and after salvation. Victory can only come and remain in and through the Triune God. Evil has been defeated and will be removed!

©

NASB, NKJV

“in the sons of disobedience”

NRSV

“among those who are disobedient”

TEV

“the people who disobey God”

NJB

“in the rebellious”

This was a Hebrew idiom for rebellion and settled character (cf. 5:6).

2:3 “we too all formerly lived” In Ephesians “we” refers to the Jewish believers, in this case, Paul and his ministry team. The ending phrase “even as the rest,” makes it possible that this phrase refers to all of the OT chosen people, the Jews. This verb is an AORIST PASSIVE INDICATIVE. The PASSIVE VOICE would emphasize that fallen mankind was being manipulated by outside evil spiritual forces, like Satan or the demonic, mentioned in v. 2 and 3:10; 6:12.

©

NASB, NKJV

“in the lusts of our flesh”

NRSV

“in the passions of our flesh”

TEV

“according to our natural desires”

NJB

“sensual lives”

This is the third enemy of fallen man. Although it is not listed in a grammatically parallel structure (“according to …”) with the two enemies in v. 2, it is a theological parallel. Mankind’s fallen, egocentristic self is its worst enemy (cf. Gal. 5:19–21). It twists and manipulates everything and everyone to one’s own self interest (cf. Rom. 7:14–25).

Paul uses the term “flesh” in two distinct ways. Only context can determine the distinction. In 2:11, 14; 5:29, 31; 6:5 and 12 it means “the human person,” not “the fallen sin nature” as here.

©

NASB

“indulging the desires of the flesh and of the mind”

NKJV

“fulfilling the desires of the flesh and of the mind”

NRSV

“following the desires of the flesh and senses”

TEV

“and did whatever suited the wishes of our own bodies and minds”

NJB

“ruled entirely by our own physical desires and our own ideas”

This is a PRESENT ACTIVE PARTICIPLE which emphasizes continual, on-going, habitual action. The human body and the mind are not evil in and of themselves, but they are the battleground of temptation and sin (cf. 4:17–19; Rom. 6 & 7).

© “by nature” This refers to mankind’s fallen, Adamic propensities (cf. Gen. 3; Ps. 51:5; Job 14:4; Rom. 5:12–21; 7:14–25). It is surprising that the rabbis in general do not emphasize the fall of humanity in Gen. 3. They instead assert that mankind has two intents (yetzers), one good, one bad. Humans are dominated by their choices. There is a famous rabbinical proverb: “Every man has a black and a white dog in his heart. The one he feeds the most is the one that becomes the biggest.” However, the NT presents several theological reasons for mankind’s sin (1) the fall of Adam, (2) willful ignorance and (3) sinful choices.

© “children of wrath,” “Children of …” like “sons of …” is an Hebraic idiomatic phrase for a person’s character. God is opposed to sin and rebellion in His creation. The wrath of God is both temporal (in time) and eschatological (at the end of time).

©

NASB

“even as the rest”

NKJV

“made us sit together”

TEV

“like everyone else”

NJB

“as the rest of the world”

This refers to the lostness of all humans, both Jew and Gentile (cf. Rom. 1:18–3:21). Paul often uses the term “rest” to refer to the lost (cf. 1 Thess. 4:13; 5:6).

2:4 “But God, being rich in mercy, because of His great love with which He loved us” There is such a dramatic switch between the hopelessness and helplessness of vv. 1–3 and the marvelous grace and mercy of God in vv. 4–7.

What a great truth! God’s mercy and love are the keys to salvation (cf. v. 7). It is His character, not mankind’s performance, that offers a way of righteousness.

It is significant that this verse on God’s grace contains a PRESENT PARTICIPLE and an AORIST ACTIVE INDICATIVE. God has loved us in the past and continues to love us (cf. 1 John 4:10)!

2:5 “even when we were dead in our transgressions,” This phrase is parallel to v. 1a. Paul returns to his original thought after his parenthetical thought (cf. vv. 1–3) about the lostness of mankind. In the midst of our need, God acted in love (cf. Rom. 5:6, 8).

© “made us alive together with Christ” This English phrase reflects one Greek word (suzōpoieō). This is the main verb of the sentence (AORIST ACTIVE INDICATIVE) which begins in v. 1. This is the first of three compound verbs with the Greek preposition, syn which meant “joint participation with.” Jesus was raised from the dead in 1:20 and believers have been quickened to spiritual life through Him (cf. Col. 2:13). Believers are now truly alive with Christ.

© 2:5, 8 “you have been saved” This is a PERFECT PASSIVE PERIPHRASTIC PARTICIPLE. This meant that believers have been saved in the past, by an outside agent, with abiding results; “they have been and continue to be saved by God.” This same construction is repeated in v. 8 for emphasis. See Special Topic at Eph. 1:7.

This is one of the biblical passages which forms the basis for the doctrine of the security of the believer (cf. John 6:37, 39; 10:28; 17:2, 24; 18:9; Rom. 8:31–39). Like all biblical doctrines, it must be balanced (held in tension) with other truths and texts.

2:6 “raised us with Him” This is the second of the AORIST compounds with syn. Believers have already been raised with Christ. Believers were buried with Him in baptism (cf. Col. 2:12) and raised with Him by the Father (cf. Col. 2:13) who raised Jesus (raised by the Spirit in Rom. 8:11). These are special redemptive analogies. Believers spiritually participate in the major events of Jesus’ experience: crucifixion, death, burial, resurrection and enthronement! Believers share His life and suffering; they will also share His glory (cf. Rom. 8:17)!

©

NASB, NRSV

“seated us with Him”

NKJV

“made us sit together”

TEV

“to rule with him”

NJB

“gave us a place with him”

This is the third of the AORIST compounds with syn. Our position in Him is one of present, as well as future, victory (cf. Rom. 8:37)! The concept of sitting down with Him meant reigning with Him. Jesus is the King of Kings sitting on the throne of God the Father and believers are even now co-reigning with Him (cf. Matt. 19:28; Rom. 5:17; Col. 3:1; 2 Tim. 2:12; Rev. 22:5).

©

NASB, NKJV, NRSV

“in the heavenly places

TEV

“in the heavenly world”

NJB

“in heaven”

This LOCATIVE (of sphere) NEUTER PLURAL ADJECTIVE, “in the heavenly places,” is only used in Ephesians (cf. 1:20; 2:6; 3:10; 6:12). From the context of all of its usages, it must mean the spiritual realm in which believers live here and now, not heaven.

2:7 “in the ages to come” The Jews believed in two ages, the current evil age (Gal. 1:4) and the coming righteous age (see Special Topic at 1:21). This New Age of righteousness would be inaugurated by the coming of the Messiah in the power of the Spirit. In 1:20 “age” is SINGULAR, here it is PLURAL (cf. 1 Cor 2:7; Heb. 1:2; 11:3). This implies that (1) there are at least two ages, or (2) the plural is used to accentuate and magnify the coming age—a rabbinical idiom called a “plural of majesty.” This use of the plural in a symbolic sense can be seen in the passages that refer to the past “ages” (cf. Rom. 16:25; 1 Cor. 10:11; 2 Tim. 1:9; Titus 1:2).

Some scholars believe this was simply a metaphor for eternity because of the way the phrase was used in secular Koine Greek and in several places in the NT (cf. Luke 1:33, 55; John 12:34; Rom. 9:5; Gal. 1:5; 1 Tim. 1:17).

© “He might show” This is an AORIST MIDDLE SUBJUNCTIVE. God clearly manifested His own character (cf. 1:5–7). This term means “to publicly display” (cf. Rom. 9:17, 22). God’s mercy and purpose in Christ are clearly manifested to the angels by His treatment of fallen mankind (cf. 3:10; 1 Cor. 4:9; 1 Pet. 1:12).

2:8 “For by grace” Salvation is by the “grace” of God (cf. Eph. 1:3–14). The character of God is revealed through His mercy (cf. vv. 4–6). Believers are the trophies of His love. Grace is best defined as the unmerited, undeserved love of God. It flows from God’s nature through Christ and is irrespective of the worth or merit of the one loved.

© “you have been saved” This is a PERFECT PASSIVE PERIPHRASTIC PARTICIPLE which is parallel with v. 5. Its thrust is that “believers have been and continue to be” saved by God.

In the OT the term “save” spoke of “physical deliverance” (cf. James 5:15). In the NT this meaning has taken on a spiritual dimension. God delivers believers from the results of sin and gives them eternal life.

© “through faith” Faith receives God’s free gift in Christ (cf. Rom. 3:22, 25; 4:5; 9:30; Gal. 2:16; 1 Pet. 1:5). Mankind must respond to God’s offer of grace and forgiveness in Christ (cf. John 1:12; 3:16–17, 36; 6:40; 11:25–26; Rom. 10:9–13).

God deals with fallen mankind by means of a covenant. He always takes the initiative (cf. John 6:44, 65) and sets the agenda and the boundaries (cf. Mark 1:15; Acts 20:21). He allows fallen mankind to participate in their own salvation by responding to His covenant offer. The mandated response is initial and continuing faith, repentance, obedience, service, worship, and perseverance.

The term “faith” in the OT is a metaphorical extension of a stable stance. It came to denote that which is sure, trustworthy, dependable and faithful. None of these describe even redeemed fallen mankind. It is not mankind’s trustworthiness, or faithfulness or dependability, but God’s. We trust in His trustworthy promises, not our trustworthiness! Covenant obedience flows from gratitude! The focus has always been on His faithfulness, not the believers’ faith!. Faith cannot save anyone. Only grace saves, but it is received by faith. The focus is never on the amount of faith (cf. Matt. 17:20), but on its object (Jesus).

© “and that” This is the Greek DEMONSTRATIVE PRONOUN (touto), which is NEUTER in GENDER. The closest nouns, “grace” and “faith,” are both FEMININE in GENDER. Therefore, this must refer to the whole process of our salvation in the finished work of Christ.

There is another possibility based on a similar grammatical construction in Phil. 1:28. If this is the case then this adverbial phrase relates to faith, which is also a gift of God’s grace! Here is the mystery of God’s sovereignty and human free will.

© “not of yourselves” This is the first of three phrases which clearly show that salvation is not based on human performance: (1) “not of yourselves” v. 8; (2) “gift of God” v. 8; and (3) “not as a result of works” v. 9.

© “the gift of God” This is the essence of grace—love with no strings attached (cf. Rom. 3:24; 6:23). The paradox of salvation as both a free gift and a mandated covenant response are difficult to grasp. Yet both are true! Salvation is truly free, yet costs everything. Most biblical doctrines are presented as tension-filled pairs of truths (security vs. perseverance, faith vs. works, God’s sovereignty vs. human free will, predestination vs. human response and transcendence vs. immanence).

2:9 “not as a result of works,” Salvation is not by merit (cf. Rom. 3:20, 27–28; 9:11, 16; Gal. 2:16; Phil 3:9; 2 Tim. 1:9; Titus 3:5). This is in direct contrast to the false teachers.

© “so that no one may boast” Salvation is by God’s grace, not human effort, so there is no room for human glorying (cf. Rom. 3:27; 4:2). If believers boast, let them boast in Christ (cf. 1 Cor. 1:31).

2:10 “we are His workmanship,” The English word “poem” comes from this Greek term (poiēma). This word is only used two times in the NT, here and Rom. 1:20. This is the believers’ position in grace. They are paradoxically His finished product which is still in process!

© “created in Christ Jesus” This is an AORIST PASSIVE PARTICIPLE. The Spirit forms believers through Christ’s ministry by the will of the Father (cf. 1:3–14). This act of a new spiritual creation is described in the same terms used of the initial creation in Genesis (cf. 3:9; Col. 1:16).

© “for good works” Believers’ lifestyles after they meet Christ are an evidence of their salvation (cf. James and I John). They are saved by grace through faith unto works! They are saved to serve! Faith without works is dead, as are works without faith (cf. Matt. 7:21–23 and James 2:14–26). The goal of the Father’s choice is that believers be “holy and blameless” (cf. 1:4).

Paul was often attacked for his radically free gospel because it seemed to encourage godless living. A gospel so seemingly unconnected to moral performance must lead to abuse. Paul’s gospel was free in the grace of God, but it also demanded an appropriate response, not only in initial repentance, but in ongoing repentance. Godly living is the result, not lawlessness. Good works are not the mechanism of salvation, but the result. This paradox of a completely free salvation and a cost-everything response is difficult to communicate, but the two must be held in a tension-filled balance.

American individualism has distorted the gospel. Humans are not saved because God loves them so much individually, but because God loves fallen mankind, mankind made in His image. He saves and changes individuals to reach more individuals. The ultimate focus of love is primarily corporate (cf. John 3:16), but it is received individually (cf. John 1:12; Rom. 10:9–13; 1 Cor. 15:1).

© “which God prepared beforehand” This strong term (pro + hetoimos, “to prepare before”) relates to the theological concept of predestination (cf. 1:4–5, 11) and is used only here and in Rom. 9:23. God chose a people to reflect His character. Through Christ, the Father has restored His image in fallen mankind (cf. Gen. 1:26–27).

NASB New American Standard Bible

NKJV New King James Version

NRSV New Revised Standard Version

TEV Today’s English Version

NJB New Jerusalem Bible

NASB New American Standard Bible

NKJV New King James Version

NRSV New Revised Standard Version

TEV Today’s English Version

NJB New Jerusalem Bible

NASB New American Standard Bible

NKJV New King James Version

NRSV New Revised Standard Version

TEV Today’s English Version

NJB New Jerusalem Bible

NASB New American Standard Bible

NKJV New King James Version

NRSV New Revised Standard Version

TEV Today’s English Version

NJB New Jerusalem Bible

NASB New American Standard Bible

NKJV New King James Version

NRSV New Revised Standard Version

TEV Today’s English Version

NJB New Jerusalem Bible

NASB New American Standard Bible

NKJV New King James Version

TEV Today’s English Version

NJB New Jerusalem Bible

NASB New American Standard Bible

NRSV New Revised Standard Version

NKJV New King James Version

TEV Today’s English Version

NJB New Jerusalem Bible

NASB New American Standard Bible

NKJV New King James Version

NRSV New Revised Standard Version

TEV Today’s English Version

NJB New Jerusalem Bible

 Robert James Utley, Paul Bound, the Gospel Unbound: Letters from Prison (Colossians, Ephesians and Philemon, Then Later, Philippians), vol. Volume 8, Study Guide Commentary Series (Marshall, TX: Bible Lessons International, 1997), 84–89.

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Kyle G. Anderson | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 13 2017 9:09 AM

In order to appear in the Passage Guide, these resources would need to be classified as a "Bible Commentary" as their resource type. Because they do not follow our guidelines for what can be classified as a Bible Commentary, they are a monograph type.

Posts 56
Ralph Wood | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 14 2017 8:15 AM

Thanks, Kyle.  Makes sense.

Posts 82
Kristine Lewis | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 14 2017 11:22 AM

You could try making a Collection that includes your Standard Lesson Commentaries, and then include that named Collection in a custom Passage Guide linked to your bible passage.

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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 14 2017 1:32 PM

Kristine Lewis:

You could try making a Collection that includes your Standard Lesson Commentaries, and then include that named Collection in a custom Passage Guide linked to your bible passage.

See Kyle's comment, above.

Dave
===

Windows & Android

Posts 82
Kristine Lewis | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 14 2017 1:48 PM

Edit: I now see the Standard Lesson Commentaries may not monographs, but single volume bible commentaries:

https://www.logos.com/product/53057/esv-standard-lesson-commentary-2015-2016
https://www.logos.com/product/122912/esv-standard-lesson-commentary-2016-2017and also the KJV and NIV versions for these recent editions.  Older editions may be monographs.

I find making a Collection of Monographs and adding it to a custom Passage Guide is convenient when studying a bible passage and finding the passage discussed in a monograph.  I believe Standard Lesson Commentaries could be made into a collection and used this way, though I do not own Standard Lesson Commentaries.

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NB.Mick | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 15 2017 8:07 AM

Kristine Lewis:

Edit: I now see the Standard Lesson Commentaries may not monographs, but single volume bible commentaries:

https://www.logos.com/product/53057/esv-standard-lesson-commentary-2015-2016
https://www.logos.com/product/122912/esv-standard-lesson-commentary-2016-2017and also the KJV and NIV versions for these recent editions.  Older editions may be monographs.

No, that's unfortunately not the case. The logos.com shop website lists them as such, but technically they are still 'monographs'. 

The point is the internal index, which is according to page number and date, not according to bible references. You can navigate to the section for March 12, but not to the section on Eph 2 - thus Faithlife could easily make a calendar devotional out of the monograph, but in order to make them commentaries or even bible notes, a bible index would be needed:

 

This would be a helpful idea for a PB of type "bible commentary" which could contain links to those (like Richard Wilson's "Index of Bible Studies" for other non-versified commentaries - which currently seems not to contain the Standard Lesson Commentaries) 

Running Logos 8 latest beta version on Win 10

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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 16 2017 12:17 PM

Kristine Lewis:
I find making a Collection of Monographs and adding it to a custom Passage Guide is convenient when studying a bible passage and finding the passage discussed in a monograph.

The distinction is that monographs like SLC be included in the Collections section and not the Commentaries section. The passage referenced may not be the point of a discussion e.g. it may be mentioned in support of another article.

Dave
===

Windows & Android

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