NIV Study Bible?

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Rich DeRuiter | Forum Activity | Posted: Fri, Mar 24 2017 6:56 AM

Now that Faithlife has partnered with Zondervan to publish a paper version of the Faithlife Study Bible, how about leveraging that partnership to bring the NIV Study Bible into Logos. (No. I don't mean the Zondervan NIV Study Bible, which is a completely different product.)

We've been asking for this study Bible for years, and I've asked for it many times. I have it the 2011 edition in paper, and it's both excellent and beautiful. If just for Stek on the Psalms, this is one of the best study Bibles out there. I would love to have it in the Logos environment, and don't mind paying twice to get it (paper, plus digital).

So, how about it, Faithlife? Is the time ripe for closing this deal?

Please?

 Help links: WIKI;  Logos 6 FAQ. (Phil. 2:14, NIV)

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Daniel Yoder | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 24 2017 7:10 AM

I agree.  This would be great to have in Logos.  

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Ben | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 24 2017 7:13 AM

How are they different?

"The whole modern world has divided itself into Conservatives and Progressives. The business of Progressives is to go on making mistakes. The business of Conservatives is to prevent mistakes from being corrected."- G.K. Chesterton

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Rodney Phillips | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 24 2017 7:25 AM

Was about to ask the same question.,

This is the one I went with for my hard copy bible.   

https://www.amazon.com/Zondervan-NIV-Study-Bible/dp/0310929555/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1490365063&sr=8-3&keywords=Zondervan+NIV+Study+Bible

2002 version. Decided the newer versions have some changes I dont really want..

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Rich DeRuiter | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 24 2017 7:43 AM

Ben:

How are they different?

I assume you mean how are the Zondervan NIV Study Bible (ZNIVSB) vs the NIV Study Bible (NIVSB) different from each other.

Both use the NIV 2011 text as their base text (let's not debate the merits/faults of that translation, please).

The NIVSB is an incremental updating of the classic NIV Study Bible that used the NIV84. It's edited by Kenneth Barker, as was the earlier version.

The ZNIVSB is edited by D.A.Carson, and is a completely new effort.

I've not spent a lot of time comparing the two. Maybe others could say more. I've had and NIVSB for decades and have greatly appreciated it, for it's concise explanations of details in the text (grammatical, verbal, cultural, etc.), with an intent to fairly represent the major differing interpretations (e.g. "Some say... Others say... Still others say...").  

When I very, very briefly compared the two, I saw the differences, and decided the newer ZNIVSB was not the one I wanted for my take-along-to-Bible-study Bible. I found the ZNIVSB to be inferior, to the NIVSB in the places I compared, but I didn't do an extensive comparison, as I said.

There's a YouTube video out there that compares the two. It's one guys perspective, and he seems to spend a lot of time talking about fonts, page formatting and readability (much of which disappears in the Logos environment anyway, since we only get the notes). The ZNIVSB seems to have more text, longer perhaps more extensive notes (I really didn't look that close). For some that's an advantage. And for Carson fans, the ZNIVSB is probably a no-brainer.

More importantly, Logos has all the other major study Bibles. This one deserves to be in the Logos environment too.

 Help links: WIKI;  Logos 6 FAQ. (Phil. 2:14, NIV)

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JT (alabama24) | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 24 2017 7:48 AM

Ben:
How are they different?

They are completely different resources. The NIVSB is (according to Zondervan) "the world's best selling study bible." The NIV Zondervan Study Bible (NIVZSB) is completely new, and not based on the other. I believe the differences between the one Rich (2011) and Rodney (2002) mentioned are largely the base text (NIV84 vs. NIV11), but they are considered different editions of the same resource. 

The edition Rodney has in print is highly unlikely to come to Logos. The one Rich mentioned is a possibility... maybe. 

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Rich DeRuiter | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 24 2017 7:58 AM

alabama24:
The edition Rodney has in print is highly unlikely to come to Logos. The one Rich mentioned is a possibility... maybe. 

"You do not have, because you do not ask."

I'm asking...again.

You're right, the edition that uses the NIV84 as its base text is not at all likely to come into the Logos system. However, apart from any debate on the NIV2011 translation itself, the NIVSB notes are, IMHO, even better than the older version notes.

 Help links: WIKI;  Logos 6 FAQ. (Phil. 2:14, NIV)

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Rodney Phillips | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 24 2017 8:08 AM

Learned a lot about the NIV from this post guys.. Thanks.. 

Always been confused over the NIV and versions etc..   

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HansK | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 24 2017 8:41 AM

Here is NIV SB (2002) on Gen 1:1-3:

1:1  A summary statement introducing the six days of creative activity (see note on 2:1). The truth of this majestic verse was joyfully affirmed by poet (Ps 102:25) and prophet (Isa 40:21). In the beginning God. The Bible always assumes, and never argues, God’s existence. Although everything else had a beginning, God has always been (Ps 90:2). In the beginning. Jn 1:1-10, which stresses the work of Christ in creation, opens with the same phrase. God created. “God” renders the common Hebrew noun Elohim. It is plural but the verb is singular, a normal usage in the OT when reference is to the one true God. This use of the plural expresses intensification rather than number and has been called the plural of majesty, or of potentiality. In the OT the Hebrew verb for “create” is used only of divine, never of human, activity. the heavens and the earth. “All things” (Isa 44:24). That God created everything is also taught in Ecc 11:5; Jer 10:16; Jn 1:3; Col 1:16; Heb 1:2. The positive, life oriented teaching of v. 1 is beautifully summarized in Isa 45:18.

1:2  earth. The focus of this account. formless and empty. The phrase, which appears elsewhere only in Jer 4:23, gives structure to the rest of the chapter (see note on v. 11). God’s “separating” and “gathering” on days 1-3 gave form, and his “making” and “filling” on days 4-6 removed the emptiness. darkness ... the waters. Completes the picture of a world awaiting God’s light giving, order making and life creating word. and. Or “but.” The awesome (and, for ancient people, fearful) picture of the original state of the visible creation is relieved by the majestic announcement that the mighty Spirit of God hovers over creation. The announcement anticipates God’s creative words that follow. Spirit of God. He was active in creation, and his creative power continues today (see Job 33:4; Ps 104:30). hovering over. Like an eagle that hovers over its young when they are learning to fly (see Dt 32:11; cf. Isa 31:5).

1:3  God said. Merely by issuing his royal decree, God brought all things into being (Ps 33:6, 9; 148:5; Heb 11:3). Let there be light. God’s first creative word called forth light in the midst of the primeval darkness. Light is necessary for making God’s creative works visible and life possible. In the OT it is also symbolic of life and blessing (see 2Sa 22:29; Job 3:20; 30:26; 33:30; Ps 49:19; 56:13; 97:11; 112:4; Isa 53:11; 58:8, 10; 59:9; 60:1, 3). Paul uses this word to illustrate God’s recreating work in sin darkened hearts (2Co 4:6).

And Introduction to Matthew:

Introduction to Matthew

Author

  Although the first Gospel is anonymous, the early church fathers were unanimous in holding that Matthew, one of the 12 apostles, was its author. However, the results of modern critical studies—in particular those that stress Matthew’s alleged dependence on Mark for a substantial part of his Gospel—have caused some Biblical scholars to abandon Matthean authorship. Why, they ask, would Matthew, an eyewitness to the events of our Lord’s life, depend so heavily on Mark’s account? The best answer seems to be that he agreed with it and wanted to show that the apostolic testimony to Christ was not divided.

Matthew, whose name means “gift of the Lord,” was a tax collector who left his work to follow Jesus (9:9-13). In Mark and Luke he is called by his other name, Levi.

Date and Place of Writing

Some have argued on the basis of its Jewish characteristics that Matthew’s Gospel was written in the early church period, possibly the early part of a.d. 50, when the church was largely Jewish and the gospel was preached to Jews only (Ac 11:19). However, those who have concluded that both Matthew and Luke drew extensively from Mark’s Gospel date it later—after the Gospel of Mark had been in circulation for a period of time. See essay and chart, The Synoptic Gospels. Accordingly, some feel that Matthew would have been written in the late 50s or in the 60s. Others, who assume that Mark was written between 65 and 70, place Matthew in the 70s or even later. However, there is insufficient evidence to be dogmatic about either view.

The Jewish nature of Matthew’s Gospel may suggest that it was written in the Holy Land, though many think it may have originated in Syrian Antioch.

Recipients

Since his Gospel was written in Greek, Matthew’s readers were obviously Greek-speaking. They also seem to have been Jews. Many elements point to Jewish readership: Matthew’s concern with fulfillment of the OT (he has more quotations from and allusions to the OT than any other NT author); his tracing of Jesus’ descent from Abraham (1:1-17); his lack of explanation of Jewish customs (especially in contrast to Mark); his use of Jewish terminology (e.g., “kingdom of heaven,” where “heaven” reveals the Jewish reverential reluctance to use the name of God; see note on 3:2); his emphasis on Jesus’ role as “Son of David” (1:1; 9:27; 12:23; 15:22; 20:30-31; 21:9, 15; 22:41-45). This does not mean, however, that Matthew restricts his Gospel to Jews. He records the coming of the Magi (non-Jews) to worship the infant Jesus (2:1-12), as well as Jesus’ statement that the “field is the world” (13:38). He also gives a full statement of the Great Commission (28:18-20). These passages show that, although Matthew’s Gospel is Jewish, it has a universal outlook.

Purpose

Matthew’s main purpose is to prove to his Jewish readers that Jesus is their Messiah. He does this primarily by showing how Jesus in his life and ministry fulfilled the OT Scriptures. Although all the Gospel writers quote the OT, Matthew includes nine proof texts unique to his Gospel (1:22-23; 2:15; 2:17-18; 2:23; 4:14-16; 8:17; 12:17-21; 13:35; 27:9-10) to drive home his basic theme: Jesus is the fulfillment of the OT predictions of the Messiah. Matthew even finds the history of God’s people in the OT recapitulated in some aspects of Jesus’ life (see, e.g., his quotation of Hos 11:1 in 2:15). To accomplish his purpose Matthew also emphasizes Jesus’ Davidic lineage (see Recipients above).

Structure

The way the material is arranged reveals an artistic touch. The whole Gospel is woven around five great discourses: (1) chs. 5-7; (2) ch. 10; (3) ch. 13; (4) ch. 18; (5) chs. 24-25. That this is deliberate is clear from the refrain that concludes each discourse: “When Jesus had finished saying these things,” or similar words (7:28; 11:1; 13:53; 19:1; 26:1). The narrative sections, in each case, appropriately lead up to the discourses. The Gospel has a fitting prologue (chs. 1-2) and a challenging epilogue (28:16-20).

The fivefold division may suggest that Matthew has modeled his book on the structure of the Pentateuch (the first five books of the OT). He may also be presenting the gospel as a new Torah and Jesus as a new and greater Moses.

Outline

I. The Birth and Early Years of Jesus (chs. 1-2)

A. His Genealogy (1:1-17)

B. His Birth (1:18-2:12)

C. His Sojourn in Egypt (2:13-23)

II. The Beginnings of Jesus’ Ministry (3:1-4:11)

A. His Forerunner (3:1-12)

B. His Baptism (3:13-17)

C. His Temptation (4:1-11)

III. Jesus’ Ministry in Galilee (4:12-14:12)

A. The Beginning of the Galilean Campaign (4:12-25)

B. The Sermon on the Mount (chs. 5-7)

C. A Collection of Miracles (chs. 8-9)

D. The Commissioning of the 12 Apostles (ch. 10)

E. Ministry throughout Galilee (chs. 11-12)

F. The Parables of the Kingdom (ch. 13)

G. Herod’s Reaction to Jesus’ Ministry (14:1-12)

IV. Jesus’ Withdrawals from Galilee (14:13-17:20)

A. To the Eastern Shore of the Sea of Galilee (14:13-15:20)

B. To Phoenicia (15:21-28)

C. To the Decapolis (15:29-16:12)

D. To Caesarea Philippi (16:13-17:20)

V. Jesus’ Last Ministry in Galilee (17:22-18:35)

A. Prediction of Jesus’ Death (17:22-23)

B. Temple Tax (17:24-27)

C. Discourse on Life in the Kingdom (ch. 18)

VI. Jesus’ Ministry in Judea and Perea (chs. 19-20)

A. Teaching concerning Divorce (19:1-12)

B. Teaching concerning Little Children (19:13-15)

C. The Rich Young Man (19:16-30)

D. The Parable of the Workers in the Vineyard (20:1-16)

E. Prediction of Jesus’ Death (20:17-19)

F. A Mother’s Request (20:20-28)

G. Restoration of Sight at Jericho (20:29-34)

VII. Passion Week (chs. 21-27)

A. The Entry of Jesus into Jerusalem as King (21:1-11)

B. The Cleansing of the Temple (21:12-17)

C. The Last Controversies with the Jewish Leaders (21:18-23:39)

D. The Olivet Discourse (chs. 24-25)

E. The Anointing of Jesus’ Feet (26:1-13)

F. The Arrest, Trials and Death of Jesus (26:14-27:66)

VIII. The Resurrection (ch. 28)

A. The Earthquake and the Angel’s Announcement (28:1-7)

B. Jesus’ Encounter with the Women (28:8-10)

C. The Guards’ Report and the Jewish Elders’ Bribe (28:11-15)

D. The Great Commission (28:16-20)

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NB.Mick | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 24 2017 9:11 AM

Rich DeRuiter:

alabama24:
The edition Rodney has in print is highly unlikely to come to Logos. The one Rich mentioned is a possibility... maybe. 

(...) You're right, the edition that uses the NIV84 as its base text is not at all likely to come into the Logos system

In fact, it already is in Logos - albeit under camouflage as the (slightly Lutheranized) Concordia Self Study Bible https://www.logos.com/product/21069/concordia-self-study-bible 

CSSB on Gen 1:1-3:

1:1 A summary statement introducing the six days of creative activity. The truth of this majestic verse was joyfully affirmed by poet (Ps 102:25) and prophet (Isa 40:21). In the beginning God. The Bible always assumes, and never argues, God’s existence. Although everything else had a beginning, God has always been (Ps 90:2). In the beginning. Jn 1:1–10, which stresses the work of Christ in creation, opens with the same phrase. God created. The Hebrew noun Elohim is plural but the verb is singular, a normal usage in the OT when reference is to the one true God. This use of the plural expresses intensification rather than number and has been called the plural of majesty, or of potentiality. In the OT the Hebrew verb for “create” is used only of divine, never of human, activity. the heavens and the earth. “All things” (Isa 44:24). That God created everything is also taught in Ecc 1:5; Jer 10:16; Jn 1:3; Col 1:16; Heb 1:2. The positive, life-oriented teaching of v. 1 is beautifully summarized in Isa 45:18.
1:2 earth. The focus of this account. formless and empty. The phrase, which appears elsewhere only in Jer 4:23, gives structure to the rest of the chapter (see note on v. 11). God’s “separating” and “gathering” on days 1–3 gave form, and his “making” and “filling” on days 4–6 removed the emptiness. darkness … the waters. Completes the picture of a world awaiting God’s light-giving, order-making and life-creating word. and.† Or “but.” The awesome picture of the original state of the visible creation is relieved by the majestic announcement that the mighty Spirit of God hovers over creation. The announcement anticipates God’s creative words that follow. Spirit of God. He was active in creation, and his creative power continues today (see Job 33:4; Ps 104:30). hovering over.† Like a bird that provides for and protects its young (see Dt 32:11; Isa 31:5).
1:3 God said. Merely by speaking, God brought all things into being (Ps 33:6, 9; 148:5; Heb 11:3). Let there be light. God’s first creative word called forth light in the midst of the primeval darkness. Light is necessary for making God’s creative works visible and life possible. In the OT it is also symbolic of life and blessing (see 2Sa 22:29; Job 3:20; 30:26; 33:30; Ps 49:19; 56:13; 97:11; 112:4; Isa 53:11; 58:8, 10; 59:9; 60:1, 3). Paul uses this word to illustrate God’s re-creating work in sin-darkened hearts (2Co 4:6).

Introduction to Matthew:

See “The Synoptic Gospels,” p. 1443.
God’s Grace in Matthew†
Matthew proclaims Jesus as the climax in the history of God’s grace to his people and to the world. Israel’s history is the story of God’s mercy; it rises from Abraham to David’s reign (1:6), and then descends to the Babylonian captivity (1:11) before reaching the climax in the life, death and resurrection of the promised Messiah. He is the new Moses, the leader of the New Israel, the Christian church (Gal 6:16).
Matthew stresses the truth that God’s grace is complete and universal, superseding the contemporary Pharisaical interpretation of the law (chs. 5–7). He emphasizes this truth by the presence in Jesus’ genealogy of four women (a second-rate social class among the Jews) who were non-Israelites or of blemished character (or both). Only in Matthew’s Gospel do Gentiles honor the holy child at his birth (2:1–12), and he and his parents find protection in a Gentile land (2:13–15). Jesus includes Gentiles in his kingdom (8:10–12; 12:18–21; 21:33–41), extending the Great Commission to all nations (28:18–20).
Luther on the Gospels†
(Apparently Luther’s concern for the “one gospel” prevented him from composing a separate preface to each Gospel, as found in Jerome’s Vulgate.)
“The gospel, then, is nothing but the preaching about Christ, Son of God and of David, true God and man, who by his death and resurrection has overcome for us the sin, death, and hell of all men who believe in him … He writes of it at length, who writes about many words and works of Christ, as do the four evangelists” (LW 35:360)
Author
The early church fathers were unanimous in holding that Matthew, one of the 12 apostles, was the author of this Gospel. However, the results of modern critical studies—in particular those that stress Matthew’s alleged dependence on Mark for a substantial part of his Gospel—have caused some Biblical scholars to abandon Matthean authorship. Why, they ask, would Matthew, an eyewitness to the events of our Lord’s life, depend so heavily on Mark’s account? The best answer seems to be that he agreed with it and wanted to show that the apostolic testimony to Christ was not divided.
Matthew, whose name means “gift of the Lord,” was a tax collector who left his work to follow Jesus (9:9–13). In Mark and Luke he is called by his other name, Levi.
Date and Place of Writing†
The Jewish nature of Matthew’s Gospel may suggest that it was written in Palestine, though many think it may have originated in Syrian Antioch. Some have argued on the basis of its Jewish characteristics that it was written in the early church period, possibly the early part of a.d. 50, when the church was largely Jewish and the gospel was preached to Jews only (Ac 11:19). However, those who have concluded that both Matthew and Luke drew extensively from Mark’s Gospel date it later—after the Gospel of Mark had been in circulation for a period of time. See chart on “Dating the Synoptic Gospels”. Accordingly, some feel that Matthew would have been written in the late 50s or in the 60s. Others, who assume that Mark was written between 65 and 70, place Matthew in the 70s or even later.
The dating of Matthew is a historical question and does not necessarily affect its apostolic authorship.
Recipients
Since his Gospel was written in Greek, Matthew’s readers were obviously Greek-speaking. They also seem to have been Jews. Many elements point to Jewish readership: Matthew’s concern with fulfillment of the OT (he has more quotations from and allusions to the OT than any other NT author); his tracing of Jesus’ descent from Abraham (1:1–17); his lack of explanation of Jewish customs (especially in contrast to Mark); his use of Jewish terminology (e.g., “kingdom of heaven” and “Father in heaven,” where “heaven” reveals the Jewish reverential reluctance to use the name of God); his emphasis on Jesus’ role as “Son of David” (1:1; 9:27; 12:23; 15:22; 20:30–31; 21:9, 15; 22:41–45). This does not mean, however, that Matthew restricts his Gospel to Jews. He records the coming of the Magi (non-Jews) to worship the infant Jesus (2:1–12), as well as Jesus’ statement that the “field is the world” (13:38). He also gives a full statement of the Great Commission (28:18–20). These passages show that, although Matthew’s Gospel is Jewish, it has a universal outlook.
Purpose
Matthew’s main purpose is to prove to his Jewish readers that Jesus is their Messiah. He does this primarily by showing how Jesus in his life and ministry fulfilled the OT Scriptures. Although all the Gospel writers quote the OT, Matthew includes nine additional proof texts (1:22–23; 2:15; 2:17–18; 2:23; 4:14–16; 8:17; 12:17–21; 13:35; 27:9–10) to drive home his basic theme: Jesus is the fulfillment of the OT predictions of the Messiah. Matthew even finds the history of God’s people in the OT recapitulated in some aspects of Jesus’ life (see, e.g., his quotation of Hos 11:1 in 2:15). To accomplish his purpose Matthew also emphasizes Jesus’ Davidic lineage (see Recipients above).
Structure
The way the material is arranged reveals an artistic touch. The whole Gospel is woven around five great discourses: (1) chs. 5–7; (2) ch. 10; (3) ch. 13; (4) ch. 18; (5) chs. 24–25. That this is deliberate is clear from the refrain that concludes each discourse: “When Jesus had finished saying these things,” or similar words (7:28; 11:1; 13:53; 19:1; 26:1). The narrative sections, in each case, appropriately lead up to the discourses. The Gospel has a fitting prologue (chs. 1–2) and a challenging epilogue (28:16–20).
The fivefold division may suggest that Matthew has modeled his book on the structure of the Pentateuch (the first five books of the OT). He may also be presenting the gospel as a new Torah and Jesus as a new and greater Moses.
Outline
I. The Birth and Early Years of Jesus (chs. 1–2)
A. His Genealogy (1:1–17)
B. His Birth (1:18–2:12)
C. His Sojourn in Egypt (2:13–23)
II. The Beginnings of Jesus’ Ministry (3:1–4:11)
A. His Forerunner (3:1–12)
B. His Baptism (3:13–17)
C. His Temptation (4:1–11)
III. Jesus’ Ministry in Galilee (4:12–14:12)
A. The Beginning of the Galilean Campaign (4:12–25)
B. The Sermon on the Mount (chs. 5–7)
C. A Collection of Miracles (chs. 8–9)
D. The Commissioning of the 12 Apostles (ch. 10)
E. Ministry throughout Galilee (chs. 11–12)
F. The Parables of the Kingdom (ch. 13)
G. Herod’s Reaction to Jesus’ Ministry (14:1–12)
IV. Jesus’ Withdrawals from Galilee (14:13–17:20)
A. To the Eastern Shore of the Sea of Galilee (14:13–15:20)
B. To Phoenicia (15:21–28)
C. To the Decapolis (15:29–16:12)
D. To Caesarea Philippi (16:13–17:20)
V. Jesus’ Last Ministry in Galilee (17:22–18:35)
A. Prediction of Jesus’ Death (17:22–23)
B. Temple Tax (17:24–27)
C. Discourse on Life in the Kingdom (ch. 18)
VI. Jesus’ Ministry in Judea and Perea (chs. 19–20)
A. Teaching concerning Divorce (19:1–12)
B. Teaching concerning Little Children (19:13–15)
C. The Rich Young Man (19:16–30)
D. The Parable of the Workers in the Vineyard (20:1–16)
E. Prediction of Jesus’ Death (20:17–19)
F. A Mother’s Request (20:20–28)
G. Restoration of Sight at Jericho (20:29–34)
VII. Passion Week (chs. 21–27)
A. The Triumphal Entry (21:1–11)
B. The Cleansing of the Temple (21:12–17)
C. The Last Controversies with the Jewish Leaders (21:18–23:39)
D. The Olivet Discourse concerning the End of the Age (chs. 24–25)
E. The Anointing of Jesus’ Feet (26:1–13)
F. The Arrest, Trials and Death of Jesus (26:14–27:66)
VIII. The Resurrection (ch. 28)

All items with a dagger symbol have been either newly introduced or (sometimes very minimally) changed by the CSSB editors to better suit their target audience. There is even a Faithlife group where (for a large number of biblical books) those daggered notes are analyzed and the text from NIVSB is given for such changes: https://faithlife.com/concordia-self-study-bible-users/activity 

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Posts 3661
Floyd Johnson | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 24 2017 10:37 AM

NB.Mick:
In fact, it already is in Logos - albeit under camouflage as the (slightly Lutheranized) Concordia Self Study Bible https://www.logos.com/product/21069/concordia-self-study-bible 

Note - the cost of this Study Bible is cheaper when purchased with it's companion commentary,  35.99 vs 39.99, as a bundle.  

Blessings,
Floyd

Pastor-Patrick.blogspot.com

Posts 5248
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 24 2017 11:13 AM

Some of us actually prefer CSSB, but then I was raised Lutheran.  

-dan 

Posts 754
Josh Hunt | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 24 2017 11:32 AM

Rich DeRuiter:

Now that Faithlife has partnered with Zondervan to publish a paper version of the Faithlife Study Bible, how about leveraging that partnership to bring the NIV Study Bible into Logos. (No. I don't mean the Zondervan NIV Study Bible, which is a completely different product.)

We've been asking for this study Bible for years, and I've asked for it many times. I have it the 2011 edition in paper, and it's both excellent and beautiful. If just for Stek on the Psalms, this is one of the best study Bibles out there. I would love to have it in the Logos environment, and don't mind paying twice to get it (paper, plus digital).

So, how about it, Faithlife? Is the time ripe for closing this deal?

Please?

I second the motion

Posts 2236
mab | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 24 2017 8:42 PM

It would be  worthwhile to bring the later edition out.Geeked

The mind of man is the mill of God, not to grind chaff, but wheat. Thomas Manton | Study hard, for the well is deep, and our brains are shallow. Richard Baxter

Posts 233
Charles | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 24 2017 11:41 PM

If anyone is interested, (you can email me) the NIV Study Bible is available to download to your iOS device or Android.  I have it on my iPhone and iPad but would love to also have it in my Logos Library.

In Christ,

Charles

  

 

2017 27" iMac 5K, Mojave, 10.5" iPad Pro, iPhone 7+, iPhone 8, iOS 12.0, Catalina beta, iPadOS Beta  

Posts 5248
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Mar 25 2017 9:10 AM

Charles I don't think it is a violation of forum rules to state the NIV is available for purchase at Olivetree, it is not a product that FL caries so is not promoting a competing version offered by FL, since the one offered by OT is the latest version much revised from the original 1985 edition.. 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~`

The NIV Study Bible is a study Bible originally published by Zondervan in 1985 which uses the New International Version (NIV). Revisions include 1995 [10th anniversary edition], a full revision in 2002, an update in October 2008 for the 30th anniversary of the NIV, and a new update in 2011 (with the text updated to the 2011 edition of the NIV). Its publisher and distributors claim over nine million sold, and claim that it is the world's best selling study bible.

Like the NIV Bible itself, the NIV Study Bible is the work of a transdenominational team of biblical scholars. All confess the authority of the Bible as God's infallible word to humanity. They have sought to clarify understanding of, develop appreciation for, and provide insight into that word. Doctrinally, the NIV Study Bible reflects traditional evangelical Christian theology.

Key features of the NIV Study Bible include archaeological notes, commentary from different sources, and extensive introductions to each book. Notes from translators who worked on the NIV translation add additional clarifying information.

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I shared the above wikipedia snippet since I found myself going on about things realizing that others must have explained things more clearly and better.... The latest version also includes colour pictures and is a very nice update. It would be worth Logos to get... that said I wouldn't be getting it as I own the current version it in OT and the original and 2002 versions in Accordance (who no longer sell either, although one can often find older zondervan CDROMs kicking around for sale).

-dan

Posts 233
Charles | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Mar 25 2017 11:29 AM

Apparently it's not a violation of the rules if I mention where you can download the NIV Study Bible to your iPhone, iPad, or Android device. The NIV Study Bible is available from Tecarta.  Their URL and store is at https://tecartabible.com.  You can also download from the Apple iTunes store or Google store.

And thank you Dan, I didn't know it was also available from Olive Tree.

In Christ,

Charles

2017 27" iMac 5K, Mojave, 10.5" iPad Pro, iPhone 7+, iPhone 8, iOS 12.0, Catalina beta, iPadOS Beta  

Posts 1699
JoshInRI | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 30 2017 5:23 PM

I miss the old NIV that didn't mess with pronouns.

Posts 2236
mab | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 30 2017 9:12 PM

JoshInRI:

I miss the old NIV that didn't mess with pronouns.

Amen!

The mind of man is the mill of God, not to grind chaff, but wheat. Thomas Manton | Study hard, for the well is deep, and our brains are shallow. Richard Baxter

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