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Christian R. Proano M. | Forum Activity | Posted: Tue, Sep 15 2009 6:37 PM

Hey guys,

In your studies, what is the conclusion regarding the Lord's first sign, when He manifested His glory to His disciples, what attribute of His was He showing?

Thank you,

Posts 172
Chris Ease | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 15 2009 7:28 PM

Jesus has just revealed (manifested, showed) His authority and power by performing His first miracle.  The Greek word (doxa) is accusative (direct object) and Jesus is nominative (subject).  The Greek word carries the connotation of greatness, honor, and power (omnipotent). The Messianic age was thought to be a period when God would reveal His glory (Psalm 97:6; 102:16; Isa 60:1-2).  It is in Jesus' humanity that God's glory is revealed.

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 15 2009 8:58 PM

Christian R. Proano M.:
regarding the Lord's first sign

First sign? Okay, I'm lost again. You are asking about one of three events called "epiphany"  (1) the magi (2) baptism of Jesus and (3) miracle at Cana. If you follow the meaning of "epiphany", the relevant attribute is divinity i.e. a theophany of sorts.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 505
Michael Kares | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 15 2009 11:01 PM

Recently heard a sermon in chapel on young earth creationism that used the event to showcase God's ability to instantly create something from (almost) nothing.  Thus perhaps it show cases His role as Creator?

Just throwing this out there

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Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 15 2009 11:19 PM

MJ. Smith:

Christian R. Proano M.:
regarding the Lord's first sign

First sign? Okay, I'm lost again. You are asking about one of three events called "epiphany"  (1) the magi (2) baptism of Jesus and (3) miracle at Cana. If you follow the meaning of "epiphany", the relevant attribute is divinity i.e. a theophany of sorts.

Peace to you!  And Joy!                        

Now, I'm lost!    *smile*    I'm from a liturgical church with heavy emphasis on church year, etc.  Yes ...    divinity   ........     theophany, yes, that's Epiphany.          But, why would a person with a non-liturgical background have to connect this event to Epiphany rather than the beginning of miracles?

Yours in Christ,

       ..........   Mel

 

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 15 2009 11:29 PM

Milford Charles Murray:
why would a person with a non-liturgical background have to connect this event to Epiphany rather than the beginning of miracles?

Good question ... but how did they come to be put together liturgically? I'd say it by looking at the connections between the various events deemed important enough to be included in the story.  I think that we are more impressed by the miracles than Christians were in the early centuries - miracles were not limited to Jesus Christ so I doubt that the miracle aspect was what first came to mind.  However, I am quite willing to say I might be wrong.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 15 2009 11:32 PM

MJ. Smith:

Milford Charles Murray:
why would a person with a non-liturgical background have to connect this event to Epiphany rather than the beginning of miracles?

Good question ... but how did they come to be put together liturgically? I'd say it by looking at the connections between the various events deemed important enough to be included in the story.  I think that we are more impressed by the miracles than Christians were in the early centuries - miracles were not limited to Jesus Christ so I doubt that the miracle aspect was what first came to mind.  However, I am quite willing to say I might be wrong.

You might even be right!  *smile*                I love the unfolding of the Church Year!   

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

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Allen Browne | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 16 2009 8:06 AM

Hi Christian. I hope this reply is not too off-topic, or promote too many diverse views. But you asked a searching question about how this revealed God's glory, so here's something you may like to consider.

When the Word became flesh, God was tabernacled among us (1:14.) The tabernacle (and later the temple) was the place where God’s glory resided, where God could be known. In Jesus, God’s glory was tangible, perceivable.


In the rest of Chapter 1, John then assembles a series of testimonies about Jesus. The spotlight falls on John the Baptist (who was not the light), then Andrew and Peter (initially John’s disciples but moving towards Jesus), and on to Philip and Nathanael. The chapter concludes with Jesus own testimony that he is the “Son of Man” (the human-in-heaven seen in Daniel 7.) We are intended to see the glory of God resting on him, as he links heaven and earth.


John then takes us straight to the wedding feast where Jesus initially says his time has not yet come (2:4) but provides wine for the celebration anyway. Out of all the things God could have done — stopping wars, feeding the starving, preventing plagues, etc — providing some 800 bottles worth of wine for a Galilean wedding seems a rather odd way to “reveal his glory.” There’s got to be more going on here.


Perhaps there’s a hint when he says to his mother, “What does this have to do with me? My time has not yet come.” It was the responsibility of the groom (or his family) to provide for the guests. It would therefore be possible to understand Jesus’ words as, “Why do you ask me to sort this out? It’s not my wedding yet.” In may be informative to examine the other verses where John reports that Jesus time as not yet come (7:30; 8:20) or that his time has come (12:23; 17:1.) I think this makes more sense than to say that Jesus meant, “It’s not time for me to do a miracle for you” but then he does one anyway.


So, if Jesus does have his own wedding in mind in Jn 2:4, it throws a completely different light on how this miracle hints at his glory. No longer is he performing a rather odd stunt for an unknown groom: he is joining in a celebration that hints at where his mission is going, the ultimate glory he will have as he rescues his bride and prepares for her. The picture of salvation as God rescuing his bride is an Exodus picture that’s explicitly spelled out in the prophets (Isaiah, Ezekiel, Hosea, etc.) and understood this way by the early church (e.g. Eph 5:31f; Rev 19:7.)


At this stage, the bride is still hidden within him, and is not revealed until after his death. That’s still consistent with the way John is writing his gospel: his very next account is the cleansing of the temple, and John’s emphasis is that though the Jews thought of the temple as the place where God resides, God was actually resident in Jesus’ body (2:21), and the disciples put this together and “believed” after he was raised from the dead (2:22.)


At the marco level, John is telling a creation story (c.f. 1:1), and Jesus is both the Son of God (the Word incarnate) and also Man as he was originally destined to be, culminating with the resurrection: the Man in the garden at the start of the new creation week (20:1, 19.)

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Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 16 2009 8:43 AM

Allen Browne:

Hi Christian. I hope this reply is not too off-topic, or promote too many diverse views. But you asked a searching question about how this revealed God's glory, so here's something you may like to consider.

When the Word became flesh, God was tabernacled among us (1:14.) The tabernacle (and later the temple) was the place where God’s glory resided, where God could be known. In Jesus, God’s glory was tangible, perceivable.


In the rest of Chapter 1, John then assembles a series of testimonies about Jesus. The spotlight falls on John the Baptist (who was not the light), then Andrew and Peter (initially John’s disciples but moving towards Jesus), and on to Philip and Nathanael. The chapter concludes with Jesus own testimony that he is the “Son of Man” (the human-in-heaven seen in Daniel 7.) We are intended to see the glory of God resting on him, as he links heaven and earth.


John then takes us straight to the wedding feast where Jesus initially says his time has not yet come (2:4) but provides wine for the celebration anyway. Out of all the things God could have done — stopping wars, feeding the starving, preventing plagues, etc — providing some 800 bottles worth of wine for a Galilean wedding seems a rather odd way to “reveal his glory.” There’s got to be more going on here.


Perhaps there’s a hint when he says to his mother, “What does this have to do with me? My time has not yet come.” It was the responsibility of the groom (or his family) to provide for the guests. It would therefore be possible to understand Jesus’ words as, “Why do you ask me to sort this out? It’s not my wedding yet.” In may be informative to examine the other verses where John reports that Jesus time as not yet come (7:30; 8:20) or that his time has come (12:23; 17:1.) I think this makes more sense than to say that Jesus meant, “It’s not time for me to do a miracle for you” but then he does one anyway.


So, if Jesus does have his own wedding in mind in Jn 2:4, it throws a completely different light on how this miracle hints at his glory. No longer is he performing a rather odd stunt for an unknown groom: he is joining in a celebration that hints at where his mission is going, the ultimate glory he will have as he rescues his bride and prepares for her. The picture of salvation as God rescuing his bride is an Exodus picture that’s explicitly spelled out in the prophets (Isaiah, Ezekiel, Hosea, etc.) and understood this way by the early church (e.g. Eph 5:31f; Rev 19:7.)


At this stage, the bride is still hidden within him, and is not revealed until after his death. That’s still consistent with the way John is writing his gospel: his very next account is the cleansing of the temple, and John’s emphasis is that though the Jews thought of the temple as the place where God resides, God was actually resident in Jesus’ body (2:21), and the disciples put this together and “believed” after he was raised from the dead (2:22.)


At the marco level, John is telling a creation story (c.f. 1:1), and Jesus is both the Son of God (the Word incarnate) and also Man as he was originally destined to be, culminating with the resurrection: the Man in the garden at the start of the new creation week (20:1, 19.)

Alan!  *smile*                    The Peace of the Lord be with you!             Joy to you!

                 How beautiful your post.        Will have to study it quite a bit, but just great!       I think I'll be using the notes function!    *smile*

Thank you very much!

Yours in Christ,

 ......    Mel

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

Posts 62
Mike T | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 16 2009 9:01 AM

Hi, Christian

As Allen said, without meaning to stir up a hornet's nest, I would like to reply to a sincere question:

The Marriage Feast of Cana

 

When one reads Mark 8:14-21, it becomes apparent that Christ’s miracles have meaning, and that meaning can only be found allegorically.  Both objects and numbers can have significance.  This is how I interpret John 2:1-11:

 

1 And the third day there was a marriage in Cana of Galilee; and the mother of Jesus was there: 2 And both Jesus was called, and his disciples, to the marriage. 3And when they wanted wine, the mother of Jesus saith unto him, They have no wine.  One of the key elements of this story is wine, which represents redemption.  “They” refers to Galilee, and they have no wine (redemption) because Galilee is a part of the kingdom of Israel which God divorced (Jer 3:8).   Thus they are no longer in covenant with God, e.g. a part of God’s people.

 

4 Jesus saith unto her, Woman, what have I to do with thee?  No, Jesus is not being rude to Mary.  This element serves to separate Christ’s miracle from Mary’s request – think Luke 2:49 “Wist ye not that I must be about my Father’s business?” 

 

4 … mine hour is not yet come.  John defines Christ’s hour in 17:1:  1 These words spake Jesus, and lifted up his eyes to heaven, and said, Father, the hour is come; glorify thy Son, that thy Son also may glorify thee: 2 As thou hast given him power over all flesh, that he should give eternal life to as many as thou hast given him. 

 

5 His mother saith unto the servants, Whatsoever he saith unto you, do it.  Obedience to God’s commandments is tied to God’s favor throughout Scripture (Exd 20:6, Lev 26:3-4, Deu 5:10, Neh 1:9, Pro 4:4, etc.).  John said (15:10):  If ye keep my commandments, ye shall abide in my love; even as I have kept my Father’s commandments, and abide in his love.

 

6 And there were set there six waterpots of stone, after the manner of the purifying of the Jews, containing two or three firkins apiece.  There is much symbolism here…  First, the number six denotes “man” or “man destitute of God”.  Man was created on the sixth day.  (see Bullinger, Number in Scripture).  Second, God is portrayed as the Potter in Scripture, pots (man) as His creation (Isa 64:8, Rom 9:21).  Third, the role of the pots (purification/sanctification) sets up the following element.

 

7 Jesus saith unto them, Fill the waterpots with water. And they filled them up to the brim.  Water is associated with the Holy Spirit throughout Scripture, from creation (Gen 1:2) through baptism (Jhn 3:5).  Thus, this symbolizes the indwelling of the Holy Ghost, which performs the role of sanctification (as above).

 

8 And he saith unto them, Draw out now, and bear unto the governor of the feast. And they bare it. 9 When the ruler of the feast had tasted the water that was made wine, and knew not whence it was: (but the servants which drew the water knew;) the governor of the feast called the bridegroom, 10 And saith unto him, Every man at the beginning doth set forth good wine; and when men have well drunk, then that which is worse: but thou hast kept the good wine until now.   Again, there is much symbolism here.  The ruler of the feast would be the Father, and Christ, as depicted throughout the New Testament, the Bridegroom.  The comparison of the old and new wine represents the superiority of the new redemption through Christ versus the old redemption by the Mosaic covenant.  See also Matt 9:17, Mar 2:22, Luke 5:37-39.  I believe the “now” refers to the marriage feast of Cana, which is symbolic of the marriage feast of the Lamb in Rev 19:9.  Note the similarity of Cana with Canaan (the Promised Land)?

 

11 This beginning of miracles did Jesus in Cana of Galilee, and manifested forth his glory; and his disciples believed on him.  Thus, Christ manifested His glory by laying out His new redemptive plan (those who love God and keep His commandments, filled with the Holy Spirit, will be redeemed by the blood of Christ upon His return) through His first miracle, and His disciples believed on him.

 

I hope that this has been helpful...

Michael

 

Posts 3
Christian R. Proano M. | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 16 2009 9:11 AM

Hi brothers and sisters,

Wow such great answers from you all, one more interesting than the other, thank you so much for such a fast responses, hope more people keep talking about this in this post, I'll check my conclusions and post it too, that way we all participate.

God Bless you all!

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Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 16 2009 9:19 AM

Michael:

Hi, Christian

As Allen said, without meaning to stir up a hornet's nest, I would like to reply to a sincere question:

The Marriage Feast of Cana

 When one reads Mark 8:14-21, it becomes apparent that Christ’s miracles have meaning, and that meaning can only be found allegorically.  Both objects and numbers can have significance.  This is how I interpret John 2:1-11:

..................                  ...................... ............                 ...........

I hope that this has been helpful...

Michael

 

Peace and Joy to you, Dear Brother!                *smile*

      You wrote:   "and that meaning can only be found allegorically"

Here, Michael, is where I begin to disagree with you.  It's good to think things through, but IMHO - to draw such conclusions - it's not being true to Scripture - it's even 'adding' to Scripture (which is verboten).  What you share is quite interesting, but again IMHO you are "stretching things."  I thought Alan was "right on" with his observations which moved me enough that I will be doing a deep study on his comments.   (like the Bereans, I hope ....   *smile* )

Yours in Christ,

      .........   Mel

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

Posts 62
Mike T | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 16 2009 10:45 AM

Milford Charles Murray:

Peace and Joy to you, Dear Brother!                *smile*

       You wrote:   "and that meaning can only be found allegorically"

Here, Michael, is where I begin to disagree with you.  It's good to think things through, but IMHO - to draw such conclusions - it's not being true to Scripture - it's even 'adding' to Scripture (which is verboten).  What you share is quite interesting, but again IMHO you are "stretching things."  I thought Alan was "right on" with his observations which moved me enough that I will be doing a deep study on his comments.   (like the Bereans, I hope ....   *smile* )

Yours in Christ,

      .........   Mel

Hello, Brother Mel!

First, thanks for the warm greetings and the smiles...  I genuinely appreciate an irenic discussion of scripture with others that love the Word as much as I do.  Please take my questions with the same warmth and sincerity...

Before I respond to your post, I would like understand the reason for your disagreement...  Do you object to the content (e.g. you believe I have stated something that is unorthodox) or to the methodology (allegory) or to both?  At times it seemed the one, then the other.  Instead of adding to scripture, my intent was to explain scripture with scripture, much as my old friend Matthew Henry...

I am still relatively new to the study of scripture, so I am by no means above correction.  Nevertheless, to be corrected I must understand the basis for your disagreement.  Could you please explain?

Thank you, Mel

Michael

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Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 16 2009 1:34 PM

Peace! 

Looking forward to replying ...    But, today is booked in until late, late, late ...  will respond tomorrow or soonest!   *smile*

Yours in Christ,

Mel

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 16 2009 5:30 PM

Allen Browne:
John is telling a creation story (c.f. 1:1), and Jesus is both the Son of God (the Word incarnate) and also Man as he was originally destined to be, culminating with the resurrection: the Man in the garden at the start of the new creation week (20:1, 19.)

Allen Browne:
if Jesus does have his own wedding in mind in Jn 2:4, it throws a completely different light on how this miracle hints at his glory

Interesting observations well worth making your comments a note. But I swear that I've never heard "tabernacle" used as a verb before. This make give my linguistically-trained brain overload. Tongue Tied

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 16 2009 5:39 PM

Michael:
that meaning can only be found allegorically.  Both objects and numbers can have significance.

Much of your interpretation could also be labelled "intertextuality" which is currently more "politically correct." Again, I find your response worth saving as a note.  Thank you.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 16 2009 5:55 PM

One of my favorite commentary sites is by Chris Haslam, Anglican Diocese of Montreal at http://montreal.anglican.org/comments/archive/cpr02l.shtml:
Note that this mainstream commentator leans towards the symbolic/allegorical side for the Gospel According to John.

John 2:1-11

John uses symbolism extensively in his telling of the good news. He says in 20:31: “these [signs] are written so that you may come to believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, and that through believing you may have life in his name”. Our reading looks forward to Jesus’ resurrection and glorification (“on the third day”, v. 1), the Last Supper, and the messianic banquet expected at the end of time, when Christ comes again. The “mother of Jesus” appears for the first time in the gospel; the last time is when she stands at the foot of the cross. On both occasions, Jesus addresses her as “Woman” (v. 4), a title roughly equivalent to Madam today: Jesus is guided in his ministry only by the Father’s will (“my hour ...”). Mary’s words in v. 5 suggest that she believes in Jesus, as she does at the foot of the cross. Jesus has the water jars filled completely (“to the brim”, v. 7) with water. In Judaism, the “rites of purification” (v. 6, washing before and after eating) were ceremonial, but in totally transforming water into wine, Jesus replaces the old (Judaism) with the new; wine is a symbol originating in Christ. In Isaiah, marriage between God and his people symbolizes the fulfilment of God’s purpose for his people; here the abundance of good wine symbolizes the joy accompanying the fulfilment (as foretold in several prophetic books). John presents “signs” (v. 11) as aids to people in reaching his objectives (20:31). Jesus shows that God is present in his very nature (“his glory”).

© 1996-2003 Chris Haslam

John 2:1-11

In 1:50, Jesus has told Nathanael: “You will see greater things than these”. This prophecy is beginning to be fulfilled. [BlkJn]

Verse 1: “third day”: This is the third day after the calling of Philip (the apostle) and Nathanael (see 1:43-45), counting that day as the first. John tells us of (or, of most of) the seven days of the new creation story.

Verse 1: “wedding”: A symbol in the prophetic tradition for the time of fulfilment of God’s purpose for his people: see Isaiah 54:4; 62:4-5. For a wedding feast as a parable of the messianic kingdom, see also Matthew 22:2-14 (the Parable of the Wedding Feast); 25:1ff (the Parable of the Ten Bridesmaids) ; Mark 2:19; Revelation 19:9 (“the marriage supper of the Lamb”). [BlkJn]

Verse 1: “Cana”: A small village 15 km northwest of Nazareth. John distinguishes it from Cana in Phoenicia.

Verse 1: “the mother of Jesus”: John mentions her several times (see 2:12; 6:42; 19:25-28) but never by name. BlkJn says that “mother of Jesus” is a more honourable appellation than Mary.

Verse 2: How many of Jesus’ disciples were present? So far in the book, five have been mentioned but there are twelve in 6:67.

Verse 3: Mary’s concern with the shortage of wine suggests that the wedding was that of a near relative.

Verse 4: “what concern ...”: For this Hebrew idiom, see Judges 11:12; 1 Kings 17:18; 2 Kings 3:13; Hosea 14:8. Persistence after rejection is also found in the other miracle at Cana: see 4:47-50. [NJBC]

Verse 4: “Woman”: Jesus also addresses Mary this way in 19:26 but a son did not normally address his mother thus. However, notes BlkJn, the same form of address is used to the Samaritan woman (in 4:21) and to Mary Magdalene (see 20:13, 15), so it must be compatible with affection and respect.

Verse 4: “My hour ...”: Jesus will do nothing without his Father’s will. In 5:19, Jesus says “the Son can do nothing on his own, but only what he sees the Father doing; for whatever the Father does, the Son does likewise”. The miracle is not done for Jesus’ own convenience but to save his host embarrassment. This motive may not have seemed so trivial as it appears to us. Here Mary assumes that Jesus will do something to meet the situation (v. 5). [BlkJn] See also 7:30; 8:20; 12:23, 27; 13:1; 17:1. [NOAB]

Comments: “in totally transforming water into wine, Jesus replaces the old (Judaism) with the new”: BlkJn disagrees with this allegorical interpretation. “six” (v. 6) is not a number that has symbolic significance. But he does consider the event to be a miracle.

Verse 6: “stone”: Stone was used because it was believed that it could not contract ritual uncleanness. That the jars were empty may be symbolic: an indication of the inadequacy of the Jewish rites of purification.

Verse 8: “chief steward”: At Gentile banquets, to be “steward” was a mark of honour for a guest. Perhaps Jewish weddings followed a similar custom. Today we might call this person a headwaiter or toastmaster. However, BlkJn thinks that a Gentile custom is unlikely to have been followed at a Jewish village wedding. To him, the “chief steward” is probably an old family slave, one accorded the freedom of speech possessed by an old retainer.

Verses 9-11: These verses underscore the reality of the event.

Verse 10: Comments: “the abundance of good wine symbolizes the joy accompanying the fulfilment”: For the association of plentiful good wine with the eschaton, see Amos 9:11-14; Hosea 14:4-7; Jeremiah 31:12-14. See also Hosea 2:21-22; Joel 3:18; Isaiah 29:17; 1 Enoch 10:19; 2 Baruch 29:5. [NJBC]

Verse 11: “the first of his signs”: The second can be found in 4:46-54: “Then he came again to Cana in Galilee where he had changed the water into wine. Now there was a royal official whose son lay ill in Capernaum ...” [NOAB]

© 1996-2003 Chris Haslam

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Bill Anderson | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 16 2009 7:03 PM

Here's another interpretation from the historical redemptive perspective: http://www.kerux.com/documents/KeruxV11N1A1.asp

The miracle of the water turned into wine fulfills O.T. anticipatory prophecies about the messianic age, which is described in terms of a feast with wine (Jer. 31:12). John wants us to know that in Jesus, the messianic age has dawned and we get a taste of its goodness (wine). And yet, the present age itself anticipates the ultimate and final fulfillment at the marriage supper of the lamb (Rev. 19:7, 7, 9).

Bill

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 16 2009 9:24 PM

Nice resource - I'll add it to my journal links.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Sep 17 2009 6:35 AM

WilliamAAnderson:

Here's another interpretation from the historical redemptive perspective: http://www.kerux.com/documents/KeruxV11N1A1.asp

The miracle of the water turned into wine fulfills O.T. anticipatory prophecies about the messianic age, which is described in terms of a feast with wine (Jer. 31:12). John wants us to know that in Jesus, the messianic age has dawned and we get a taste of its goodness (wine). And yet, the present age itself anticipates the ultimate and final fulfillment at the marriage supper of the lamb (Rev. 19:7, 7, 9).

Bill

Peace in the Lord to you, Bill!    And Joy!             *smile*

         You have a habit, Bill, of sharing very, very good items!    Thank you.  What an excellent document.  More great things there, "more than I can shake a stick at"!

Am grateful!

Yours in Christ,

 .......   Mel

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

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