Hebrew Word "adena"

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Jack Waskey | Forum Activity | Posted: Mon, May 15 2017 8:03 PM

The Adena Mound Builder Culture is supposed to be named after the Hebrew word "adena." The word adena is suppose to mean “places remarkable for the delightfulness of their situation.” So I cannot find this word in Logos or Noet. What is wrong with my search or is it just missing from Logos?

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Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, May 15 2017 8:14 PM

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adena_Mansion 

I think you'd have to ask the museum?  Closest match I could find was Hasting article on Arabia, connecting Aden to Eden. Eze 27:23.


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Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, May 15 2017 10:23 PM

Jack Waskey:

The Adena Mound Builder Culture is supposed to be named after the Hebrew word "adena." The word adena is suppose to mean “places remarkable for the delightfulness of their situation.” So I cannot find this word in Logos or Noet. What is wrong with my search or is it just missing from Logos?

Welcome Big Smile

One idea is a Bible search with untransliteration (with vowel variation due to variety of Hebrew/Aramaic transliteration schemes)

h:adena

h:aden

so can pick lemma from untransliteration drop down list (of possible words, lemmas, roots):

Logos and Verbum Help have Untransliteration.

Bible Search can be copied/changed to Basic Search for lemma plus add more search terms:

<Lemma = lbs/he/עדן> OR עדן OR adena

Bible verse can be opened so right click on word has lemma for lexicon lookup.

Keep Smiling Smile

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Todd Phillips | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, May 16 2017 6:44 AM

The Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament has some interesting comments:

      1568      עֵדֶן (ʿēden) II, Eden. (Always so translated by the RSV and the ASV).

This word was possibly derived from the Akkadian word edinu based on the Sumerian word eden, meaning “plain, steppe.” Akkadian Bīt Adini refers to the region on both sides of the Euphrates. It was then secondarily associated with the homonymous but unrelated Hebrew root ʿādan meaning enjoyment. However the LXX seems to derive this word directly from the Hebrew root ʿādan by translating it “garden of delight.” This has led to the traditional identification of the Garden of Eden with Paradise which was apt enough (Rev 2:7).

Carl Schultz, “1568 עֵדֶן,” ed. R. Laird Harris, Gleason L. Archer Jr., and Bruce K. Waltke, Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament (Chicago: Moody Press, 1999), 646.

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Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, May 16 2017 7:29 AM

Todd Phillips:

The Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament has some interesting comments:

      1568      עֵדֶן (ʿēden) II, Eden. (Always so translated by the RSV and the ASV).

This word was possibly derived from the Akkadian word edinu based on the Sumerian word eden, meaning “plain, steppe.” Akkadian Bīt Adini refers to the region on both sides of the Euphrates. It was then secondarily associated with the homonymous but unrelated Hebrew root ʿādan meaning enjoyment. However the LXX seems to derive this word directly from the Hebrew root ʿādan by translating it “garden of delight.” This has led to the traditional identification of the Garden of Eden with Paradise which was apt enough (Rev 2:7).

Carl Schultz, “1568 עֵדֶן,” ed. R. Laird Harris, Gleason L. Archer Jr., and Bruce K. Waltke, Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament (Chicago: Moody Press, 1999), 646.

I think you nailed it. Presuming the gentleman named it in the early 1800s, the next mystery is why not Edena. And whense Aden? I'd bet archaeologists newly digging up what they thought was Ninevah, etc.

The dating on the mansion is interesting. This was the wild-west in the early 1800s. And the nearby town was the 1st and 3rd capitals of Ohio. Zanesville from whense our most famous author, was second.


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