Good resources on the Eastern Orthodox view

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Posts 149
Alexander Fogassy | Forum Activity | Posted: Sat, Aug 19 2017 12:13 PM

I am not Eastern Orthodox, but would like to know what Logos sources are great for when I want to study a passage, topic, or doctrine, and be able to look at the Eastern Orthodox perspective. 

Perhaps there is as a dictionary or commentary set out there? Maybe even a lexicon? 

Any suggestions are much appreciated. 

I am tempted to ask the same thing about Roman Catholicism, but I feel like there might be TOO many suggestions (I'm not RCC). 

Posts 939
Deacon Steve | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Aug 19 2017 1:34 PM

Catechisms and liturgical resources usually help in understanding doctrine or a particular topic.  I'm not aware of a single resource that will do it all for you.  You may want to look through the Orthodox libraries and products.  Depending on how much you want to spend, Orthodox Starter may be a good place to begin.

https://www.logos.com/products/search?Christian+Group=Orthodox

https://www.logos.com/product/81185/orthodox-starter

Posts 26303
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Aug 19 2017 3:12 PM

Sorry, but I want to throw some very cold water on your activity before you get yourself in a real mess. Because the Catholic and Orthodox start with a very different world view, understanding of what doctrine and church are, criteria for evaluating doctrine etc. you absolutely have to have an understanding of their framework before you can do comparisons of particular aspects without context. Also, each of the Orthodox Churches has a Catholic counterpart so it is rare for there to be much difference between the Orthodox and Catholic views - one may express it in Eastern terms and the other in Western terms, the East may be more satisfied simply calling it a mystery while the West beats its head against a wall trying to articulate the unarticulatable ...

If you want to get the grounding necessary to do what you want, I suggest the following books in this order: Note these are all available in Logos and not necessarily my first suggestions in dead tree format.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 149
Alexander Fogassy | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Aug 19 2017 7:05 PM

Your caution is duly noted.....

To add a little context to my post: I am very familiar with the respective framework, worldview, ecclesiology, and epistemology, that these two are operating on. 

I'm not asking Logos to impart that knowledge onto me. I am wondering what resources are available, written from an Orthodox perspective, that can at least offer a basic overview of their beliefs on a given doctrine, topic, or Bible passage. 

I understand the West is much more tedious in their approach to theology. Hence why I am reaching out for a somewhat similar resource from the Eastern perspective. 

Putting it another way: thank you very much, but I'm not new to this. 

Posts 1599
Ken McGuire | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Aug 19 2017 7:11 PM

I am also not Eastern Orthodox. I am instead a Lutheran who claims his Catholic roots. By no means am I an expert on the Eastern church.

Quoting from the introduction from a Writing of Historical Theology:

Orthodoxy has a problem with theology. The reasons for this problem are mainly historical. The science of theology developed in the medieval universities, and then passed through the waves of cultural history that swept through the West: Renaissance, Reformation, Enlightenment, Romanticism. But by the time the universities began to develop, in the twelfth century, Christendom had divided, and these developments all took place in a world from which Orthodoxy was estranged. In the twentieth century Orthodoxy encountered the West, and also theology as it had developed in that period of estrangement (earlier encounters, through the discussions connected with the union councils in the Middle Ages, and the establishment of theological academies and later theological faculties in universities in Orthodox countries, only compounded the problem by subjecting Orthodox theology to the “pseudomorphosis” so deplored by Fr Georges Florovsky). Most Orthodox are critical of the development of theology in the West, in particular the way theology had developed as an academic discipline, remote from the life of prayer...

Louth, A. (2001). Foreword. In The Way to Nicaea (Vol. I, p. ix). Crestwood, NY: St Vladimir’s Seminary Press.

I know no way to have a simple manual to look up what "The Orthodox" believe. It is rather a living, organic thing that might die when dissected like that. At the very least, there are so many parts that influence each other that are slightly different from what we Protestants assume... In my opinion, it is best approached by visiting a contemplative community. You will see a bit of how their faith and life intersects that way much better than any book.

The Gospel is not ... a "new law," on the contrary, ... a "new life." - William Julius Mann

Posts 10126
Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Aug 20 2017 6:31 AM

Ken McGuire:

I am also not Eastern Orthodox. I am instead a Lutheran who claims his Catholic roots. By no means am I an expert on the Eastern church.

Quoting from the introduction from a Writing of Historical Theology:

Orthodoxy has a problem with theology. The reasons for this problem are mainly historical. The science of theology developed in the medieval universities, and then passed through the waves of cultural history that swept through the West: Renaissance, Reformation, Enlightenment, Romanticism. But by the time the universities began to develop, in the twelfth century, Christendom had divided, and these developments all took place in a world from which Orthodoxy was estranged. In the twentieth century Orthodoxy encountered the West, and also theology as it had developed in that period of estrangement (earlier encounters, through the discussions connected with the union councils in the Middle Ages, and the establishment of theological academies and later theological faculties in universities in Orthodox countries, only compounded the problem by subjecting Orthodox theology to the “pseudomorphosis” so deplored by Fr Georges Florovsky). Most Orthodox are critical of the development of theology in the West, in particular the way theology had developed as an academic discipline, remote from the life of prayer...

Louth, A. (2001). Foreword. In The Way to Nicaea (Vol. I, p. ix). Crestwood, NY: St Vladimir’s Seminary Press.

I know no way to have a simple manual to look up what "The Orthodox" believe. It is rather a living, organic thing that might die when dissected like that. At the very least, there are so many parts that influence each other that are slightly different from what we Protestants assume... In my opinion, it is best approached by visiting a contemplative community. You will see a bit of how their faith and life intersects that way much better than any book.

What an excellent description. 'Theology' is your life. Which is rarely your theology.


Posts 1599
Ken McGuire | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Aug 20 2017 6:50 AM

There is a reason I remember that opening...

Of course, after the introduction, Father Behr spends 3 books talking about how Orthodoxy developed in the east - and one of his first points is that the incarnation of the Logos was a physical thing that needs to be understood logically - and how the Fathers on the way to Nicaea were faithful in developing this understanding, even if if was not a straight, simple road.

The Gospel is not ... a "new law," on the contrary, ... a "new life." - William Julius Mann

Posts 149
Alexander Fogassy | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Aug 20 2017 8:58 PM

Thank you, this is indeed helpful, and overall consistent from what I do know about Orthodoxy.

Posts 53
Greg Rose | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Aug 21 2017 5:11 AM

Thank you very much for that insight.  I'm a Catholic who has not had much exposure to the Orthodox Church. Your recommendations will be most helpful in providing me with a good starting point!

Posts 2394
David Ames | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Aug 21 2017 5:26 AM

Ken McGuire:

There is a reason I remember that opening...

Of course, after the introduction, Father Behr spends 3 books talking about how Orthodoxy developed in the east - and one of his first points is that the incarnation of the Logos was a physical thing that needs to be understood logically - and how the Fathers on the way to Nicaea were faithful in developing this understanding, even if if was not a straight, simple road.

https://www.logos.com/product/42333/formation-of-christian-theology  

Have posted a note in Orthodox Products referring them to this thread 

https://community.logos.com/forums/p/147758/918248.aspx#918248    

Posts 277
Ergatees | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Aug 23 2017 8:17 AM

Yes

Good suggestion.

Ergatees

Posts 277
Ergatees | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Aug 23 2017 8:19 AM

This lady is a "sweetie". Nice thought.

Posts 3038
Milkman | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Aug 24 2017 8:27 AM

I asked this earlier about EO and you may be interested in this thread.

mm.

mm.

Posts 569
Hamilton Ramos | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Sep 15 2017 11:45 AM

Hi Alexander:

To get an overview maybe the following can be helpful:

https://www.logos.com/product/27749/survivors-guide-to-theology

From the explanations then maybe you can focus more on particular details.

Posts 149
Alexander Fogassy | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 19 2017 8:51 AM

great suggestion, thank you!

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