Reading the septuagint

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Posts 113
Ole Madsen | Forum Activity | Posted: Sat, Mar 3 2018 6:29 AM

I am a beginner i greek NT, I can read greek but I dont understand, but can I use what I know to read the septuagint or is it a different way of speaking the words?

and what ressources do you receommend for reading septuagint?

Ole

Posts 9967
Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Mar 3 2018 7:11 AM

From a practical point of view, only the angels among us (Hebrews) would know pronunciation of both the NT and LXX, but pronunciation guesses would be similar, since the two overlap across several centuries, and both a koine.

Depending on your pocketblook, the Lexham series from Logos are very helpful:

https://www.logos.com/products/search?q=lexham+septuagint 

And if you run into specific questions, Rick, the primary author, comes on the forum often.


Posts 113
Ole Madsen | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Mar 3 2018 9:02 AM

thanks for your help, God bless

Posts 113
Ole Madsen | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Mar 3 2018 7:01 PM

could you also please recommend a NT Interlinear?

Posts 113
Ole Madsen | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Mar 3 2018 7:09 PM

I know there a different kinds of interlinears, reverse and so on, but would it not be the best to have the greek as it is in the original?

Posts 136
James Macleod | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Mar 3 2018 7:29 PM

Ole Madsen:

could you also please recommend a NT Interlinear?

I'm not sure what you mean "I can read greek but I dont understand." If you don't understand, then are you really reading? The Septuagint is written in Greek so if you know Koine Greek well you can read it. The vocabulary and the grammar in it are more extensive than the NT.

Logos has reverse interlinears built into most of their Bible versions if you spend enough to get a package with the functionality. However, if you want to learn to read Greek, I would avoid interlinears. They become a crutch. 

I learned Greek with Basics of Biblical Greek. The text and workbook are available in Logos. It is a good option, but there are many good options out there now for learning Greek.

Posts 9967
Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Mar 3 2018 7:51 PM

Ole Madsen:

could you also please recommend a NT Interlinear?

Ole, for what you want, you would avoid those that have ‘reverse’ in the title. In the septuagint list above, there was one. ‘Reverse’ means it’s the english order. You want the greek order (the rest).

The other choice is interlinear or not. If you were studying serious  greek, you’d avoid interlinear as above. But if you just want  a working readability, an interlinear is helpful. You can set it to only display the greek, or add the lemmas, or grammar. Your choice.

Below are the NT greeks:

https://www.logos.com/products/search?q=&Bible+and+Apocrypha=New+Testament&Resource+Type=Bibles&Language=Greek&start=&sort=bestselling&pageSize=60 

For getting your feet wet, the free one near the bottom, is fine. The current ‘official’ version is NA28. Or you could select an interlinear, as discussed above.

You may wish to describe a little more, of what you need?


Posts 113
Ole Madsen | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Mar 3 2018 9:16 PM

I bought Lexham Greek-English Interlinear New Testament Collection (3 vols.)

thanks for your help

Where I am right now is, I want to learn "greek for the rest of us", and then move on to basics of biblical greek maybe, but I take one book at the time and see where it moves me to

are you fluently in greek or is it just church greek you can? please incourage me to move on if you think thats what I need to, I dont know whats up ahead

Posts 510
Gordon Jones | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Mar 4 2018 1:58 AM

Ole Madsen:

I am a beginner i greek NT, I can read greek but I dont understand, but can I use what I know to read the septuagint or is it a different way of speaking the words?

Hei Ole,

The Septuagint was written in the same Greek dialect as the New Testament: Koine.

Logos has training courses for Koine e.g. www.logos.com/product/130790/mobile-ed-la161-learn-to-use-biblical-greek-with-logos-6 It is currently cheaper to buy that course as part of the Greek and Hebrew collection www.logos.com/product/49819/mobile-ed-learn-to-use-biblical-greek-and-hebrew-with-logos-6 Doing a course costs much more than buying a book but in my experience it is a much better method to learn a language. The audio in the course would help you learn pronunciation.

Posts 113
Ole Madsen | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Mar 4 2018 3:23 AM

Hi Gordon, thanks

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Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Mar 4 2018 11:46 AM

March Madness has Mobile Ed Greek Certificate program => https://www.logos.com/product/145022/biblical-greek-foundational-certificate-program for voting: Schwandt

Another Logos resource to consider => Learning New Testament Greek Now and Then includes sentence diagramming

Thankful for => Greek New Testament Discourse Bundle

Thankful Logos Greek Morphology visual filters are usable in Greek and English so can "see" range of Greek verbal expression:

Corresponding Words Visual Filter is useful for seeing word/lemma repetition within a Bible plus see in other Bibles.

FYI: Psalm 50 in LXX (Septuagint) is Psalm 51 in many English Bibles.

Logos wiki has => 

Forum thread more inductive symbols includes “ductive – Precept ” Highlighting Palette and Visual Filters plus illustrates Joining or Following Faithlife group Logos Visual Filters for document copying.

Keep Smiling Smile

Posts 113
Ole Madsen | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Mar 4 2018 6:16 PM

that is a bit advanced to me, but thanks

Posts 17833
Forum MVP
Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Mar 4 2018 10:53 PM

Ole Madsen:

that is a bit advanced to me, but thanks

Greek verbal system has more nuances/expressions than English. Advanced approach allows English and Greek parallel viewing with corresponding highlights. Parallel view shows context of words in each language. Greek spelling includes grammatical usage, which allows words to be placed for emphasis.

Interlinear deception potential is showing Greek with English translation so reading Greek is actually reading English translation while following Greek words.

Keep Smiling Smile

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