Word Study - Calling Greek scholars

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Posts 79
George Ruddell | Forum Activity | Posted: Mon, Apr 26 2010 12:35 PM

Hello

 

I am working on a word study of φρονέω from Colossians 3:2. I have a lot of good Logos 4 resources – BDAG, Louw-Nida, etc. I have three questions? Firstly, how can I be sure of identifying all of φρονέω’s cognates? Secondly, how exactly do I use Louw-Nida to identify the word “families” that φρονέω is part of? Thirdly, which are the best Lexicon’s to look at?

 

Thank you in anticipation.

 

George Ruddell

in Northern Ireland

 

Posts 418
davidphillips | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 26 2010 1:36 PM

I'm not a Greek scholar, but hopefully some of this will be helpful.

George Ruddell:
Firstly, how can I be sure of identifying all of φρονέω’s cognates?

The best place for identifying cognates (that I can think of) is TDNT, the Theological Dictionary of the New Testament.

George Ruddell:
Secondly, how exactly do I use Louw-Nida to identify the word “families” that φρονέω is part of?

I'm not exactly sure what you mean by word "families," but you're probably asking about semantic domains, which is the focus of LN. In order to see what other words are in the same domain as the word you're looking at:

1) Determine how the word is being used (either with LN or another Lexicon like BDAG, see question 3 below).

2) Open LN to the given word and then click number next to the meaning you've determined based on your study. Let's say you choose option b in LN, "ponder".

3) Open the table of contents by clicking on the double arrow button, then scan the other words listed in that LN sub-domain. (The picture shows the table of contents already opened. The double arrow circled will be pointing to the right when the contents are closed).

George Ruddell:
Thirdly, which are the best Lexicon’s to look at?

BDAG is the standard lexicon and should be your first stop.

Posts 79
George Ruddell | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 26 2010 1:52 PM

David

Thank you for taking time to reply. Your advices are very helpful. I am working on my Word Study right now. I will let you know how I get on. The help which you have given in relation to cognates and using the semantic domains is especially useful.

God bless.

George

 

Posts 79
George Ruddell | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 26 2010 2:08 PM

David

Can I ask you one more question? What do I call a list of all of the passages in the New Testament where my chosen word appears? Is this the word's morphology? (I have made a complete list).

Thank you.

George

 

 

Posts 2759
DominicM | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 26 2010 2:14 PM

right click on word, and when you click manuscript you will get option of search this resource..

Never Deprive Anyone of Hope.. It Might Be ALL They Have

Posts 418
davidphillips | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 26 2010 3:34 PM

George Ruddell:
What do I call a list of all of the passages in the New Testament where my chosen word appears?

I don't know what the technical term would be (if there is one). I'd just call it a complete list of the occurrences of the word. Or an "exhaustive" list if you want to sound fancy Wink.

A word's morphology refers to it's form in a given instance (it's part of speech, case, number, gender, etc.), for example: noun, nominative (case), singular (number), masculine (gender). If you hover over a word in a morphologically tagged bible (including many english bibles thanks to Logos' work on the reverse interlinears), it will show you the morphology:

Posts 79
George Ruddell | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 26 2010 4:05 PM

David

Thank you so much for your help. I have my Word Study finished. It is great to have it out of the way. Now to my next assignment. Although I live in Northern Ireland, I am a student with Wesley Biblical Seminary in Jackson, MS (online).

God bless.

George

 

Posts 1130
Keith Larson | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 26 2010 5:06 PM

George,

Although you now have your assignment done, I would like to point out a book that I have found very helpful with cognates: "Mastering New Testament Greek Vocabulary" by Thomas Robinson.  It is now in the third edition and is now entitled, "Mastering New Testament Greek."

Here is the Amazon description of this new edition. Sound even more helpful than the edition I have:

Students of New Testament Greek face at least two major hurdles: building a working vocabulary necessary for effective exegesis, and learning to identify (parse) the plethora of grammatically fluctuating forms that appear in the biblical text. In Mastering New Testament Greek, the revised and expanded third edition of Mastering Greek Vocabulary, Thomas Robinson offers learners an inventive set of tools for meeting these challenges.

At the heart of Robinson's ingenious vocabulary mastery system is the cognate group, in which Greek words are linked together according to the roots they share in common. By associating common Greek roots with the words that contain them, students are able to build a working vocabulary far more quickly than by merely learning a list of individual words. Mastering New Testament Greek provides additional vocabulary help by offering comprehensive lists of cognates, derivatives, suffixes, and prefixes that correlate Greek words with their English counterparts.

Added features assist students to master common pronouns, adverbs, adjectives, and prepositions:
* The Index of Greek Word Endings, an innovative feature of this expanded edition, enables Greek students to look up Greek words in reverse alphabetical order to analyze baffling grammatical forms.

* Mastering New Testament Greek also comes with a CD packed with user-friendly software programs that support and expand the utilities contained in the book.

* Software modules assist students in learning the Greek alphabet and vocabulary, pronouncing words, reviewing verb paradigms, and parsing difficult grammatical forms.

* The software is also linked to a complete online Greek grammar.

Taken together, the tools contained in Mastering New Testament Greek and in the accompanying CD form an essential learning kit that students of the language of the New Testament, from beginning to advanced, will not want to be without.

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