Oxford Latin Dictionary, Second Edition

Page 1 of 1 (14 items)
This post has 13 Replies | 2 Followers

Posts 999
Mike Pettit | Forum Activity | Posted: Wed, May 30 2018 2:33 PM

It looks like the Oxford Latin Dictionary finally has a shipping date of 21/06.

Its only taken 12 years! 

   

Posts 9967
Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, May 30 2018 3:01 PM

Yawn ... oh gracious, 12 years??  Or was that the Oxford English?  The holy grail.

Thank you, Mike. I'm 50-50, with my L&S but I hit the prepub button. I guess a month to waver.


Posts 967
Tom Reynolds | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Feb 11 2019 1:21 PM

I'm wondering if someone who bought this could let us know if it is indeed the 2012 text (as stated on the product page) or if they included the corrections from subsequent printings. Could you have a look at the (c) info. I have heard of at least 2015 and 2016 corrected printings.

Thanks,

Tom

Posts 6158
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Feb 11 2019 1:49 PM

$359.99? LOL 😂 Good for those who’ll spend that kind of money just to have it sit in their libraries for most of their lives until they decide to go to the Logos Facebook Resale page and try to at least get some of their money back 😜 They’ll probably look up a few entries and then say, “Oh boy, I’m glad I finally got this one in my library!,” and then they’ll try to justify their expens by saying, “It’s good to have it so it’ll come up in my searches and if something comes up, it’ll be there.” (Assuming it was properly tagged to even show up on searches).

But Anyway, it’s a good dictionary if one actually spoke latin or use it in sermon prep 👍😁👌

DAL

Posts 436
J. Remington Bowling | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Feb 11 2019 1:56 PM

If anyone is interested in a cheaper Latin dictionary that could be useful for beginner Latin students Collins is good: 

https://www.logos.com/product/3504/collins-latin-dictionary-and-grammar

It's similar to the Bantam New College Latin and English Dictionary by Traupman.

(Some teach Latin and/or Classics, Dale... But even then it's a hard price to justify.)

Posts 9967
Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Feb 11 2019 1:57 PM

Tom Reynolds:

I'm wondering if someone who bought this could let us know if it is indeed the 2012 text (as stated on the product page) or if they included the corrections from subsequent printings. Could you have a look at the (c) info. I have heard of at least 2015 and 2016 corrected printings.

Thanks,

Tom

Twarnt me ... I passed. I don't Facebook, so I couldn't resell it at a deep discount. L&S is fine.

I still would like a better Oxford English. The Collins, meh. I have Shorter Oxford which would be nice inside Logos.


Posts 999
Mike Pettit | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Feb 11 2019 2:21 PM

Tom Reynolds:

I'm wondering if someone who bought this could let us know if it is indeed the 2012 text (as stated on the product page) or if they included the corrections from subsequent printings. Could you have a look at the (c) info. I have heard of at least 2015 and 2016 corrected printings.

Thanks,

Tom

It reads:

Great Clarendon Street, Oxford, ox2 6dp, United Kingdom Oxford University Press is a department of the University of Oxford. It furthers the University’s objective of excellence in research, scholarship, and education by publishing worldwide. Oxford is a registered trade mark of Oxford University Press in the UK and in certain other countries © Oxford University Press 2012 First Edition published in 1982
Second Edition published in 2012
Impression: 1

The preface includes:

The Oxford Latin Dictionary is the largest and most up to date Latin-English dictionary available today. Covering classical Latin from its beginnings to the end of the second century AD, it is the standard work for students, translators, and scholars of Latin. The dictionary contains 40,000 entries, 100,000 translations, and more than five million words of text, with some 415,000 citations from Latin sources.
The first edition wals published as a single volume in 1982, but work on it had started in 1933 and continued for nearly fifty years. The text began appearing in fascicles or parts in 1968.
For this second edition, the whole text has been captured electronically and the constituent parts of each entry tagged according to their function. This has resulted in a fully searchable database, enabling a considerable amount of standardization and harmonization of the original text, and the rechecking of cross-references and bibliographical data. The Addenda and Corrigenda from the first edition have now been incorporated into the main text.

spot the typo (wals) :)

Posts 176
Puddin’ | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Feb 11 2019 11:49 PM

Someone correct me if I am wrong here, but I thought the only advantage to studying Latin was to understand the Vulgate - which was fraught with translational problems - better (?).  Reason I ask is because I am currently approx. 1/4 way through Hebrew I & am looking to pick up another Biblical language afterwards (currently [slowly] in Greek II).  

Was considering Aramaic next, but, since there‘s only ca. 269 vss. in the Bible that are Aramaic I am not so sure the end would justify the means (also considering Ugaritic & Classical Syriac as per Zondervan).

Posts 2199
Jan Krohn | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Feb 12 2019 1:52 AM

Puddin’:

Someone correct me if I am wrong here, but I thought the only advantage to studying Latin was to understand the Vulgate - which was fraught with translational problems - better (?).  Reason I ask is because I am currently approx. 1/4 way through Hebrew I & am looking to pick up another Biblical language afterwards (currently [slowly] in Greek II).  

It might be interesting for digging into church history. From Tertullian to Luther, people used to write in Latin. I'm not even sure whether all documents from church history have been translated from Latin to English yet.

One more advantage would be to be able to read the Vatican's website. http://www.vatican.va/latin/latin_index.html

One thing is certain though. For working with ecclesiastical texts, a dictionary of classical Latin, that ends around A.D. 200, would be like using a screwdriver on a nail.

Even the Vulgate is not classical Latin.

Past IT Consultant. Past Mission Worker. Entrepreneur. Future Seminary Student.
Why Amazon sucks: Full background story of my legal dispute with the online giant

Posts 176
Puddin’ | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Feb 12 2019 2:17 AM

Good points about ecclesiological studies Jan.  Had not considered that.  My assumption was that early church authors wrote in Koine...had not considered Latin 👍.

Posts 135
Manuel Maria | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Feb 12 2019 3:53 AM

One of these days the price will go down to $150 and many of us will run after the deal. But if the start price were be $150, there would be as many purchases, I suppose. The same would happen if the dictionary shows up suddenly inside a nice bundle. Don't you think so?

Posts 1231
HJ. van der Wal | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Feb 12 2019 4:16 AM
Shalom Puddin'! In addition to what Jan wrote I would like to point out that long after the reformation many (protestant) theologians were still writing in Latin. Take for example the recent pre-pub of Petrus van Mastricht's Theoretical-Practical Theology; this important work of reformed systematic theology is only now being translated in a modern language. But if your main interest is in biblical studies I would encourage you to learn Biblical Aramaic (which is nearly identical to Imperial Aramaic). In addition to the Aramaic portions of the Bible you will also be able to read texts like the Aramaic Elephantine papyri and the targumim. There is a wealth of Jewish and Christian literature in several Aramaic dialects (including Syriac).
Posts 176
Puddin’ | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Feb 12 2019 4:27 AM

HJ. van der Wal:
Shalom Puddin'! In addition to what Jan wrote I would like to point out that long after the reformation many (protestant) theologians were still writing in Latin. Take for example the recent pre-pub of Petrus van Mastricht's Theoretical-Practical Theology; this important work of reformed systematic theology is only now being translated in a modern language. But if your main interest is in biblical studies I would encourage you to learn Biblical Aramaic (which is nearly identical to Imperial Aramaic). In addition to the Aramaic portions of the Bible you will also be able to read texts like the Aramaic Elephantine papyri and the targumim. There is a wealth of Jewish and Christian literature in several Aramaic dialects (including Syriac).

Shalom!  I am definitely leaning toward Aramaic...and your point about the Targumim solidifies that leaning.  I had completely forgotten about this and I often hear dubious theological appeals to the same.  Would love to read them myself...but probably need to pass Hebrew I first 🤓.  Will review your post more carefully a little later 👍.

Posts 967
Tom Reynolds | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Feb 12 2019 10:15 AM

Mike Pettit:

Second Edition published in 2012
Impression: 1

Thanks Mike, it sounds like they haven't incorporated the corrections from the subsequent printings. You'd think for this price they could make those fixes.

Page 1 of 1 (14 items) | RSS