A Question about Vine's Complete Expository Dictionary

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Beloved Amodeo | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Aug 1 2018 1:40 PM

Richard J. Ward:
 

Hi Richard,

It is I think meant for the novice. The Bible student who is interested in gaining insight into some of the keywords in the Bible. I used it early in my study of the Bible but now rely on more academic lexicons and language books. Hope this helps. 

Meanwhile, Jesus kept on growing wiser and more mature, and in favor with God and his fellow man.

International Standard Version. (2011). (Lk 2:52). Yorba Linda, CA: ISV Foundation.

MacBook Pro macOS Big Sur 11.6 1TB SSD 

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Aaron Baldridge | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Aug 1 2018 2:47 PM

I would tend to agree. It is reliable as far as accuracy. It is designed for the layperson or beginning pastor. I still use it occasionally but most often utilize more detailed lexicons. 

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DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Aug 1 2018 4:07 PM

A must have for its simplicity! Being Expository in nature is what separates it from the rest. 馃憤馃榿馃憣

Posts 196
Richard J. Ward | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Aug 1 2018 5:53 PM

Basically, I am wondering how reliable his research is. 

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Beloved Amodeo | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Aug 1 2018 6:09 PM

I could repeat what has already been said or allow you a sample to judge for yourself.


BELIEF, BELIEVE, BELIEVERS

A. Verbs.
1. pisteuo (πιστε蠉ω, 4100), “to believe,” also “to be persuaded of,” and hence, “to place confidence in, to trust,” signifies, in this sense of the word, reliance upon, not mere credence. It is most frequent in the writings of the apostle John, especially the Gospel. He does not use the noun (see below). For the Lord’s first use of the verb, see 1:50. Of the writers of the Gospels, Matthew uses the verb ten times, Mark ten, Luke nine, John ninety-nine. In Acts 5:14 the present participle of the verb is translated “believers. See COMMIT, INTRUST, TRUST.
2. peitho (πε委θω, 3982), “to persuade,” in the middle and passive voices signifies “to suffer oneself to be persuaded,” e.g., Luke 16:31; Heb. 13:18; it is sometimes translated “believe” in the RV, but not in Acts 17:4, RV, “were persuaded,” and 27:11, “gave (more) heed”; in Acts 28:24, “believed. See AGREE, ASSURE, OBEY, PERSUADE, TRUST, YIELD.
Note: For apisteo, the negative of No. 1, and apeitheo, the negative of No. 2, see DISBELIEVE, DISOBEDIENT.

B. Noun.
pistis (π委στις, 4102), “faith,” is translated “belief” in Rom. 10:17; 2 Thess. 2:13. Its chief significance is a conviction respecting God and His Word and the believer’s relationship to Him. See ASSURANCE, FAITH, FIDELITY.
Note: In 1 Cor. 9:5 the word translated “believer” (RV), is adelphe, “a sister,” so 7:15; Rom. 16:1; Jas. 2:15, used, in the spiritual sense, of one connected by the tie of the Christian faith.

C. Adjective.
pistos (πιστ蠈ς, 4103), (a) in the active sense means “believing, trusting”; (b) in the passive sense, “trusty, faithful, trustworthy.” It is translated “believer” in 2 Cor. 6:15; “them that believe” in 1 Tim. 4:12, RV (KJV, “believers”); in 1 Tim. 5:16, “if any woman that believeth,” lit. “if any believing woman.” So in 6:2, “believing masters.” In 1 Pet. 1:21 the RV, following the most authentic mss., gives the noun form, “are believers in God” (KJV, “do believe in God”). In John 20:27 it is translated “believing.” It is best understood with significance (a), above, e.g., in Gal. 3:9; Acts 16:1; 2 Cor. 6:15; Titus 1:6; it has significance (b), e.g., in 1 Thess. 5:24; 2 Thess. 3:3 (see Notes on Thess. p. 211, and Gal. p. 126, by Hogg and Vine). See FAITHFUL, SURE.
Notes: (1) The corresponding negative verb is apisteo, 2 Tim. 2:13, KJV, “believe not” RV, “are faithless,” in contrast to the statement “He abideth faithful.”
(2) The negative noun apistia, “unbelief,” is used twice in Matthew (13:58); 17:20), three times in Mark (6:6; 9:24; 16:14), four times in Romans (3:3; 4:20; 11:20, 23); elsewhere in 1 Tim. 1:13 and Heb. 3:12, 19.¶
(3) The adjective apistos is translated “unbelievers” in 1 Cor. 6:6, and 2 Cor. 6:14; in v. 15, RV, “unbeliever” (KJV, “infidel”); so in 1 Tim. 5:8; “unbelieving” in 1 Cor. 7:12–15; 14:22–24; 2 Cor. 4:4; Titus 1:15; Rev. 21:8; “that believe not” in 1 Cor. 10:27. In the Gospels it is translated “faithless” in Matt. 17:17; Mark 9:19; Luke 9:41; John 20:27, but in Luke 12:46, RV, “unfaithful,” KJV, “unbelievers.” Once it is translated “incredible,” Acts 26:8. See FAITHLESS, INCREDIBLE, UNBELIEVER.¶
(4) Plerophoreo, in Luke 1:1 (KJV, “are most surely believed,” lit., “have had full course”), the RV renders “have been fulfilled.” See FULFILL, KNOW, PERSUADE, PROOF.


Vine, W. E., Unger, M. F., & White, W., Jr. (1996). Vine’s Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words (Vol. 2, p. 61). Nashville, TN: T. Nelson.

Meanwhile, Jesus kept on growing wiser and more mature, and in favor with God and his fellow man.

International Standard Version. (2011). (Lk 2:52). Yorba Linda, CA: ISV Foundation.

MacBook Pro macOS Big Sur 11.6 1TB SSD 

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Beloved Amodeo | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Aug 1 2018 6:14 PM

A sample from the OT.


LAW

A. Noun.
torah (转旨讜止专指讛, 8451), “law; direction; instruction.” This noun occurs 220 times in the Hebrew Old Testament.

In the wisdom literature, where the noun does not appear with a definite article, torah signifies primarily “direction, teaching, instruction”: “The law of the wise is a fountain of life, to depart from the snares of death” (Prov. 13:14), and “Receive, I pray thee, the law from his mouth, and lay up his words in thine heart” (Job 22:22). The “instruction” of the sages of Israel, who were charged with the education of the young, was intended to cultivate in the young a fear of the Lord so that they might live in accordance with God’s expectations. The sage was a father to his pupils: “Whoso keepeth the law is a wise son: but he that is a companion of riotous men shameth his father” (Prov. 28:7; cf. 3:1; 4:2; 7:2). The natural father might also instruct his son in wise living, even as a Godfearing woman was an example of kind “instruction”: “She openeth her mouth with wisdom; and in her tongue is the law of kindness” (Prov. 31:26).
The “instruction” given by God to Moses and the Israelites became known as “the law” or “the direction” (ha-torah), and quite frequently as “the Law of the Lord”: “Blessed are the undefiled in the way, who walk in the law of the Lord” (Ps. 119:1), or “the Law of God”: “Also day by day, from the first day unto the last day, [Ezra] read in the book of the law of God” (Neh. 8:18), and also as “the Law of [given through] Moses”: “Remember ye the law of Moses my servant, which I commanded unto him in Horeb for all Israel …” (Mal. 4:4). The word can refer to the whole of the “law”: “For he established a testimony in Jacob, and appointed a law in Israel, which he commanded our fathers, that they should make them known to their children” (Ps. 78:5), or to particulars: “And this is the law which Moses set before the children of Israel …” (Deut. 4:44).
God had communicated the “law” that Israel might observe and live: “And what nation is there so great, that hath statutes and judgments so righteous as all this law, which I set before you this day?” (Deut. 4:8). The king was instructed to have a copy of the “law” prepared for him at his coronation (Deut. 17:18). The priests were charged with the study and teaching of, as well as the jurisprudence based upon, the “law” (Jer. 18:18). Because of rampant apostasy the last days of Judah were times when there were no teaching priests (2 Chron. 15:3); in fact, in Josiah’s days the “law” (whether the whole Torah, or a book or a part) was recovered: “And Hilkiah … said to Shaphan the scribe, I have found the book of the law in the house of the Lord” (2 Chron. 34:15).
The prophets called Israel to repent by returning to the tôr膩h (“instruction”) of God (Isa. 1:10). Jeremiah prophesied concerning God’s new dealing with His people in terms of the New Covenant, in which God’s law is to be internalized, God’s people would willingly obey Him: “But this shall be the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel; After those days, saith the Lord, I will put my law in their inward parts, and write it in their hearts; and will be their God, and they shall be my people” (Jer. 31:33). The last prophet of the Old Testament reminded the priests of their obligations (Mal. 2) and challenged God’s people to remember the “law” of Moses in preparation for the coming Messiah (Mal. 4:4).
The Septuagint gives the following translations: nomos (“law; rule”); nomimos (“conformable to law; lawful”); entole (“command[ment]; order”); and prostagma (“order; commandment; injunction”).

B. Verb.
yarah (讬指专指讛, 3384), “to throw, cast, direct, teach, instruct.” The noun torah is derived from this root. The meaning “to cast” appears in Gen. 31:51: “And Laban said to Jacob, Behold this heap, and behold this pillar, which I have cast betwixt me and thee.” Yarah means “to teach” in 1 Sam. 12:23: “… but I will teach you the good and the right way.”


Vine, W. E., Unger, M. F., & White, W., Jr. (1996). Vine’s Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words (Vol. 1, pp. 133–134). Nashville, TN: T. Nelson.

Meanwhile, Jesus kept on growing wiser and more mature, and in favor with God and his fellow man.

International Standard Version. (2011). (Lk 2:52). Yorba Linda, CA: ISV Foundation.

MacBook Pro macOS Big Sur 11.6 1TB SSD 

Posts 196
Richard J. Ward | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Aug 1 2018 6:17 PM

Thank you Yes

Posts 3167
Beloved Amodeo | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Aug 1 2018 6:33 PM

Any time Richard Smile

Meanwhile, Jesus kept on growing wiser and more mature, and in favor with God and his fellow man.

International Standard Version. (2011). (Lk 2:52). Yorba Linda, CA: ISV Foundation.

MacBook Pro macOS Big Sur 11.6 1TB SSD 

Posts 3167
Beloved Amodeo | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Aug 1 2018 6:33 PM

Any time Richard Smile

Meanwhile, Jesus kept on growing wiser and more mature, and in favor with God and his fellow man.

International Standard Version. (2011). (Lk 2:52). Yorba Linda, CA: ISV Foundation.

MacBook Pro macOS Big Sur 11.6 1TB SSD 

Posts 11433
DMB | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Aug 1 2018 7:51 PM

DAL:

A must have for its simplicity! Being Expository in nature is what separates it from the rest. 馃憤馃榿馃憣

I agree. And I wouldn't characterize lay vs expert. More, relative to indexed by english instead of Hebrew or Greek. If you're working in a text, and right-click an English word, Vines (also Strongs word studies) drills into its semantic usage quickly. Vines also has a topic index that's handy. Names of God and one I'd missed.

I just finished Silva's book on Biblical words and lexical semantics. He potshots the well known lexicons, for simply continuing traditionally assigned meanings, while implying 'the' meaning. A good discussion, since Vines is more circumspect.

"God will save his fallen angels and their broken wings He'll mend."

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