Greek Imperatives with Visual Filters

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David Scott | Forum Activity | Posted: Tue, Aug 14 2018 5:45 PM

Let me start by saying that I don't know Greek.

I have a Visual Filter called "NT Imperatives" that highlights all imperative verbs (@V??M). Logos is highlighting "Stop" in 1 Cor. 7:5 (NASB), but a right-click suggests that it is a negative adverb (@BN) and a particle adverb (@TN) , but not an imperative. Logos provides the same morph tagging on the next word in that verse - "depriving". I found the following in a Logos resource titled Kairos: A Beginning Greek Grammar:
    2.       Prohibition with μη.: The Aorist Subjunctive with the negative particle μή is used for a negative command, which is called prohibition. See Wallace 469. The translation would be something like Don’t do this or that … !

             Heb 3:8a      μὴ σκληρύνητε τὰς καρδίας ὑμῶν.…
             Don’t harden your hearts … !


Long, F. J. (2005). Kairos: a beginning Greek grammar (p. 206). Mishawaka, IN: Fredrick J. Long. So, is it an imperative? (It sounds like one.)  If so, why does Logos tag it with "@BN", which doesn't look like @V??M?  And, how does my Visual Filter know to highlight it? If it is not an imperative, any idea why it is highlighted? Thanks.
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Paul | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Aug 14 2018 6:35 PM

I am seeing the "me" (forgive the transliteration) as a negative particle or negative adverb if you prefer, but then the verb as a present active imperative.  Grammatically, the "me" particle isn't really significant...it is just a requirement for a negative command.  (Perhaps in some ways similar to our Don't) thus why it is rendered in English (by the NIV) "Don't deprive each other..."  Hope that helps.  

For study purposes...I like the NET translation which has a lot of footnotes for Hebrew and Greek that you might find helpful.

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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Aug 14 2018 10:21 PM

David Scott:
I have a Visual Filter called "NT Imperatives" that highlights all imperative verbs (@V??M). Logos is highlighting "Stop" in 1 Cor. 7:5 (NASB),

You will find this with reverse interlinear bibles, where the association of translated words to manuscript (Greek) words is not one-to-one. If you look at the Interlinear ribbon, you will see that that "Stop" is associated with the 2x negative parts of speech and the verb. That could have been avoided if the verb "depriving" was directly associated with its part of speech (as in the ESV). Using an original language resource (SBLGNT) will avoid these artifacts.

Dave
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Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Aug 14 2018 10:22 PM

David Scott:
Logos is highlighting "Stop" in 1 Cor. 7:5 (NASB), but a right-click suggests that it is a negative adverb (@BN) and a particle adverb (@TN) , but not an imperative.

Reverse Interlinear alignment in NASB could be improved. Currently Greek adverb & verb are aligned with "Stop depriving" while a better alignment would be adverb with Stop plus verb with depriving. Lexham English Bible has better reverse interlinear alignment in 1 Corinthians 7:5

Search

<LogosMorphGr ~ V??M????> ANDEQUALS (<LogosMorphGr ~ BN>)

finds six verses in NASB95 with five that could have reverse interlinear alignment improved:

David Scott:
Prohibition with μη.: The Aorist Subjunctive with the negative particle μή is used for a negative command, which is called prohibition.

Propositional Outline search for Command (Neg.) includes Aorist Subjunctive results

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