where to start with greek/hebrew?

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This post has 37 Replies | 4 Followers

Posts 425
Adam Olean | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jan 9 2019 1:29 PM

Adam Olean:

Hi, Landon. I would seriously consider Biblical Language Center's Live Video Classes. You won't regret it. There's a special discount for a husband and wife (or any other two from the same household) taking classes together. You can also get a discount from former students. Feel free to send me a private message via faithlife.com. (As an aside, I've greatly appreciated and benefited from James White's ministry as well!)

Here are some of my related posts for whatever they're worth:

http://ibiblio.org/bgreek/forum/viewtopic.php?p=30940&sid=3c1251fdcd99dd3a03376cd44492b6a6#p30934 

https://community.logos.com/forums/p/151448/927046.aspx#927046 

https://community.logos.com/forums/p/152646/930616.aspx#930616 

https://community.logos.com/forums/p/76863/929148.aspx#929148 

May God bless you and your wife in your studies! It'd be awesome to learn together.

I still couldn't recommend BLC's Live Video Classes more highly, despite my prior and growing experience with Biblical and Modern Hebrew. I'm just about to take a third semester with them. If they had offered these classes when I started Koine Greek and Biblical Hebrew, I would have begun with them in a heartbeat!

Here's a List of Hebrew Resources that some might find useful. It's a selective, collaborative list that I'm gradually working on with some other advanced students and instructors of both Biblical and Modern Hebrew.

Posts 170
Puddin’ | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 10 2019 12:53 AM

For what it‘s worth, as someone currently taking Greek II (obviously already had Greek I) & Hebrew I, I have found it true that Greek tends to get more difficult as you go along (think participles & infinitives 😡!) - while, as Dr. Van Pelt himself said in his class - Hebrew loads you down w. the difficult stuff at the beginning & tends to smooth out as you progress in the language.

The Hebrew vowel pointings, syllabification, plural (propretonic) reductions, etc. takes a while to sink in (well, it did for me at least).  But, there is nothing like when you finally begin to recognize words, forms, etc.  I have my NA27 in the pulpit of the church I pastor & love using it when someone else is preaching to try and follow along w. their selcted text (I do have NA28 & UBS-5 in software).  I had a lay preacher preach for me Sunday and I was able to translate & recognize most of his text right out of the Greek.

As an aside, I will be the odd man out and say that I have not at all been as persuaded by James White’s argumentation (I have actually interacted w. him quite extensively as my blog in my signature line demonstrates).  I do like his work in the discipline of KJVO & text criticism though (I have only had a beginners course in textual criticism).

Posts 170
Puddin’ | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 10 2019 1:07 AM

Adam Olean:

Adam Olean:

Hi, Landon. I would seriously consider Biblical Language Center's Live Video Classes. You won't regret it. There's a special discount for a husband and wife (or any other two from the same household) taking classes together. You can also get a discount from former students. Feel free to send me a private message via faithlife.com. (As an aside, I've greatly appreciated and benefited from James White's ministry as well!)

Here are some of my related posts for whatever they're worth:

http://ibiblio.org/bgreek/forum/viewtopic.php?p=30940&sid=3c1251fdcd99dd3a03376cd44492b6a6#p30934 

https://community.logos.com/forums/p/151448/927046.aspx#927046 

https://community.logos.com/forums/p/152646/930616.aspx#930616 

https://community.logos.com/forums/p/76863/929148.aspx#929148 

May God bless you and your wife in your studies! It'd be awesome to learn together.

I still couldn't recommend BLC's Live Video Classes more highly, despite my prior and growing experience with Biblical and Modern Hebrew. I'm just about to take a third semester with them. If they had offered these classes when I started Koine Greek and Biblical Hebrew, I would have begun with them in a heartbeat!

Here's a List of Hebrew Resources that some might find useful. It's a selective, collaborative list that I'm gradually working on with some other advanced students and instructors of both Biblical and Modern Hebrew.

I am currently taking Van Pelt’s Hebrew class.  Love it!  

BTW, Dr. Maury Robertson also offers classes online:  https://greekforeveryone.com/author/admin/

Dr. Robertson’s courses are only $8.00/Mo. and he is always available for difficult spots via either telephone or email.  He ALWAYS responds w.in a day or two (95% of the time it’s the next day).  His course is equivalent to one years worth of university morphology (you get a completion certificate stating so at the end).  He also has Greek II courses for the same amount.  

Posts 515
Hamilton Ramos | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 10 2019 3:23 AM

Hi Beloved:

With respect to your recommendations, are there parallel resources that can be used in the following?:

https://www.logos.com/product/9438/amg-bible-essentials

I ask because the exact title for the first resource is found in Kindle, but not in Logos.

How about:

https://www.logos.com/product/62010/new-testament-words

Posts 515
Hamilton Ramos | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 10 2019 5:11 AM

Hi Pudding:

You seem to me like someone that can do some innovative studies. So in that line consider the following:

Use some resources that use English grammar to facilitate learning of Koine like the ones in:

https://www.logos.com/products/search?q=English+grammar+for+greek

Then compare to other grammars in different languages to facilitate the understanding of commonalities and differences...

English grammar (base)______  Latin n Spanish grammar comparison to En base______  Koine Greek____ Biblical Hebrew_____ German.

So there could be a chance to see the commonalities of all (if exist), the main differences, and then have some theological considerations within some.

The final objective is to have a reading capability in them languages.

English: largest library available in L8.

Spanish: For those of us that master it, is an easier way to learn Koine Greek.

Koine Greek: NT obviously.

Latin: much of early theology was developed in that language. It is supposed to be a referent for the development of English and Spanish.

Hebrew: Understand Yahweh as one by study of OT theology n prophecy like in Zec 14:9.

German: Many good articles on theology, Biblical studies, etc. are in German and not translated.

The above languages can be put to good use in L8 and aid in research. Problem passages and concepts can then be studied from different angles for  comparison.

Just an idea for you to consider.

Posts 425
Adam Olean | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 10 2019 9:56 AM

Puddin’:

Adam Olean:

Adam Olean:

Hi, Landon. I would seriously consider Biblical Language Center's Live Video Classes. You won't regret it. There's a special discount for a husband and wife (or any other two from the same household) taking classes together. You can also get a discount from former students. Feel free to send me a private message via faithlife.com. (As an aside, I've greatly appreciated and benefited from James White's ministry as well!)

Here are some of my related posts for whatever they're worth:

http://ibiblio.org/bgreek/forum/viewtopic.php?p=30940&sid=3c1251fdcd99dd3a03376cd44492b6a6#p30934 

https://community.logos.com/forums/p/151448/927046.aspx#927046 

https://community.logos.com/forums/p/152646/930616.aspx#930616 

https://community.logos.com/forums/p/76863/929148.aspx#929148 

May God bless you and your wife in your studies! It'd be awesome to learn together.

I still couldn't recommend BLC's Live Video Classes more highly, despite my prior and growing experience with Biblical and Modern Hebrew. I'm just about to take a third semester with them. If they had offered these classes when I started Koine Greek and Biblical Hebrew, I would have begun with them in a heartbeat!

Here's a List of Hebrew Resources that some might find useful. It's a selective, collaborative list that I'm gradually working on with some other advanced students and instructors of both Biblical and Modern Hebrew.

I am currently taking Van Pelt’s Hebrew class.  Love it!  

BTW, Dr. Maury Robertson also offers classes online:  https://greekforeveryone.com/author/admin/

Dr. Robertson’s courses are only $8.00/Mo. and he is always available for difficult spots via either telephone or email.  He ALWAYS responds w.in a day or two (95% of the time it’s the next day).  His course is equivalent to one years worth of university morphology (you get a completion certificate stating so at the end).  He also has Greek II courses for the same amount.  

Good to know! I'm glad to hear those classes are working out so well for you. Even as someone who often prefers studying on my own, I recognize that a good instructor can definitely be a boon. Likewise, with good classmates!

BLC's Live Video Classes are different from most in that 90–95%+ of class time is spent in the target language: listening, speaking, reading, communicating/dialoguing, and playing in the language. The first part of Living Biblical Hebrew includes video-picture lessons, in which you absorb Hebrew as Hebrew (or Greek as Greek), not just learning about a language that you don't actually know or haven't begun internalizing as a second-language. They begin immediately with words, phrases, and full sentences that develop eventually into short stories. The picture lessons transition from watching, listening, and speaking to passively and actively reading, as text is added alongside the pictures and audio. As a translator and linguist with several decades of experience, Buth's materials offer plenty for those who want to sink their teeth into the finer points of grammar and translation—along with so many other aspects of the languages (literary, discourse/text linguistics, phonology, etc.). They prioritize internalizing the language, however, through second-language acquisition techniques and processes. It's a lot of fun too, oftentimes like going back and being a kid again playing in the language!

Posts 2162
Beloved | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 10 2019 1:51 PM

Hamilton Ramos:

Hi Beloved:

With respect to your recommendations, are there parallel resources that can be used in the following?:

https://www.logos.com/product/9438/amg-bible-essentials

I ask because the exact title for the first resource is found in Kindle, but not in Logos.

How about:

https://www.logos.com/product/62010/new-testament-words

Hi Hamilton!

I hope I don't muddle your meaning. AMG is the publisher of the Key Word Study Bible as far as I know it is only available in paper format. However, as you have discovered Spiros is the author of two lexical aids that key off of Strong's numbers for both Hebrew and Greek and work in parallel with many other lexical resources available in Logos format.

If you desire to stay with resources available in Logos format the AMG bundle is a terrific buy. I own it and used it a great deal early on. I now, however, prefer BDB, DBL, and HALOT for Hebrew and BDAG and Louw Nida for Greek. As far as  New Testament Words, I'm unfamiliar with it so I can give you no opinion on it. 

Meanwhile, Jesus kept on growing wiser and more mature, and in favor with God and his fellow man.

International Standard Version. (2011). (Lk 2:52). Yorba Linda, CA: ISV Foundation.

Posts 170
Puddin’ | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jan 11 2019 1:38 AM

Adam Olean:

Puddin’:

Adam Olean:

Adam Olean:

Hi, Landon. I would seriously consider Biblical Language Center's Live Video Classes. You won't regret it. There's a special discount for a husband and wife (or any other two from the same household) taking classes together. You can also get a discount from former students. Feel free to send me a private message via faithlife.com. (As an aside, I've greatly appreciated and benefited from James White's ministry as well!)

Here are some of my related posts for whatever they're worth:

http://ibiblio.org/bgreek/forum/viewtopic.php?p=30940&sid=3c1251fdcd99dd3a03376cd44492b6a6#p30934 

https://community.logos.com/forums/p/151448/927046.aspx#927046 

https://community.logos.com/forums/p/152646/930616.aspx#930616 

https://community.logos.com/forums/p/76863/929148.aspx#929148 

May God bless you and your wife in your studies! It'd be awesome to learn together.

I still couldn't recommend BLC's Live Video Classes more highly, despite my prior and growing experience with Biblical and Modern Hebrew. I'm just about to take a third semester with them. If they had offered these classes when I started Koine Greek and Biblical Hebrew, I would have begun with them in a heartbeat!

Here's a List of Hebrew Resources that some might find useful. It's a selective, collaborative list that I'm gradually working on with some other advanced students and instructors of both Biblical and Modern Hebrew.

I am currently taking Van Pelt’s Hebrew class.  Love it!  

BTW, Dr. Maury Robertson also offers classes online:  https://greekforeveryone.com/author/admin/

Dr. Robertson’s courses are only $8.00/Mo. and he is always available for difficult spots via either telephone or email.  He ALWAYS responds w.in a day or two (95% of the time it’s the next day).  His course is equivalent to one years worth of university morphology (you get a completion certificate stating so at the end).  He also has Greek II courses for the same amount.  

Good to know! I'm glad to hear those classes are working out so well for you. Even as someone who often prefers studying on my own, I recognize that a good instructor can definitely be a boon. Likewise, with good classmates!

BLC's Live Video Classes are different from most in that 90–95%+ of class time is spent in the target language: listening, speaking, reading, communicating/dialoguing, and playing in the language. The first part of Living Biblical Hebrew includes video-picture lessons, in which you absorb Hebrew as Hebrew (or Greek as Greek), not just learning about a language that you don't actually know or haven't begun internalizing as a second-language. They begin immediately with words, phrases, and full sentences that develop eventually into short stories. The picture lessons transition from watching, listening, and speaking to passively and actively reading, as text is added alongside the pictures and audio. As a translator and linguist with several decades of experience, Buth's materials offer plenty for those who want to sink their teeth into the finer points of grammar and translation—along with so many other aspects of the languages (literary, discourse/text linguistics, phonology, etc.). They prioritize internalizing the language, however, through second-language acquisition techniques and processes. It's a lot of fun too, oftentimes like going back and being a kid again playing in the language!

I have looked into Buth’s courses, but have already made much headway in the courses I have been taking.  My aim is to complete these courses, then probably spring for Buth’s courses to further cement the experience.  I even looked into the immersion courses in Greece & Jerusalem (although they are extremely spendy).  Excellent review above 👍.  Will reread this several times.

Posts 170
Puddin’ | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jan 11 2019 2:00 AM

Hamilton Ramos:

Hi Pudding:

You seem to me like someone that can do some innovative studies. So in that line consider the following:

Use some resources that use English grammar to facilitate learning of Koine like the ones in:

https://www.logos.com/products/search?q=English+grammar+for+greek

Then compare to other grammars in different languages to facilitate the understanding of commonalities and differences...

English grammar (base)______  Latin n Spanish grammar comparison to En base______  Koine Greek____ Biblical Hebrew_____ German.

So there could be a chance to see the commonalities of all (if exist), the main differences, and then have some theological considerations within some.

The final objective is to have a reading capability in them languages.

English: largest library available in L8.

Spanish: For those of us that master it, is an easier way to learn Koine Greek.

Koine Greek: NT obviously.

Latin: much of early theology was developed in that language. It is supposed to be a referent for the development of English and Spanish.

Hebrew: Understand Yahweh as one by study of OT theology n prophecy like in Zec 14:9.

German: Many good articles on theology, Biblical studies, etc. are in German and not translated.

The above languages can be put to good use in L8 and aid in research. Problem passages and concepts can then be studied from different angles for  comparison.

Just an idea for you to consider.

Good points.  I esp. like the link you provided above.  However, I do wonder what else those sources would bring to the table since I already have:

Dana & Mantey; Wallace’s GGBB; Mounce’s BBG (both the book and video), Blass, Debrunner, Funk’s Grammar; A.T. Robertson’s Large Grammar & Word Pictures, Grimm-Thayer (I know it’s antiquated), Diesmann’s Grammar; Moulton & Milligan, literally volumes upon volumes of exegetical commentaries (e.g., NICGT), BDAG (& BAGD), HALOT, numerous Hebrew grammars, an entire GNT sentence diagram, two entire HOT (Hebrew OT) trees, NIDNTTE, NIDOTTE, UBS-5, NA28 (&27) w. Critical Apparatus‘s, Classes on Text Criticism, LXX parsed, BHS parsed, BDB Lexicon, NET w. notes, Metzger’s Textual Commentary, Louw-Nida, Wuest, Waltke, UBS OT & NT Handbooks, EDNT, Scrivner’s TR (🙄), Constantine Campbell’s works on verbal aspect and recent Greek Advances in the NT, ALGNT, a Greek professor on monthly pay for when I get stuck....Well, I think you get the picture (have tons more).

So, I guess I am just asking if there is any benefit to continue acquiring grammars, etc.?  The only other work I want right now is the CNTTS (that I keep waiting to drop in price).  I am really excited over what they are doing right now in Muenster, Germany w. CBGM NT apparatus, but it will decades before completion as I understand it.

Thanks much for these suggestions!  

Posts 170
Puddin’ | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jan 18 2019 9:49 PM

Puddin’:

Hamilton Ramos:

Hi Pudding:

You seem to me like someone that can do some innovative studies. So in that line consider the following:

Use some resources that use English grammar to facilitate learning of Koine like the ones in:

https://www.logos.com/products/search?q=English+grammar+for+greek

Then compare to other grammars in different languages to facilitate the understanding of commonalities and differences...

English grammar (base)______  Latin n Spanish grammar comparison to En base______  Koine Greek____ Biblical Hebrew_____ German.

So there could be a chance to see the commonalities of all (if exist), the main differences, and then have some theological considerations within some.

The final objective is to have a reading capability in them languages.

English: largest library available in L8.

Spanish: For those of us that master it, is an easier way to learn Koine Greek.

Koine Greek: NT obviously.

Latin: much of early theology was developed in that language. It is supposed to be a referent for the development of English and Spanish.

Hebrew: Understand Yahweh as one by study of OT theology n prophecy like in Zec 14:9.

German: Many good articles on theology, Biblical studies, etc. are in German and not translated.

The above languages can be put to good use in L8 and aid in research. Problem passages and concepts can then be studied from different angles for  comparison.

Just an idea for you to consider.

Good points.  I esp. like the link you provided above.  However, I do wonder what else those sources would bring to the table since I already have:

Dana & Mantey; Wallace’s GGBB; Mounce’s BBG (both the book and video), Blass, Debrunner, Funk’s Grammar; A.T. Robertson’s Large Grammar & Word Pictures, Grimm-Thayer (I know it’s antiquated), Diesmann’s Grammar; Moulton & Milligan, literally volumes upon volumes of exegetical commentaries (e.g., NICGT), BDAG (& BAGD), HALOT, numerous Hebrew grammars, an entire GNT sentence diagram, two entire HOT (Hebrew OT) trees, NIDNTTE, NIDOTTE, UBS-5, NA28 (&27) w. Critical Apparatus‘s, Classes on Text Criticism, LXX parsed, BHS parsed, BDB Lexicon, NET w. notes, Metzger’s Textual Commentary, Louw-Nida, Wuest, Waltke, UBS OT & NT Handbooks, EDNT, Scrivner’s TR (🙄), Constantine Campbell’s works on verbal aspect and recent Greek Advances in the NT, ALGNT, a Greek professor on monthly pay for when I get stuck....Well, I think you get the picture (have tons more).

So, I guess I am just asking if there is any benefit to continue acquiring grammars, etc.?  The only other work I want right now is the CNTTS (that I keep waiting to drop in price).  I am really excited over what they are doing right now in Muenster, Germany w. CBGM NT apparatus, but it will decades before completion as I understand it.

Thanks much for these suggestions!  

Just bumping this thread hoping for a response to my question above.  I am always on the lookout for more exegetical resources, but, I am beginning to wonder if I am just wasting money at this point.

Any advice would be much appreciated.

Posts 6108
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 19 2019 9:06 AM

You have plenty. Don’t spend more money 💰 

Posts 180
Matt Hamrick | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 19 2019 9:20 AM

Landon, since you already do Mobile Ed you should start with the courses for learning the language Mobile Ed produces. You should also acquire Zondervan's courses that teach Greek and Hebrew and the videos you can also acquire. That's four different instructor's (2 Greek, 2 Hebrew) teaching first year grammar which will give you a foundation for greater studies later. Be consistent and help each other. It is possible to learn the languages using the bible software. But it will take time and consistency. Enjoy your studies.

Posts 425
Adam Olean | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 19 2019 10:14 AM

Puddin’:

Just bumping this thread hoping for a response to my question above.  I am always on the lookout for more exegetical resources, but, I am beginning to wonder if I am just wasting money at this point.

Any advice would be much appreciated.

Well, as it has been said before, reading grammars will make you good/skilled at reading grammars, reading Hebrew and Greek will make you good/skilled at reading Hebrew and Greek. That goes for listening, speaking, and writing too! I've often seen a Greek and Latin teacher make that point, as well as Randall Buth.

As for grammars, Buth's Living Biblical Hebrew and Koine Greek materials are actually more linguistically informed and up-to-date than many beginning-to-intermediate grammars and will take you quite a ways (esp. in the footnotes). Eventually it can be helpful to own some of the core, intermediate-to-advanced reference grammars (e.g., for Hebrew that would include BHRG, Joüon-Muraoka, Waltke-O'Connor, and GKC). Biblical Hebrew Reference Grammar, Second Edition is an excellent resource! It's rather convenient being able to search for biblical references via Logos's Exegetical Guide when you have a difficult question or encounter an apparent grammatical oddity in the text (although some of these could involve orthographic or textual variation as well). There are more detailed monographs and journals that provide focused, detailed studies on advanced subjects, but these probably wouldn't be useful to most people. I've often found reading skilled linguists and sometimes more generally in the broader field of linguistics more helpful and informative than reading at least many, present-day biblical scholars (on linguistics). Thankfully, there are linguists like Randall Buth and Steven Runge—among many others, including some at Faithlife—who are applying relevant research and insights more directly to biblical studies in a more accessible way.

Having said all of that, nothing beats internalizing the languages for oneself! It looks to me like you have more than enough grammars in addition to many other resources. I'd save and invest in other resources like Living Biblical Hebrew Live Video Classes and—if you're interested in the benefits of Modern Hebrew—Pimsleur Hebrew, which can often be borrowed from a library. It can be cheaper to acquire it in digital audio format from Audible if you get an excellent deal on credits or come across a rare sale. I've already linked to a growing list of Hebrew resources—many of them free!—that would aid students and teachers pursuing fluency in Hebrew, especially those that already have or are currently developing a solid foundation. You'll be much better off spending your time focused on internalizing the biblical languages and immersing yourself in the text of Scripture.

That's a long, round-about answer, but I hope it helps!

Posts 425
Adam Olean | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 19 2019 10:17 AM

DAL:

You have plenty. Don’t spend more money 💰 

It would have been easier to just quote DAL and give the Yes

Posts 170
Puddin’ | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 19 2019 9:22 PM

Adam Olean:

Puddin’:

Just bumping this thread hoping for a response to my question above.  I am always on the lookout for more exegetical resources, but, I am beginning to wonder if I am just wasting money at this point.

Any advice would be much appreciated.

Well, as it has been said before, reading grammars will make you good/skilled at reading grammars, reading Hebrew and Greek will make you good/skilled at reading Hebrew and Greek. That goes for listening, speaking, and writing too! I've often seen a Greek and Latin teacher make that point, as well as Randall Buth.

As for grammars, Buth's Living Biblical Hebrew and Koine Greek materials are actually more linguistically informed and up-to-date than many beginning-to-intermediate grammars and will take you quite a ways (esp. in the footnotes). Eventually it can be helpful to own some of the core, intermediate-to-advanced reference grammars (e.g., for Hebrew that would include BHRG, Joüon-Muraoka, Waltke-O'Connor, and GKC). Biblical Hebrew Reference Grammar, Second Edition is an excellent resource! It's rather convenient being able to search for biblical references via Logos's Exegetical Guide when you have a difficult question or encounter an apparent grammatical oddity in the text (although some of these could involve orthographic or textual variation as well). There are more detailed monographs and journals that provide focused, detailed studies on advanced subjects, but these probably wouldn't be useful to most people. I've often found reading skilled linguists and sometimes more generally in the broader field of linguistics more helpful and informative than reading at least many, present-day biblical scholars (on linguistics). Thankfully, there are linguists like Randall Buth and Steven Runge—among many others, including some at Faithlife—who are applying relevant research and insights more directly to biblical studies in a more accessible way.

Having said all of that, nothing beats internalizing the languages for oneself! It looks to me like you have more than enough grammars in addition to many other resources. I'd save and invest in other resources like Living Biblical Hebrew Live Video Classes and—if you're interested in the benefits of Modern Hebrew—Pimsleur Hebrew, which can often be borrowed from a library. It can be cheaper to acquire it in digital audio format from Audible if you get an excellent deal on credits or come across a rare sale. I've already linked to a growing list of Hebrew resources—many of them free!—that would aid students and teachers pursuing fluency in Hebrew, especially those that already have or are currently developing a solid foundation. You'll be much better off spending your time focused on internalizing the biblical languages and immersing yourself in the text of Scripture.

That's a long, round-about answer, but I hope it helps!

Ok, thanks much Adam.  I am currently taking Van Pelt’s BBH courses and have learned a ton already.  After I complete this course I will look further into Buth’s courses.  (Just not sure I could take the live video courses inasmuch as I am quite technologically challenged 🤓!)  I do have a MacBook Air though so maybe I could figure it out.

Thank you again!

Posts 928
Matthew | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jan 20 2019 3:40 AM

Quite a number of knowledgeable individuals on this thread! Are the video lectures on Hebrew by Van Pelt more thorough than those of Futato? It was mentioned in another thread that HB101 "only covers less than half the content of the Grammar." I already have Futato's grammar in Logos but not Van Pelt's, and I am trying to decide if I want to use the coupon code from my Logos 8 base package for HB101 or for something else. I do not know which video lecture would be better, and I am also trying to weigh the usefulness of HB101 vs. the "daily dose" available elsewhere that seems to also use Futato. Any advice?

Posts 170
Puddin’ | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jan 20 2019 6:22 PM

Matthew:

Quite a number of knowledgeable individuals on this thread! Are the video lectures on Hebrew by Van Pelt more thorough than those of Futato? It was mentioned in another thread that HB101 "only covers less than half the content of the Grammar." I already have Futato's grammar in Logos but not Van Pelt's, and I am trying to decide if I want to use the coupon code from my Logos 8 base package for HB101 or for something else. I do not know which video lecture would be better, and I am also trying to weigh the usefulness of HB101 vs. the "daily dose" available elsewhere that seems to also use Futato. Any advice?

Personally, I find Van Pelt’s work easy to follow.  I am certain that Futato’s material is good also.  What I like about Van Pelt’s classes is that he provides the rules, exceptions to the rules, and then offers a succinct short-cut to weed out all of the rules.  For example, I just finished the classes on the definite article and conjunctions.  After quite a list of rules, exceptions, etc., Van Pelt states, “If you want to bypass all these rules, 99% of the time that you see a Waw w. a Shewa under it prefixed onto a Hebrew term, translate the Waw as ‘and‘ & you’ll have it right.”

He does this type of thing a lot...which really removes some of the pressure.  I especially like that I can watch his classes over & over & over until it really sinks in (I realize you can do the same thing w. Futato‘s classes).  I watched the noun classes about 6 times 😳...and will likely do the same thing w. Hebrew preposition (which I started last night).

Just my 2 cents.

Posts 928
Matthew | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jan 20 2019 6:31 PM

Puddin’:
Just my 2 cents.

And a very helpful 2 cents at that! Thank you!

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