Theology Guide

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John Fidel | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 30 2018 6:01 AM

Donovan R. Palmer:

Kyle B

I notice in the video two other guides - Biblical Place and Historical Theology.  Are these future guides that are coming out, or user defined?

Hi Donovan,

From the icon in the video it looks like the Historical Theology is a custom Topic Guide. At the bottom of the guide menu is get more shared which allows you to download shared guides. I looked and did not see this guide, but found a Theology Guide (passage) by Phil Gons that is interesting.

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Sean Boisen | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 30 2018 6:57 AM

PL:

No, when I click on the picture in the Theology Guide, it opens the same picture in a Media window. Not super helpful... I was expecting clicking on one of the other "stations" would bring up a Theology Guide of that other topic.

The images in the Theology Guide and Lexham Survey of Theology resource are "thumbnails": clicking the image opens a larger, higher-resolution version in MediaTool that's easier to see, and that can be copied into presentations and shared with others. There are also multiple aspect ratios (4x3, 16x9, 22x9) to support different projection scenarios.

This is especially helpful for the expanded version of the Overview image at the beginning of the resource: with 234 different topics, there's a lot going on here.

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Sean Boisen | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 30 2018 7:14 AM

Mark Barnes:

Graham Criddle:
At the moment five systematic theology resources have been linked in:

Just to clarify this. There are several sections in the Theology Guide. Recommended Reading is a hand-curated bibliography for every theological topic. It will include resources you already own, and those you may not. It's is selective, broad and can be considered "finished".

There's also a section that searches your own library for tagged resources related to that topic. It's this section that only contains the small handful of systematic theologies that were referenced earlier.  But truthfully, it's possibly a less useful section because it's not hand-curated.

While it's correct that we've only done comprehensive annotation on five systematic theologies so far, the Systematic Theologies section of the Theology Guide is not an automated search. Jessica Parks went through each of these five theologies for each of the 234 Systematic Theology topics and annotated the corresponding spans of text addressing these topics.

Note i said "spans", which has an important benefit: you can search within these annotations. For example, here are instances of the word "heart" in texts that address the theological topic of Human Will:

In that example I searched systematic theologies, but you can also search your Bibles, in which case you're searching within the Key Passages that have been annotated for this topic:

This is a very powerful search feature that would not be possible without the extensive curation that went into the Lexham Survey of Theology.

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Sean Boisen | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 30 2018 7:24 AM

Donovan R. Palmer:

Kyle B

I notice in the video two other guides - Biblical Place and Historical Theology.  Are these future guides that are coming out, or user defined?

You're probably thinking of sections that have been available in Guides before, but can now be accessed independently.

The first of these is new: it's a workflow (note the shape has a small point to the right) for studying biblical places. The second is the Biblical Places section of the Passage Guide: entering a Bible reference will provide information about places that are mentioned in that passage.

The third is the corresponding section from the Topic Guide, which will have similar information, but for a topic (like Galilee) rather than a Bible passage.

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Sean | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 30 2018 7:35 AM

Sean Boisen:
While it's correct that we've only done comprehensive annotation on five systematic theologies so far, the Systematic Theologies section of the Theology Guide is not an automated search. Jessica Parks went through each of these five theologies for each of the 234 Systematic Theology topics and annotated the corresponding spans of text addressing these topics.

I would guess the bolded words here are the key ones, but what is the plan for this guide? How quickly can we expect this to get filled out further? (I know you guys are allergic to giving out dates, but some general idea would be nice.) I can understand starting with these selected works, with their detailed and fairly standard structures, as opposed to more creative works of systematics, but as it is, it seems very limited to me. (I have not purchased yet.)

I'd really like to get a better feel for the direction of this tool before I shell out a couple hundred dollars for it. I don't really need the full feature set otherwise; I want to know if this will really help me as an ecumenical theologian.

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Mike Tourangeau | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 30 2018 7:35 AM

Sean Boisen:
This is a very powerful search feature that would not be possible without the extensive curation that went into the Lexham Survey of Theology.

Wow, this IS powerful. Can you tell us how many systematic theologies you plan to annotate?

A question about how this works. When I search {Section <LSTO scripture>} in my bible it pulls us an impressive array of verses associated with the search. Is this getting the verses from the Systematic theologies that have been annotated? What is going on "under the hood" if you can say....

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Sean Boisen | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 30 2018 9:03 AM

Mike Tourangeau:

Wow, this IS powerful. Can you tell us how many systematic theologies you plan to annotate?

You can expect that we'll annotate most major systematic theologies in Logos.

Mike Tourangeau:

A question about how this works. When I search {Section <LSTO scripture>} in my bible it pulls us an impressive array of verses associated with the search. Is this getting the verses from the Systematic theologies that have been annotated? What is going on "under the hood" if you can say....

More precisely, we've curated data on the key systematic theology topics (we call this the Lexham Systematic Theology Ontology, or LSTO), which is the information structure for the Survey. External contributors who were chosen for their expertise then supplied the article content, recommended Resources, and Key Verses for each topic.

So a search for an individual LSTO topic, like {Section <LSTO The Trinity and Scripture>} is just searching the same Key Verses as the Theology Guide displays (though this can be expanded into more interesting searches).

In your example, "scripture" is an alias for <LSTO The Bible>: so a search for {Section <LSTO Scripture>} shows all the key verses from this topic (which happens to be a fairly long list).

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Rob Lambert | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 30 2018 1:43 PM

I am not getting something.   I am looking at the Lexham Survey of Theology, Topic: The Kingdom of God.

A recommended resource is: 

Jesus and the Kingdom (Ladd)

I cannot find this resource in Logos even though I thought that the recommended resources were in Logos.

Is this normal?  Am I wrong?  

Neat resource and it will be valuable to me....I note that most of the recommended resources are locked or grayed out. I can't even find this Ladd resource and I do own all 5 systematic theologies included to date.

I am pretty sure I am missing something.

Any assistance is appreciated.

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NB.Mick | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 30 2018 1:55 PM

Rob Lambert:

 I am looking at the Lexham Survey of Theology, Topic: The Kingdom of God.

A recommended resource is: 

Jesus and the Kingdom (Ladd)

I cannot find this resource in Logos even though I thought that the recommended resources were in Logos.

Is this normal?  Am I wrong?  

Unfortunately, it seems you are. As has been explained somewhere by the FL creators of the LST, the Recommended Resources have been supplied by the articles' authors - i.e. in this case presumably by Gerald Bray. Some of those may be Logos resources, and they will show as dark gray open books or dark gray locks, depending on whether you own a license to the resource. But some may not be Logos resources, and they show up as light grey open books(edit: and black text, instead of blue text indication a Logos link /edit), such as Ladd's Jesus and the Kingdom:

(I've looked for a proper bibliography of the non-Logos books recommended, but couldn't find any)

Running Verbum 7 and Logos 8 latest (beta) version on Win 10

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Kenneth Neighoff | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 30 2018 1:55 PM

Rod,

In the video for the Theology Guide, I believe it says that some of the recommended resources are not in Logos, they were recommended as good resources to read by the one who wrote the article And Logos kept the in the guide even though that resource is nit in Logos.  

Those in Logos has the blue link, those that are in Logos and not in your library will have the lock icon. 

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Rob Lambert | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 30 2018 2:59 PM

Thank you guys. The video says that all of the recommended resources are available in Logos,.... 

This explanation helps me.

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Sean | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Oct 31 2018 4:36 AM

Sean Boisen:
You can expect that we'll annotate most major systematic theologies in Logos.

Could you elaborate more on your plans for this please? I know it's against policy to give a time frame, but a general idea of your plan would be nice. Right now, this tool is the deciding factor as to whether or not I'll go for an upgrade or just stay put with L7. It looks good with great potential, but being indexed to only 5 very conservative North American evangelical theologies means that it's practically useless to me in its present state of development. Please give me some concrete assurance that this is going to become useful in a reasonable span of time. (That is, not everything needs to be in it overnight, but it should be steadily improved at a rate that can be noticed and appreciated by the user. Months, not years, with recognition that some works like Barth's CD may well be impossible to integrate into such a system.)

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Graham Owen | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Oct 31 2018 5:04 AM

Mark Barnes:
Just to clarify this. There are several sections in the Theology Guide. Recommended Reading is a hand-curated bibliography for every theological topic. It will include resources you already own, and those you may not. It's is selective, broad and can be considered "finished".

Hi Mark

Is there a defined "tradition" for the hand curated lists? Or put another way, can you offer any insight to the criteria used to "recommend" a particular article, author or book.

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Sean Boisen | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Oct 31 2018 9:27 AM

Graham Owen:

Mark Barnes:
Just to clarify this. There are several sections in the Theology Guide. Recommended Reading is a hand-curated bibliography for every theological topic. It will include resources you already own, and those you may not. It's is selective, broad and can be considered "finished".

Hi Mark

Is there a defined "tradition" for the hand curated lists? Or put another way, can you offer any insight to the criteria used to "recommend" a particular article, author or book.

(Not Mark, but ...)

The Recommended Resources come from the authors of the individual articles, and therefore reflect those author's choices. Our editorial direction was to take a broad and inclusive perspective ("small 'o' orthodox") on the topic, rather than a narrow reflection of a particular tradition.

For those authors that have Factbook pages, their bylines are hyperlinked, which might tell you something about their backgrounds.

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Michael S. | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Oct 31 2018 9:36 AM

Sean:
but being indexed to only 5 very conservative North American evangelical theologies means that it's practically useless to me in its present state of development.

Surprise

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Steve Farson | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Oct 31 2018 9:41 AM

Also looking forward to many, many more systematic theologies indexed/linked to the guide. 

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Mark Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Oct 31 2018 9:41 AM

Sean:
but being indexed to only 5 very conservative North American evangelical theologies means that it's practically useless to me in its present state of development.

I, too, hope it will expand significantly, but I imagine this has already been a daunting task. It might help to recommend some theologies you'd like to see included. That might help FL prioritize their effort. 

Pastor, North Park Baptist Church

Bridgeport, CT USA

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Sean Boisen | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Oct 31 2018 9:47 AM

Sean:

Sean Boisen:
You can expect that we'll annotate most major systematic theologies in Logos.

Could you elaborate more on your plans for this please? I know it's against policy to give a time frame, but a general idea of your plan would be nice. Right now, this tool is the deciding factor as to whether or not I'll go for an upgrade or just stay put with L7. It looks good with great potential, but being indexed to only 5 very conservative North American evangelical theologies means that it's practically useless to me in its present state of development. Please give me some concrete assurance that this is going to become useful in a reasonable span of time. (That is, not everything needs to be in it overnight, but it should be steadily improved at a rate that can be noticed and appreciated by the user. Months, not years, with recognition that some works like Barth's CD may well be impossible to integrate into such a system.)

I can give you concrete assurance that it's already useful for me, and i suspect, for many others Smile

We currently have more than 300 systematic theologies on offer at logos.com, and there's no automated way to do this kind of annotation (that's part of what makes it especially valuable). Our highest priority will be those resources that impact most of our users, which is a combination of most owned, most used, and most important to the field (of course, that last attribute is hard to quantify objectively). How much effort this alignment will take depends greatly on the specific resource, as you suggest, and we have to weigh the cost of this annotation against the value of the book to our customers (one of many reasons Logos resources often cost more than Kindle editions). Some resources may have too few users to justify the cost.

I expect the progress will be noticeable on the scale of months. I also predict (with high confidence) it won't be fast enough to satisfy our users: it won't be fast enough to satisfy me, either. But we're committed to this project, and our goal is to annotate as many systematic theology resources as make sense.

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Kenneth Neighoff | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Oct 31 2018 9:55 AM

Sean Boisen:

Sean:

Sean Boisen:
You can expect that we'll annotate most major systematic theologies in Logos.

Could you elaborate more on your plans for this please? I know it's against policy to give a time frame, but a general idea of your plan would be nice. Right now, this tool is the deciding factor as to whether or not I'll go for an upgrade or just stay put with L7. It looks good with great potential, but being indexed to only 5 very conservative North American evangelical theologies means that it's practically useless to me in its present state of development. Please give me some concrete assurance that this is going to become useful in a reasonable span of time. (That is, not everything needs to be in it overnight, but it should be steadily improved at a rate that can be noticed and appreciated by the user. Months, not years, with recognition that some works like Barth's CD may well be impossible to integrate into such a system.)

I can give you concrete assurance that it's already useful for me, and i suspect, for many others Smile

We currently have more than 300 systematic theologies on offer at logos.com, and there's no automated way to do this kind of annotation (that's part of what makes it especially valuable). Our highest priority will be those resources that impact most of our users, which is a combination of most owned, most used, and most important to the field (of course, that last attribute is hard to quantify objectively). How much effort this alignment will take depends greatly on the specific resource, as you suggest, and we have to weigh the cost of this annotation against the value of the book to our customers (one of many reasons Logos resources often cost more than Kindle editions). Some resources may have too few users to justify the cost.

I expect the progress will be noticeable on the scale of months. I also predict (with high confidence) it won't be fast enough to satisfy our users: it won't be fast enough to satisfy me, either. But we're committed to this project, and our goal is to annotate as many systematic theology resources as make sense.

Sean,

And if you don't get to those in the Wesleyan-Holiness Camp soon enough, I know how to find the sections I am looking for through search in Logos and having used the print version of the Logos resources, for years before having them in Logos.   Sometimes we just forget how to do things "old school". 

I love this new resource and look forward to using it as I teach Theology during the Spring term.

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Sean Boisen | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Oct 31 2018 10:03 AM

Mark Smith:

Sean:
but being indexed to only 5 very conservative North American evangelical theologies means that it's practically useless to me in its present state of development.

I, too, hope it will expand significantly, but I imagine this has already been a daunting task. It might help to recommend some theologies you'd like to see included. That might help FL prioritize their effort. 

That's a very positive suggestion, Mark. Feel free to join the Faithlife group for Lexham Survey of Theology and make recommendations for resources you'd like to see annotated, or add other suggestions for improvements. You could also post them on this forum thread.

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