What am I missing ִin DCH IX?

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Posts 578
Steve Maling | Forum Activity | Posted: Mon, Jun 10 2019 7:11 PM

I can't find a way to navigate within the new Volume IX of The Dictionary of Classical Hebrew. All I can do is move through the "English-Hebrew Index"  manually.

Posts 2465
Lee | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jun 11 2019 12:56 AM

The "Table of Contents" looks rather sparse.

An index with the alphabets A, B, C... would be better, but it's hard to suggest an improvement.

Posts 914
LogosEmployee
Kyle G. Anderson | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jun 11 2019 8:32 AM

We're putting out an update today that allows you to navigate via English headword.

Posts 2237
Beloved | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jun 11 2019 9:08 AM

Kyle G. Anderson:

We're putting out an update today that allows you to navigate via English headword.

Thanks, Kyle

A vital intervention. Reignites my interest in this volume.

Meanwhile, Jesus kept on growing wiser and more mature, and in favor with God and his fellow man.

International Standard Version. (2011). (Lk 2:52). Yorba Linda, CA: ISV Foundation.

Posts 2465
Lee | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jun 11 2019 9:12 AM

Kyle G. Anderson:

We're putting out an update today that allows you to navigate via English headword.

Expectations exceeded. Cool

Posts 578
Steve Maling | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jun 11 2019 10:21 AM

Many, many thanks, Kyle!

Posts 1544
John Kight | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jun 11 2019 11:50 AM

I might be missing something, so please forgive my ignorance, but why would I want a volume dedicated to indexes in Logos? How are you using or planning to use this volume in your studies? I really want to complete the set (my own problem), but I want to know how others are planning on using it. 

-John

For book reviews and more visit sojotheo.com 

Posts 578
Steve Maling | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jun 11 2019 12:18 PM

Hello, John, This is how the "Introduction" of the DCH answers your good question.

We see several kinds of use to which this Index can be put.
First, it offers the student of Hebrew, both beginner and advanced scholar, a resource for identifying the Hebrew for rare or forgotten terms. . . .  You could of course look up an English concordance, find an occurrence of the term you were interested in and then look it up in your Hebrew Bible to see which Hebrew word it was translating; this Index volume is an easier way of achieving the same end, and it does of course give you access to the hundreds of Classical Hebrew words that will not appear in any concordance of the Hebrew Bible. It should also be remembered that DCH offers many more translational equivalents for Hebrew words than a standard English Bible translation can give; its collection of index terms is unparalleled in size.
Second (and this seems a much more important use), if you are contemplating a particular concept in the Hebrew Bible or studying an object in its material world, for example, you might want to see at a glance the  Hebrew words used for that concept or object. You could look up anger, change, pain, praise, salvation, or food, fool, foot, forest or fortress, to take a few words at random, and see a list of all Hebrew terms for which your English word was used as a translation in DCH. You would then have the foundation of a semantic field. This use would be for what we might call a synthetic study of the Hebrew vocabulary.
Third, the Index could enable an analytic study of the vocabulary. If you wondered what synonyms existed to a word you were considering and what differences there may have been among the various synonyms or near-synonyms, you could quickly get started on your research by looking up an English term in the Index, and moving from the Hebrew terms listed there to the relevant articles in the Dictionary itself.
Fourth, the Index includes all the Hebrew words in The Dictionary of Classical Hebrew, which is to say, many more words than have appeared in any previous Hebrew dictionary. In addition to the c. 8,400 words or lemmas in lexica of the twentieth century, The Dictionary of Classical Hebrew presents 3,635 ‘new words’ that have either been identified in the past hundred years in newly discovered texts like the Dead Sea Scrolls or been proposed for our older texts by philologists. The Index thus constitutes a unique point of entry to this mass of invaluable new data.
Fifth, the Index offers a standing invitation to test one’s knowledge of Hebrew vocabulary. Open a page at random and see if you are not tempted to check whether you know the Hebrew words for the English terms that appear.
Finally, if you use an electronic version of DCH, do not suppose that being able to search the whole text of the Dictionary electronically will obviate the need for the present Index. For you can search electronically only for terms you already know; you will not be able to find terms with similar meanings, or terms in the same semantic field. For that, you need this Index.

David J. A. Clines, ed., The Dictionary of Classical Hebrew: English–Hebrew Index; Word Frequency Table, vol. IX (Sheffield: Sheffield Phoenix Press, 2016), 10–11.

Posts 9969
Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jun 11 2019 2:21 PM

An excellent summary by Steve.

For me (and then thinking, of course), I wondered what english they were linking to. The 'of course' was their own sense words (which draw fire, as being simplistic). But, I value that, since it offers a parallel to some of the work in Logos (and extends beyond BH, as Steve notes).

The other one I wanted, but isn't real easy to use ... the frequency table. It's comparing MT, Ben Sira, DDS, and inscriptions. Obviously, one has to recognize filtering (edits over time, fragments, and archaeology success). But interesting. They don't percent it in either direction, so I'll need to export at times.


Posts 2465
Lee | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 12 2019 12:02 AM

Denise:

Obviously, one has to recognize filtering (edits over time, fragments, and archaeology success). But interesting. They don't percent it in either direction, so I'll need to export at times.

Beggars can't be choosers. I'm still waiting for that all-encompassing, all-diachronic tome on Early/Late/Rabbinic Hebrew.

Posts 1231
HJ. van der Wal | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 12 2019 3:48 AM

Lee:

Kyle G. Anderson:

We're putting out an update today that allows you to navigate via English headword.

Expectations exceeded. Cool

Thanks, Kyle!

Posts 9969
Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 12 2019 4:53 AM

Lee:

Denise:

Obviously, one has to recognize filtering (edits over time, fragments, and archaeology success). But interesting. They don't percent it in either direction, so I'll need to export at times.

Beggars can't be choosers. I'm still waiting for that all-encompassing, all-diachronic tome on Early/Late/Rabbinic Hebrew.

Good luck on that ... 


Posts 1544
John Kight | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 12 2019 5:32 AM

Steve Maling:
Hello, John, This is how the "Introduction" of the DCH answers your good question.

Thanks Steve! This was super helpful. 

-John

For book reviews and more visit sojotheo.com 

Posts 578
Steve Maling | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 12 2019 7:50 AM

Greetings around this circle,

I neglected to enclose the cut/paste from the "Introduction" to the DCH in my reply to John. The source is footnoted, but, sadly, I didn't stop to add quotation marks were necessary.

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