SUGGESTION: Brill's "Themes in Biblical Narrative" series

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David Paul | Forum Activity | Posted: Sat, Jun 22 2019 3:03 PM

This is a high-quality series that includes many prophetically rich subjects. FL should get these for Logos, but as always when dealing with Brill and their nose-bleed prices, they need to emphasize the Bloomsbury approach of slashing prices in order to broaden their market and their reach. I have purchased one or two used hard copies from this series, but having Logos versions makes their utility much greater.

It just so happens that I found one resource from this series that is providing a great deal of on-point material related to the topic of this thread.

Obviously, the pricing MUST come down. I have no idea why anyone would want to have the fruit of months and years of research and laborious composition published by a publisher like Brill...it's quite a lot like sending your children into isolation and exile, never to be heard from again.

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Hamilton Ramos | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 20 2019 10:29 AM

Thanks for sharing David Paul.

Pardon my curiosity.  What in your opinion are some of the best resources that deal with themes (Biblical and theological)?

2. Do you have an specific workflow to work with themes? (e.g. write them down as you read the Bible, etc.)

3. How do you manage information on a theme from different resources? (e.g.  designated L8 note? or docx document to turn into PB? or mind map?

Zettlekasten notes?

Thanks ahead of time for sharing with us your particular system and experience.

Posts 1699
Robert M. Warren | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 20 2019 4:15 PM

David Paul:
Obviously, the pricing MUST come down. I have no idea why anyone would want to have the fruit of months and years of research and laborious composition published by a publisher like Brill...it's quite a lot like sending your children into isolation and exile, never to be heard from again.

Two contrasting possibilities:

  1. NewThink:  Brill, wherever they are located, might be staffed by persons who never had an adequate education in economics and rudimentary financial principles relating to rate and volume. At least in the US, a large part of the population is stone-ignorant of how markets work (and vote accordingly).
  2. OldThinkMy understanding is that Brill is among publishers who have many libraries in their customer base, and that drives their production of heavy-weight paged, case-bound volumes that could survive a nuclear war. By their nature, these books are expensive, but the publisher is having difficulties adapting their business model and pricing strategy to the newfangled world of electronic publishing. It is probably causing them to hemorrhage profits in the form of invisible opportunity costs. It reminds me of the mid-eighties, when I sought to purchase (on behalf of my employer) an IBM PC. The IBM dealer wanted to establish an elaborate relationship between my employer (a very small business) and the dealer's sales organization. I simply wanted to buy a PC, but they had the 'IBM-way'. The long term PC business didn't work out well for IBM.

Win 10 Android 8.1 Fire OS 5

Posts 4761
David Paul | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 31 2019 1:28 AM

I'm not sure my system is the most effective (in terms of handling thematically gathered material), and it certainly isn't one that most people will be able to emulate. The main reason is because I use L3 for all of my "note-taking", though I have come to wish the Notes function in L3 had been called "presentation inserts" or the like...because that's what I use L3 Notes for: presenting material within my Bible that is located in the very place where any curated information is likely to be useful and instructive. I can't say if L8 has improved in this regard, since I don't own it, but none of the previous versions from 4 to 7 allow for the same use cases I employ w/ L3. Libronix Note pop-ups can be manipulated to fill the entire screen as opposed to the tiny keyhole windows that the "newer/better" versions foist upon users.

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