Encyclopedia of Ancient Greek Language and Linguistics

Page 2 of 2 (34 items) < Previous 1 2
This post has 33 Replies | 1 Follower

Posts 688
Dale E Heath | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Sep 13 2019 8:39 PM

I can't find any active links, it's just an image.

Posts 1428
Forum MVP
Veli Voipio | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Sep 13 2019 11:56 PM

I feel there is a major problem in the "Table of Contents Ordered by Thematic Category"

No links there. Hmm

**********

The word "umlaut" appears a few times instead of "unus" or something like that.

In some places "umlaut" is the correct word, thus the fixing should be done by someone who actually knows.

Gold package, and original language material and ancient text material, SIL and UBS books, discourse Hebrew OT and Greek NT. PC with Windows 8.1

Posts 10214
Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Sep 14 2019 6:05 AM

Dale E Heath:

I can't find any active links, it's just an image.

True ... I usually don't do active links from an app into the web (if that's what you're referring to).


Posts 10214
Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Sep 14 2019 6:09 AM

Veli Voipio:

I feel there is a major problem in the "Table of Contents Ordered by Thematic Category"

No links there. Hmm

Certainly would be convenient. I guess their tagging rules are strict. One TOC.


Posts 688
Dale E Heath | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Sep 14 2019 12:07 PM

Additionally, Jesus' statement, "Surely you will quote this
proverb to me: 'Physician heal yourself (f1avnu~ EpEtTE flOt T~v napa~oA~v TaUTfJV·
'IaTpE, 8EpanEuaov amuTov)" (Luke 4:23), may also suggest that he had some
acquaintance with both Jewish and Greek literature.

This proverb is found in Greek literature, "A physician for others, but himself teeming with sores"
(Euripides [480-406 BCE], Incertarum Fabularum Fragmenta 1086), as well as in Jewish literature,
"Physician, physician heal thine own limp!" (Genesis Rabbah 23:4). Nolland, "Physician," 193-209, shows
surviving parallels of this proverb in classical and rabbinic literature.

Yes, thanks. And my son is doing well.

Posts 688
Dale E Heath | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Sep 14 2019 12:33 PM

Any thoughts on this title? "Linguistics and the Bible: Retrospects and Prospects"

https://www.logos.com/product/184135/mcmaster-new-testament-studies-series

Posts 10214
Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Sep 14 2019 1:33 PM

Dale E Heath:

Any thoughts on this title? "Linguistics and the Bible: Retrospects and Prospects"

https://www.logos.com/product/184135/mcmaster-new-testament-studies-series

Hopefully MJ or Veli or Ben will see this. 

I don't recommend my opinion. I tend to see linguistics and any of the related areas as expansive (increasing the possibles, not confirming the more narrow). Which runs contra more traditional views of the Bible, and no desire to offend. A quick read of the samples suggest the authors trying to hold on to the traditions, while integrating portions of modern language theory. Many Logosians, however, like Porter et al.


Posts 1428
Forum MVP
Veli Voipio | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Sep 14 2019 1:49 PM

Denise:
I don't recommend my opinion.

I probably agree. I am a student, not an expert.

Greek is a very interesting language, but I think I'll invest mostly into Hebrew from now on.

Gold package, and original language material and ancient text material, SIL and UBS books, discourse Hebrew OT and Greek NT. PC with Windows 8.1

Posts 10214
Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Sep 14 2019 2:12 PM

Veli Voipio:

Greek is a very interesting language, but I think I'll invest mostly into Hebrew from now on.

This volume remains $$ painful, so if you find it a lot cheaper. But it's really a fascinating study in language transmission.  One of his points is that Ugarit is so close to hebrew, but is VERY limited in sampling. Akkadian is more distant, but has a very large corpus to compare.  What is interesting, is the crossover is often not etymological, but idiomatic. That is really fascinating.  I feel geeky reading it, but it's fun.

https://www.amazon.com/Akkadian-Companion-Etymological-Idiomatic-Equivalence/dp/1602801142 

or

https://www.amazon.com/Companion-Etymological-Idiomatic-Equivalence-Supplement/dp/1602801207 


Posts 1428
Forum MVP
Veli Voipio | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Sep 14 2019 2:25 PM

I have that book in my wish list. I just wonder whether Logos would be willing to publish it 

Gold package, and original language material and ancient text material, SIL and UBS books, discourse Hebrew OT and Greek NT. PC with Windows 8.1

Posts 263
Puddin’ | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Sep 14 2019 11:49 PM

Not to hijack this thread, but I have been considering purchasing Logos’s Discourse Analyses of both OT Hebrew & NT Greek.  I find this concept very interesting and seemingly more practical than much exegetical works that I own.  Con Campbell writes about this burgeoning field in his work on Advances in NT Greek.

Having had a year of Greek and a year of Hebrew (which was wayyyy harder for me than Greek was due to the vowel pointings) I am wanting to put this into action while continuing my original language studies.

Denise—I noted your reference to Ugaritic.  I am considering taking a course in that next through Zondervan’s Master Lectures.  I see references all the time to Ugaritic in Hebrew lexicons and grammars.  But, I am not sure how much practical advantage it would make on my Bible studies (?).  You seem to know a fair amount about this so I just thought I would broach the subject.

Thanks much in advance (perhaps I should start another thread on the topic of Discourse Analysis if there’s interest).

Posts 10214
Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Sep 15 2019 6:23 AM

Puddin’:
I am not sure how much practical advantage it would make on my Bible studies (?).  You seem to know a fair amount about this so I just thought I would broach the subject.

Ugarit offers two advantages. One is how did they look at things. Absent some inscriptions and leftover buildings, there's not much to use to 'position' "Canaan" and the "Canaanites". City-states, threats, gods to protect, and how religion worked (so also Egyptian and Assyrian). For this, Logos has a nice choice of Ugarit discussions. One aspect I like, is the Phoenician angle (trading) and the problem of helping other allies (similar to Judah/Israel's constant problem).

Language-wise, the problem is much more involved. Certainly Ugarit is interesting, and Logos has some grammars to get your feet wet. But you really need to know hebrew, to appreciate the similarities to Ugarit. Dahood did 3 volumes (Ras Shamra parallels) that match up Ugarit to the OT. Quite often, he stretches, but it's a practical view ... can link to your Bible.

But if you enjoy courses, I'm sure your idea will be valuable to you. Just digging in, is all it takes, to learn an involved area.

Discourse-wise, good luck. The greek, it makes sense. They had an awareness to structuring their meanings, which added more value. Hebrew seems more a modern attempt ... you barely know the word meanings, much less implied intent. And the Logos version looks  automated, each time I've checked. Unimpressed. Emphasis Bible is more practical.


Posts 263
Puddin’ | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Sep 16 2019 12:52 AM

Denise:

Puddin’:
I am not sure how much practical advantage it would make on my Bible studies (?).  You seem to know a fair amount about this so I just thought I would broach the subject.

Ugarit offers two advantages. One is how did they look at things. Absent some inscriptions and leftover buildings, there's not much to use to 'position' "Canaan" and the "Canaanites". City-states, threats, gods to protect, and how religion worked (so also Egyptian and Assyrian). For this, Logos has a nice choice of Ugarit discussions. One aspect I like, is the Phoenician angle (trading) and the problem of helping other allies (similar to Judah/Israel's constant problem).

Language-wise, the problem is much more involved. Certainly Ugarit is interesting, and Logos has some grammars to get your feet wet. But you really need to know hebrew, to appreciate the similarities to Ugarit. Dahood did 3 volumes (Ras Shamra parallels) that match up Ugarit to the OT. Quite often, he stretches, but it's a practical view ... can link to your Bible.

But if you enjoy courses, I'm sure your idea will be valuable to you. Just digging in, is all it takes, to learn an involved area.

Discourse-wise, good luck. The greek, it makes sense. They had an awareness to structuring their meanings, which added more value. Hebrew seems more a modern attempt ... you barely know the word meanings, much less implied intent. And the Logos version looks  automated, each time I've checked. Unimpressed. Emphasis Bible is more practical.

Got it.  The Ras Shamra parallels sound interesting.  Will check into them and the Emphasis Bible.  I think that Ugaritic is only one semester since we’re pretty limited in resources.  Planning to eventually take all of the Semitic courses.

Thanks much👍.

Posts 26750
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Sep 16 2019 1:06 AM

Dale E Heath:

Any thoughts on this title? "Linguistics and the Bible: Retrospects and Prospects"

https://www.logos.com/product/184135/mcmaster-new-testament-studies-series

I am familiar with Porter but not this work. I like what I've seen of Porter in that he seems genuinely interested in expanding knowledge rather than simply proving that the latest theory can be mapped to the text (even when it produces no improvement in understanding). Beyond that, I fear you'll have to rely on one of the others with some linguistic background.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Page 2 of 2 (34 items) < Previous 1 2 | RSS