Logos 9 Wishlist

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This post has 559 Replies | 33 Followers

Posts 60
Tom Vidal | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, May 18 2020 10:08 AM

Lots of good discussions on the Personal Book issue and PDFs. I think I could live without being able to import PDFs and even live without personal books if the clippings tool could be improved to allow you to clip outside resources. And, if you could tag clippings so they would appear in Topic guides, the Factbook, etc. that would address my needs.

Posts 8197
LogosEmployee

Lee Gordon:
Does anyone have a link to that article again, where they basically said they're never going to do PDF's?

Here, maybe? https://logos.uservoice.com/forums/42823-logos-bible-software-7/suggestions/1096505-pdf-docx-files

(I actually posted that response; Adam took over the UserVoice account and it now ascribes all my replies to him.)

Posts 34
Pastor Don Carpenter | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, May 19 2020 8:37 AM

YES!!!

Posts 711
Jerry Bush | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, May 19 2020 11:39 AM

Similar to the way we can hide books we don't need, I would like to hide tools and guides and possibly other things from the menus.

I realize Logos cannot actually remove these features from the software, but as the program has grown over the years, the menus have grown and there are some features I will never use.

If I were able to hide them, I would be able to find what I actually do want to use much more quickly.

iMac (2019 model), 3Ghz 6 Core Intel i5, 16gb Ram, Radeon Pro Graphics. 500GB SSD.

Posts 799
LogosEmployee
Sean Boisen | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, May 19 2020 11:53 AM

Jerry Bush:

Similar to the way we can hide books we don't need, I would like to hide tools and guides and possibly other things from the menus.

I realize Logos cannot actually remove these features from the software, but as the program has grown over the years, the menus have grown and there are some features I will never use.

If I were able to hide them, I would be able to find what I actually do want to use much more quickly.

Both the Guides and Tools menus have a context (right-click) menu, and you can pin items you use frequently to the top. For me, that effectively keeps the others out of the way. 

Posts 1975
David Thomas | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, May 19 2020 12:42 PM

@Sean Boisen, nice tip of saving the shortcuts to scaling! when I open logos on my 12" Surface Pro and when I open on my 4k 32" monitor I need a convenient way to change scaling.

Making Disciples!  Logos Ecosystem = Logos8 on Microsoft Surface Pro 4 (Win10), Android app on tablet, FSB on iPhone, [deprecated] Windows App, Proclaim, Faithlife.com, FaithlifeTV via Connect subscription.

Posts 799
LogosEmployee
Sean Boisen | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, May 19 2020 12:51 PM

(for those not reading between the lines quite as carefully as David ...)
If you want a shortcut to change the scaling of Logos:

  • type in the Command Bar "Set program scaling to 150%" (or whatever value you prefer)
  • Don't hit return: instead, click and drag the entry on the drop-down menu over to the shortcuts area
  • By default it will probably have a gear icon: right click on the icon in the shortcuts area to choose a different icon if you like, and add a label (mine are labeled as 100% and 150%)
  • I did this twice so i had one to increase it, and one to reset it 

See the red box below for the result. 

Posts 87
Lee Gordon | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, May 19 2020 7:59 PM

Sean Boisen:

(for those not reading between the lines quite as carefully as David ...)
If you want a shortcut to change the scaling of Logos:

  • type in the Command Bar "Set program scaling to 150%" (or whatever value you prefer)
  • Don't hit return: instead, click and drag the entry on the drop-down menu over to the shortcuts area
  • By default it will probably have a gear icon: right click on the icon in the shortcuts area to choose a different icon if you like, and add a label (mine are labeled as 100% and 150%)
  • I did this twice so i had one to increase it, and one to reset it 

See the red box below for the result. 

Cool. Thanks.

Posts 501
John Duffy | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, May 20 2020 4:19 AM

One feature that would be good in Logos 9 would be the ability to assign which pane or floating window in a saved layout that new resources would open to. I generally have several floating windows open, but every time a new resource opens (unless I drag it to a specific tab location to view it) it opens in the most obscure and unhelpful window/pane. Sometimes I can't even see where it has opened if it opens in a small pane without me noticing. I generally need to drag it (or open in a separate window and then drag it) to a useful location before using it. Also, often where there are multiple floating windows open and the relevant one is hidden behind other windows, the resource can't be dragged to the desired tab location because it isn't visible. 

If panes or floating windows in a layout could be denoted according to preferred resource type (or multiple resource types) for that pane/window, that would be a great help. 

For example, if commentaries defaulted to open in the floating window preferred for 'Commentaries', or if searches and Notes opened in the floating window preferred for 'Searches' and 'Notes' and 'Clippings', or lexicons in the 'Lexicons' floating window, journals in 'Journals' floating window, and so on, that would be very helpful. 

Posts 87
Lee Gordon | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, May 20 2020 8:01 AM

Make a dedicated shortcut for selecting a Bible passage, that overrides every other window you have open. One thing I like about e-sword, is that no matter how many windows you have open, CTRL+L will always take you to the Bible reference box for verse input. On Logos, I have to keep manually selecting the Bible tab every time I want to use CTRL+G. Since all the other windows are generally synced to the Bible, it makes sense to have a dedicated shortcut that will always work only on the Bible. If there's already some way to do this, maybe someone could point that out to me.

Also, please get rid of the slider bar verse selector on the mobile, and replace it with chapter up, chapter down arrows. There's no way to select a passage accurately with that slider, and it just takes up valuable space. When you read through a passage, then you want to flip to the commentary that's synced, it takes you to the end of the comments, and you have to scroll to get back to the beginning of the chapter. It's the same when you switch from one synced commentary to the next. It's such a frustrating and needless waste of time, to have to either keep scrolling all the time, or else go in and manually select the start of the chapter again.

Thanks for your consideration.

Posts 87
Lee Gordon | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, May 20 2020 8:12 AM

John Duffy:

One feature that would be good in Logos 9 would be the ability to assign which pane or floating window in a saved layout that new resources would open to...

Yes. The "Send hyperlinks here" option kind of does that if you're clicking to open a Bible verse, but it would be nice to be able to assign where resources of certain types open.

Posts 70
Robert Kelbe | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, May 20 2020 11:05 AM

I have a few minor changes I'd like to see in addition to what I and others have already mentioned:

If you navigate to a chapter in a Bible by typing in input box or by navigating with the sidebar table of contents, the "Add Note" button should format the verse reference as a whole chapter ("Genesis 1") rather than as a verse range ("Genesis 1:1-31"). This would be consistent with the behavior you get when you navigate to a book of the Bible and added a note. The verse reference is simply "Genesis" not "Genesis 1-50".

I love the highlight styles with underlines, bars in the margin, and images like a star, question mark, or exclamation point. It would be nice if there was an option for these highlight styles to not displace the text. Currently, when you add an underline, the line spacing increases, or the margin width increases. I like this - however, if there was an option to underline without adjusting line spacing, that would be nice too because it would preserve the text as is, and the line spacing would be uniform, etc. 

Also, with highlighting styles, it would be nice if a highlight bar in the margin could be continuous across paragraph breaks.

Finally, a "bounding box" highlighting style which bounded a block of text along its circumference would be nice. Currently the "box" style boxes each line individually.

It would be nice if the Highlight tool was variable width. It is much too wide. I know you can drag it and make it a normal pane, but then sometimes hyperlinks are opened in that pane. 

Notes and Sermon Editor should keep the cursor visible. Right now its possible to type off the page, and no longer see where you're typing!

The sermon editor outline gets messed up if you have a non-outline portion of text within an outline (such as a bible verse). The outline level repeats, rather than incrementing properly.

Sermon editor has issues when backspacing or deleting a blank line before a heading. It always removes the heading formatting and converts it into the formatting of whatever you were deleting.

Copy pasting from Notes into Sermon editor removes outlines.

Clippings are not formatted the way they were in the resource. Also, why is the text editable? I always drag a new clipping into another clipping and it just pastes the text in the middle of the text of the old clipping.

It would be really nice if you could figure out how to have running footnotes - i.e., display footnotes, but allow scrolling at the same time (rather than requiring page turn view). Just like a book, the division between the text and the footnotes would dynamically adjust as you scrolled, depending on how many footnotes there were.

It would be nice if there was some indication as to which note icon corresponds to the note that you're editing.

I am always corrected when I say something is not possible with a search, but I think its currently not possible to search WITHIN X VERSES.  I wanted to find verses in Ezekiel where a verse with "the word of the LORD" immediately preceded a verse with "Son of Man". I believe WITHIN X WORDS only applies to a single verse, so that did not help. 

Other people have mentioned the idea of collapsible panes.

Workflows should remember location. Every time I click on another tab and then reactivate the workflow it goes back to the top!

Workflow "confessional documents" footnote popup doesn't show the footnote contents. Test it out - it seems like a bug.

It would be nice to be able to reorder anchors in notes with multiple anchors.

I'm not sure about whether this is a good idea or not, but sometimes I want the option to have a different highlight style for each anchor. For example, if I highlight in a book but reference a Bible verse, I want the highlight for the Bible verse to be different than the book. But I can see how that might be making things too complicated.

It would be nice if you could drag a hyperlink or resource over an existing tab to replace that specific tab. (If you dragged to the left of a tab, it would insert left as before, but if you dragged it to the center of a tab, it would replace that tab).

As others have mentioned, we need to be able to highlight and make notes in a footnote! It's part of the text...

Still loving Logos! Can't wait to see the improvements!

Posts 209
Steven Yu | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, May 20 2020 5:40 PM

One thing I would like to see also is to allow user to define printing layout based on more than one resource,  For example, users can generate Study Bible like format by having the Scripture Text on the top and commentaries below, this is very useful when leading a bible study.

"And you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free", John 8:32.
"你們必定認識真理,真理必定使你們自由", 約翰福音 8:3.

Posts 510
Nick Steffen | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, May 22 2020 12:44 PM

I would really like to see the reading plan functionality made more robust. Specifically, I would like it be made able to handle other kinds of indexes.

For example, I would like to be able to read through the Rule of Saint Benedict. The traditional way of scheduling the daily reading of the text can be seen freely online here. The current functionality either focuses on page references for non-Biblical references or you can make manual selections (e.g. through clippings or highlighting), which ignores the fact that in Logos the Rule of Saint Benedict is already indexed. 

Posts 101
Donnie Vick | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, May 23 2020 7:37 AM

I wish I could make a new notebook from the "set notebook" dropdown menu. 

Posts 501
John Duffy | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, May 23 2020 8:24 AM

Donnie Vick:
I wish I could make a new notebook from the "set notebook" dropdown menu. 

Yes, I've often thought that too. Good idea.

Also, the option to choose from notebooks instead of the most recently used ones, from the right-click menu popup. 

Posts 60
Tom Vidal | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, May 23 2020 9:07 AM

On mobile, it would be nice if we could make and use L4 links. I have lots of cross references in my notes to other notes, but I can’t follow those cross-refs on mobile. 

Posts 2959
Tes | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, May 26 2020 6:34 AM

I wish to see Geʽe z in Logos 9  be integrated. It contains Tigrinya (Eritrean),Tigre (Eritrean ) Amharic (Ethiopian), Not only the Evangelical the Orthodox, Catholic domination as well. The language is one of the oldest languages which could have a great interest for  many who would like to know more about  it. 

ETHIOPIC

The study of the Semitic Ethiopic dialects has become an important discipline in the Near Eastern field. As W. Leslau (1959) has noted, these dialects can be divided into two groups: North Ethiopic (abbreviated hereafter NE) and South Ethiopic (abbreviated hereafter SE). NE includes Geez, which is the oldest dialect, and two modern dialects, Tigré and Tigrinya. SE comprises Amharic, Argobba, Harari, Gafat, and Guragé. Guragé is a dialect cluster, and for typological reasons this cluster has been called “Gunnān-Guragé” by R. Hetzron (1977). All the Ethiopic dialects exhibit features which comparative linguists find worthy of note. A few of these features, which will be discussed below, include an important difference between the morphology of the basic verb types of NE and SE, the development of a direct object suffix in NE and SE, and the existence of a main verb marker forms in SE.

A. The Qatala and Qattala Verb Stems
Two of the basic verb types of Ethiopic have been described by T. Lambdin (1978) as follows:
G verbs—simple root + stem vowel pattern: G = Grundstamm (basic stem).
D verbs—root + doubling (D) of the second radical + stem vowel pattern.
The perfect tense of G verbs (often described by linguists as qatala) in NE is characterized by a single middle consonant, whereas in many of the SE dialects the perfect tense of G verbs has a doubled middle radical (described by linguists as qattala). The pattern of the G perfect in NE is found in other Semitic languages, but the SE pattern with a geminated middle radical is not attested elsewhere. For the purposes of comparative Semitic philology, it is important to determine whether the doubling which occurs in the SE G perfect is a Proto-Semitic phenomenon or merely a characteristic which can be explained by a development within SE itself.
This problem of gemination is depicted by the following table, which gives the G and D patterns of the perfect and imperfect tenses in Geez (a NE dialect) and Amharic (a SE dialect):

Geez (NE)
Amharic (SE)
G
D
G
D
Perfect
qatala
qattala
qattala
qattala
Imperfect
yeqattel
yeqēttel
yeqatl
yeqattel

In addition to the different NE and SE stem patterns for the G perfect, one can also see from the table that in the NE the G imperfect has a doubled middle radical (ye is a prefix), whereas in SE the same form has a single middle radical. It should be noted that in two NE dialects, Tigrinya and Tigré, the geminated middle radical of the G imperfect is simplified when subject suffixes are added. W. Leslau (1953) uses this phenomenon as one of his major arguments in favor of the secondary nature of the yeqattel form in Ethiopic. His suggestion that the form *yeqatl (u) be reconstructed as the PE G imperfect is based on his view that *yeqatl (u) can be derived from Proto-Semitic *yaqtulu and on the fact that certain SE dialects have a yeqatlu imperfect form. However, it is possible that the -u of the SE imperfect form is related to the complicated problem of main verb markers, which will be discussed below and, therefore, should not be traced back to Proto-Semitic. H. Nyberg (1932), J. Polotsky (1949), and R. Hetzron (1972), on the other hand, have suggested that the NE yeqattel form is primary and that the loss of gemination in the SE G imperfect is related to the phonetic principle underlying the loss of gemination which occurs in the G imperfect of Tigrinya and Tigré as the result of adding suffixes. According to this view, the loss of gemination, originally associated only with the addition of suffixes, spread to all forms of the G imperfect in SE. However, the phenomenon of the loss of gemination in the G imperfect as the result of adding suffixes is probably restricted to Tigrinya and Tigré and, therefore, does not shed light on the development of SE yeqatl. Thus, it is necessary to seek an explanation which would account for both the loss of gemination in the SE G imperfect and the introduction of this characteristic in the G perfect. It is likely that the D perfect of Proto-SE changed from *qattala to *qēttala, as suggested by Polotsky (1938), since this form is actually attested in some of the SE dialects. As a result of this change, ē became the stem vowel of both the D perfect and imperfect as opposed to the G stem vowel a. It was at this point that an analogy may have occurred between the perfect and imperfect form of G and D verbs, affecting the form of the G imperfect:

D
G
*qēttala: *yeqēttel
::
*qatala: *yeqatel

The result of this analogy would have been the simplification of the geminated middle consonant of the G imperfect (yeqatel). At this early stage of SE, the G and D stems for the perfect and imperfect tenses could be symbolically described as follows: G (s s) and D (d d). However, evidence from the SE dialect Endegen, as described by W. Leslau (1976), suggests that a phonological process contributed to the collapse of the contrast G (s s) / D (d d). In this dialect, the G perfect normally has a simple middle radical (qatala), but there are, nevertheless, some G perfect forms with a geminated middle consonant. These verbs appear to be historically related to verbs whose last radical was *ʾ, *ʿ, or *ḥ. These final radicals were evidently assimilated by the middle radical, resulting in the gemination of the middle radical. It is likely that a similar development occurred in the proto-stages of other SE dialects, but in these dialects, the perfect with a geminated middle radical was standardized for all root types.

B. The Direct Object Suffix
In Ethiopic, the pronominal object of a transitive verb is regularly expressed by a suffix attached directly to the verb. The forms of the direct object suffix in Geez (a NE dialect) are as follows: 1 c.s. -ni, 2 m.s. -ka, 2 f.s. -ki, 3 m.s. -o/-hu, 3 f.s. -ā/-hā, 1 c.pl. -na, 2 m.pl. -kemu, 2 f.pl. -ken, 3 m.pl. -omu/-homu, 3 f.pl. -on/-hon. Thus, in order to say, “They found me,” one would attach the suffix -ni to rakabu, resulting in the form rakabuni. In SE, some of the forms of the direct object suffix differ considerably from the forms in Geez. This divergence is due primarily to the influence of two types of copulative elements which can be described as the n copula and the t copula. The n copula of SE is historically related to the Geez introductory particle na-, which is used to prepose and emphasize a pronominal element. Examples of this inflected particle are naya and nayo, meaning “as for me” and “as for him” respectively. The t copula originated in sentences employing the third person pronoun wet as a neutralized copula, which was reduced to t because of its enclitic nature: *āna- *wet > *āna- *t, “It is I.” Both the n and t copulas were inflected for all persons and numbers. In order to see the influence of the copula on the SE direct object suffix forms, one can cite some of the attested suffixal forms in two SE dialects, Amharic and Chaha. In Amharic, the t copula was influential. For example, the original form *-ā of the 3 f.s. direct object suffix was replaced by the 3 f.s. ending -āt of the copula. The 3 m.s. direct object allomorph -t, which is used after subject suffixes ending in -u, is also related to the copula. Since there is evidence of a t copula in Old Amharic (Goldenberg 1976), it is reasonable to assume that the t of 3 f.s. -āt and the 3 m.s. t which is added to -u reflect the old t copula. In Chaha, it was the n copula which affected the forms of the direct object suffix, as can be seen from the following list: 2 m.s. -nāka, 2 f.s. -nāxi, 3 m.s. -ne, 3 f.s. -nā, 1 c.pl. -nda, 2 c.pl. -nāku, 3 c.pl. -no.

C. Main Verb Marker Forms in SE
One of the major differences between the verbal inflection of NE and SE is the introduction of main verb markers in SE. In the SE dialect Chaha, the perfect always ends in -m when it is in a positive main clause. In a subordinate or negative clause, the final -m of the perfect is omitted, as the following examples show:
(1) Main clause: naqaram, “he pulled out”;
(2) Subordinate clause: ya-naqara, “he who pulled out”;
(3) Negative clause: an-naqara, “he did not pull out.”
It is well known that the morphological distinction between main and subordinate verbs exists in the Cushitic languages, and since SE has a Cushitic substratum, it is reasonable to assume that main verb marking, as a morphological category, was borrowed by SE from Cushitic (Hetzron 1972). However, it is difficult to establish the origin of the actual forms of the main verb markers as they exist in SE. R. Hetzron (1972) has stated that some of the SE dialects used the Proto-Semitic imperfect elements *-u and *-na/-ni for main verb markers. In order to support this theory, Hetzron compares the SE dialects which have imperfect forms ending in -u with Arabic which has the imperfect form yaqtulu, pl. yaqtulūna. Such a theory would necessitate the reconstruction of *yaqtulu for Proto-Ethiopic, but since there is no trace whatever of such a form in the linguistically conservative northern dialects, including ancient Geez, and no certain evidence for such a form elsewhere in the southern languages, it seems methodologically implausible to reconstruct *yaqtulu for Proto-Ethiopic.
It is possible that the copula was one of the sources of the main verb marker forms in SE. The use of this form of the copula as a main verb marker may have originated in the cleft sentence construction. For example, in Soddo the relative verb form (i.e., ya + subordinate perfect or subordinate relative imperfect) combined with the copula (e)n is used for a simple statement in which no relative meaning is involved. The following example of this construction is taken from W. Leslau (1968):

zi addiya ba ṭobbeyā mula yaššila-n, “this river was known all over Ethiopia”; lit. “this river in Ethiopia everywhere that was known it is.”

Since this cleft sentence construction functions as a main sentence, it is possible that the copula -n which was attached to the verb was felt to be a main verb marker, and it should be noted that a final -n appears on some forms of Soddo main verbs. Another possible source for main verb markers is the form of the definite article as attached to the verb of a relative clause modifying a definite noun. The 3 f.s. and 1 c.s. perfect forms of Soddo verbs in relative clauses modifying an indefinite noun are as follows:

Definite
Indefinite
3 f.s.
yaqattalatti
yaqattalat
1 c.s.
yaqattalki
yaqattalkw

The initial ya- of the above forms is the relative pronoun. According to Leslau (1968), the final -i of the definite forms is the article. A final -i also appears on the 3 f.s. and 1 c.s. forms of the Soddo main perfect, qattalatti and qattalki, respectively. The subordinate counterparts of these forms are 3 f.s. qattalat and 1 c.s. qattalkw, which are identical to the 3 f.s. and 1 c.s. forms of the perfect in a relative clause modifying an indefinite noun.
Finally, it should be noted that the main verb marker -m, mentioned above, may be related to the emphatic particle -ma of Geez and -m of Amharic. Thus, there are several possible sources within Ethiopic for the forms of the main verb markers. It is, therefore, unnecessary to look to Proto-Semitic for the origins of these forms.

Bibliography
Dillmann, A. 1857. Grammatik der äthiopischen Sprache. Leipzig.
Goldenberg, G. 1976. A copula t in Old Amharic. IOS 6: 131–37.
Hetzron, R. 1972. Ethiopian Semitic: Studies in Classification. Manchester.
———. 1977. The Gunnän-Guragé Languages. Naples.
Lambdin, T. 1978. Introduction to Classical Ethiopic (Geʿez). Ann Arbor.
Leslau, W. 1953. The Imperfect in South-East Semitic. JAOS 73: 164–66.
———. 1959. A Preliminary Description of Argobba. Annales d’Ethiopie 3: 251–73.
———. 1968. Ethiopians Speak: Studies in Cultural Background. Vol. 3, Soddo. Berkeley.
———. 1976. The Triradicals in the Guragé Dialect of Endegen. IOS 6: 138–54.
Nyberg, H. S. 1932. Review of G. Bergsträsser, Einführung in die semitischen Sprachen. Göttingen gelehrte Anzeigen 3: 104–15.
Polotsky, J. H. 1938. Études de grammaire gouragué. Bulletin de la Société de linguistique de Paris 39: 137–75.
———. 1949. Review of Leslau’s Gafat Documents. JAOS 69: 36–41.
H. LEE PERKINS


GREEK

The Greek language has played several roles in connection with the Bible of Jews and Christians. Apart from the fact that the Greeks and their language are mentioned in it, there occur first of all some Greek loanwords in the later books of the Masoretic Text (MT). Second, Greek is the language of one of the oldest versions of the OT, the Septuagint (LXX), which was probably antedated only by the earliest Aramaic Targums. It is, furthermore, the original language of some additional books in the LXX canon not included in the MT canon. See also CANON. Finally, it is Greek in which the NT has come down to us, parts of which (Pauline letters) are undoubtedly to be seen as original compositions. As the order of these different aspects reflects the increasing importance of Greek with regard to the Jewish people, it will be appropriate to subdivide this article in accordance with it.

Blessings in Christ.

Posts 711
Jerry Bush | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, May 26 2020 6:36 AM

Thank you, Sean! I do use that feature.

iMac (2019 model), 3Ghz 6 Core Intel i5, 16gb Ram, Radeon Pro Graphics. 500GB SSD.

Posts 17
Angela Lott | Forum Activity | Replied: Yesterday 11:07 PM

This would be a fun idea: with a click of a button, Logos auto prioritizes the top commentaries recommended by bestcommentaries.com for each book of the bible in the passage guide. 

More and more people are doing mobile and web app over desktop. So it's becoming exceedingly important to have the majority of features work on one or both of these platforms.

Being able to organize your library by past upgrades or base packages. People are always wanting to know what resources came in their past packages. Why not have a fast and easy way to be able to organize this in one's library? This could also help for searching too. If people only want to search through certain denominational packages they purchased, for example.

The age-old debate: organizing resources by Christian group. Since we can search on Logos.com and narrow results by Christian group, why not within our own personal libraries if we so choose? 

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