Search For Verses Where Yahweh is Applied to Jesus

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Dan Starcevich | Forum Activity | Posted: Sun, Mar 29 2020 4:32 PM

How could I form a search that finds all the Verses in the NT where an OT text containing the term Yahweh is applied to Jesus?

Thanks for the Help!

Dan

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Into Grace | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Mar 29 2020 7:10 PM

Please keep in mind that Old Testament prophecy predicted that Jesus would not be Yahweh: 

Deuteronomy 18:15-18, Micah 5:4, Psalm 2:2,7, 45:7, 110:1. 

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JohnB | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 30 2020 2:49 AM

Into Grace:

Please keep in mind that Old Testament prophecy predicted that Jesus would not be Yahweh: 

Deuteronomy 18:15-18, Micah 5:4, Psalm 2:2,7, 45:7, 110:1

Please keep in mind that the forums are NOT for doctrinal discussion or interpretation of specific scriptures and this is teetering on the brink if not already over.

The OP was requesting a search and nothing else.

If someone is kind enough to suggest  a suitable search and it gives no results so be it.

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Graham Criddle | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 30 2020 4:00 AM

I would use the search term "<Lemma = lbs/he/יהוה> INTERSECTS <Person Jesus>"

It does give no results which indicates there is no Logos tagging where this lemma is associated with the person of Jesus.

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NB.Mick | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 30 2020 5:00 AM

Graham Criddle:

I would use the search term "<Lemma = lbs/he/יהוה> INTERSECTS <Person Jesus>"

It does give no results which indicates there is no Logos tagging where this lemma is associated with the person of Jesus.

But the OP's request would not be fulfilled, since he was asking about verses in the NT (which would have Person:Jesus tagging) where OT verses are referenced and those OT verses where speaking of Yahweh. None of those (or any other NT verse) would have a Hebrew lemma tagging. 

Basically your search giving no results only proves that the NT was not written in Hebrew. I think a more complex search is needed. I'm thinking of three overlapping circles: 

- all OT verses about Yahwe (your lemma search or equivalent)

- all OT verses cited or alluded to in the NT (this would give the link between OT and NT verse - some intertextuality dataset?)

- all NT verses about Jesus (your Person search or equivalent)

Running Logos 8 latest beta version on Win 10

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Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 30 2020 5:05 AM

Graham Criddle:
there is no Logos tagging where this lemma is associated with the person of Jesus.

Ignoring whether there'd be such an instance, from a question point of view, would creating a passage list of OT refs in the NT (all), then matched against OT YHWH tagging. This isn't the one-for-one, but narrowing down the verses to check?

Oops ... NB outlined it (I'm assuming)

"God will save his fallen angels and their broken wings He'll mend."

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Graham Criddle | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 30 2020 6:25 AM

NB.Mick:
But the OP's request would not be fulfilled, since he was asking about verses in the NT (which would have Person:Jesus tagging) where OT verses are referenced and those OT verses where speaking of Yahweh. None of those (or any other NT verse) would have a Hebrew lemma tagging. 

Apologies - I misread the question.

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Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 30 2020 7:23 AM

Dan Starcevich:
How could I form a search that finds all the Verses in the NT where an OT text containing the term Yahweh is applied to Jesus?

Alternate search idea is looking for articles/chapters about a plural unified God (so can examine scriptures cited)

([field heading,largetext] plural) WITHIN 2 WORDS God

Logos.com search idea is plurality unity that includes:

Discovering the Mystery of the Unity of God

Keep Smiling Smile

Posts 49
Dan Starcevich | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 30 2020 7:57 AM
Thanks for the help. Maybe an example will help clarify what I am doing. In Mt. 3:3 Matthew quotes Isa. 40:3. to say that John was the one referred to by Isaiah as the person crying to "prepare the way for the Lord". The "Lord" is Jesus and in Isaiah 40:3 "Lord" translates Yahweh. So Matthew is using an OT reference to Yahweh and applying it to Jesus. that is what I am looking for. In His Grace, Dan
Posts 150
Jerome Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 30 2020 10:30 AM

At 1 Peter 2:3 in my book, The New Treasury of Scripture Knowledge (a resource available in Logos), I have placed a note which lists the passages I have found where the New Testament cites the Old Testament in a manner so as to apply Jehovah to Jesus.

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Kiyah | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 30 2020 10:33 AM

Dan Starcevich:
Thanks for the help. Maybe an example will help clarify what I am doing. In Mt. 3:3 Matthew quotes Isa. 40:3. to say that John was the one referred to by Isaiah as the person crying to "prepare the way for the Lord". The "Lord" is Jesus and in Isaiah 40:3 "Lord" translates Yahweh. So Matthew is using an OT reference to Yahweh and applying it to Jesus. that is what I am looking for. In His Grace, Dan

I conducted an experiment on your example. The one problem I see is that Mat 3:3 is tagged with Person God instead of Person Jesus. You may try to use the New Testament Use of the Old Testament interactive to explore the facets, which in turn might give you some ideas on how to construct a more robust search. But overall I would agree with NB.Mick. You need to find a way to intersect passages in the NT that are about Jesus with NT passages that contain citations or allusions to OT passages. Then narrow that search to only include OT passages that contain the word YHWH. You should probably include both Person Jesus and Person God in your NT search given your Mat 3:3 example. 

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Mattillo | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 30 2020 10:41 AM

One resource I find immensely helpful for stuff like this is the Commentary on the NT use of the OT.  It doesn't answer your search question but maybe it'll be of some use to you.

3:3

A. NT Context. Once again, Matthew uses the formula “this is the thing having been spoken through … the prophet,” and, as in 2:17, he names the prophet, this time Isaiah. This introduction closely follows the model of those in Matt. 1–2, except that the actual word for “fulfillment” is lacking. Gundry (1994: 44) thinks that Matthew consciously reserves the verb “fulfill” for texts referring to Jesus. This is also the first of Matthew’s OT quotations in which he is following Mark, and the only one paralleled in Mark in which he uses such an elaborate formulaic introduction. The Greek of the quotation in Matt. 3:3 exactly matches its counterpart in Mark 1:3. Mark has a longer, composite quotation, however, incorporating elements of Mal. 3:1 as well, which Matthew will use in a later context (Matt. 11:10). John 1:23 has a shorter excerpt of Isa. 40:3, attributed directly to the Baptist, with slightly different wording that may reflect independent tradition. All three Gospels apply the text to the preaching of John the Baptist. Apparently interpreting “in the wilderness” as referring to the location in which the voice cries out, Matthew sees the fulfillment of Isaiah’s prophecy in the preaching of John in the Judean desert (3:1). His message of repentance (3:2), symbolized by the ritual of baptism (3:6) and summarized by the concepts of fleeing from God’s wrath (3:7) and of bearing fruit (3:8), corresponds to Isaiah’s call to “prepare the way of the Lord, make straight his paths” (40:3). John goes on to explain that the moral cleansing of the nation for which he calls does indeed precede the ministry of a much greater individual who will baptize with the Spirit and with fire, providing the promised salvation and judgment of the Lord (3:11–12).

B. OT Context. Isaiah 40:3 comes virtually at the very beginning of the second part of Isaiah (Isa. 40–66), in which the prophecy shifts abruptly from present judgment to future restoration after both the Assyrian and the Babylonian captivities. Motyer (1993: 300) takes a minority view that sees Isaiah speaking only of God coming to his people and not also of the exiles returning from Babylon, but Isa. 35:8–10 makes this difficult to sustain. Chapter 40 begins this part of the book with the proclamation of comfort and tender speech to Jerusalem, whose sins, God assures, have been forgiven (vv. 1–2). Isaiah 40:3 harks back to the imagery of 26:7 with its teaching about God making the ways or paths of the righteous smooth. But even the land and its topography are metaphorically changing, as 40:4 describes the leveling of the mountains, the elevation of the valleys, and the smoothing out of rugged places. Then the Lord’s glory will be revealed and all humanity will see it (40:5). Nothing in the immediate context oIsa. 40 suggests that Isaiah is referring to anyone other than Yahweh himself returning to Israel as king (Goldingay 2005: 5–7), but the references to special sons in Isa. 7–9 and to the messianic branch in Isa. 11, along with the Servant Songs yet to come (beginning in Isa. 42), do indicate God revealing himself through a specially anointed agent. The “shepherding” imagery of a text as close to ours as 40:11 also dovetails with other prophecies in which a messianic figure is likened to a shepherd (esp. Ezek. 34).

C. Use in Jewish Sources. The most significant pre-Christian Jewish uses of Isa. 40:3 appear in the Dead Sea Scrolls. The Rule of the Community declares,

And when these have become a community in Israel in compliance with these arrangements they are to be segregated from within the dwelling of the men of sin to walk to the desert in order to open there His path. As it is written: “In the desert, prepare the way of [YHWH], straighten in the steppe a roadway for our God.” This is the study of the law whIdeach he commanded through the hand of Moses, in order to act in compliance with all that has been revealed from age to age, and according to what the prophets have revealed through his holy spirit. (1QS VIII, 12–16) (All quotations from the Dead Sea Scrolls are from García Martínez and Tigchelaar 1997.)

In short, the Essenes at Qumran viewed their monastic community as the fulfillment of Isa. 40:3. This same interpretation is reflected in an allusion to this Scripture in 1QS IX, 19–20. An allusion in 1QS IV, 1–2 applies the metaphor of making straight paths to the establishment of justice, truth, and the respect for the precepts of God. An even longer explicit quotation of Isa. 40:1–5 appears in a fragment of another Qumran scroll (4Q176 1–2 I, 4–9), but not enough context has been preserved for us to know how it was used.

From a very different, Pharisaic branch of Judaism, Pss. Sol. 8:17 seems to allude to this text when it refers to the Jewish leaders’ (probably literal) grading of rough roads to Jerusalem to prepare the way for the conquering Roman general Pompey to enter the city. This part of the welcome was appropriate for a king, albeit ironic because the king was a foreign invader. Other texts, especially apocalyptic ones, allude to Isa. 40:4–5 with its topographical transformations and its expectations of seeing the Lord’s glory in the context of a coming new age (esp. 1 En. 1:6Bar. 5:7As. Mos. 10:4; see Brooke 1994: 130–31). Targum Isaiah at this point appears to change the focus from Yahweh’s coming to the people’s return (Snodgrass 1980: 27).

D. Textual Background. The MT begins, “A voice crying in the wilderness prepare the way of the Lord,” which the LXX essentially translates literally (changing only the participle to the genitive: “of one crying”). Matthew, like Mark, follows the LXX verbatim. But the parallelism within the OT verse would seem to require that “in the wilderness” modifies “prepare the way” (just as it does in the next line with “make smooth”) rather than “a voice crying,” as in the Gospels. The MT thus continues, “make smooth in the desert a highway for our God,” which the LXX renders as “make straight the paths of our God,” omitting the redundant “in the desert.” Matthew and Mark again follow the LXX verbatim, except that they change “of our God” to “his,” which scarcely alters the meaning.

E. Hermeneutic Employed. The difference between “a voice crying in the wilderness” and a call to “prepare a way in the wilderness” has often been exaggerated. Both in fact fit John the Baptist’s ministry; he (or the Synoptic writers) could easily have seen a double meaning in the position of the phrase in the Hebrew text, as rabbis often did in their exegeses. But the Hebrew also allows for such a double meaning to have been originally intended (Taylor 1997: 25–29).

Originally, Isaiah had in mind a preliminary fulfillment in the return of the Jewish exiles from distant lands to Israel. But his language already reuses “exodus” imagery, making it natural for the evangelists to reapply this imagery in the greater restoration from (spiritual) exile inaugurated by the ministry of Jesus to which John’s preaching pointed (see Childs 2001: 299). And given that no return from Babylon (or Persia or Greece or Rome) ever came anywhere close to fully ending Israel’s hard service, paying for its sins, or leveling (even metaphorically) all its rugged places, and certainly no event prior to Christ’s coming ever revealed the glory of the Lord to all humanity, it seems reasonable to suggest that Isaiah had a more distant, grander fulfillment in mind as well. Hagner (1993: 48) comments, “The words of Isaiah occur in a context of comfort and deliverance from the exile, but they also allude to Messianic fulfillment.” At the very least, that is how a group such as the one at Qumran would have taken it, so that they could apply it to themselves, demonstrating that the NT’s hermeneutic was not a novel appropriation of the text.

F. Theological Use. For Matthew and Mark, now that Jesus had come and was believed to be the Messiah, it was natural to associate his forerunner, John the Baptist, with OT prophecies referring to one who would prepare for the coming messianic age. Thus the “Lord” in this quotation is not simply Yahweh, but Jesus as God’s self-revelation. The burden of the quotation, however, is not so much christological as ethical: people must repent and show the actions befitting repentance to be able to welcome the coming king properly. Additionally, “John’s location symbolizes the coming of a new exodus, the final time of salvation, and the price a true prophet of God must be willing to pay for his or her call: total exclusion from all that society values—its comforts, status symbols and even basic necessities” (Keener 1999: 118).

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Kiyah | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 30 2020 11:04 AM

Here's a search I tried that returned your example passage. But it only looks at the book of Isaiah (the intertext searches seem to be designed to look at one source or target book of the bible at a time). But at least this might give you a starting point to play around with and comb through the list.

({Label Intertext WHERE Source~<Isaiah> AND Relationship= "Citation"} OR {Label Intertext WHERE Source~<Isaiah> AND Relationship= "Quotation"}) INTERSECTS (<Person God>,<Person Jesus>)

Posts 743
Kiyah | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 30 2020 11:20 AM

Kiyah:

Here's a search I tried that returned your example passage. But it only looks at the book of Isaiah (the intertext searches seem to be designed to look at one source or target book of the bible at a time). But at least this might give you a starting point to play around with and comb through the list.

({Label Intertext WHERE Source~<Isaiah> AND Relationship= "Citation"} OR {Label Intertext WHERE Source~<Isaiah> AND Relationship= "Quotation"}) INTERSECTS (<Person God>,<Person Jesus>)

Actually I was able to make the Source a range:

({Label Intertext WHERE Source~<Genesis-Malachi> AND Relationship= "Citation"} OR {Label Intertext WHERE Source~<Genesis-Malachi> AND Relationship= "Quotation"}) INTERSECTS (<Person God>,<Person Jesus>)

Posts 1777
Rick | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 30 2020 12:18 PM

Jerome Smith:

At 1 Peter 2:3 in my book, The New Treasury of Scripture Knowledge (a resource available in Logos), I have placed a note which lists the passages I have found where the New Testament cites the Old Testament in a manner so as to apply Jehovah to Jesus.

Jerome, 

Thanks for another great tip within your book. Your tips are helping me to learn how to use it. 

Posts 49
Dan Starcevich | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Apr 8 2020 1:07 PM

thanks,  This looks useful.  At first glance it seems as if it is returning some things beyond what I am after (e.g. Mt. 7:23) but I think it will give me a nice list that will contain what I am looking for.

Dan

Posts 4960
David Paul | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Apr 8 2020 5:25 PM

Into Grace:

Please keep in mind that Old Testament prophecy predicted that Jesus would not be Yahweh: 

Deuteronomy 18:15-18, Micah 5:4, Psalm 2:2,7, 45:7, 110:1

This is inaccurate. Not wildly inaccurate, but still inaccurate.

I really don't think these search operator kinds of queries serve Bible students very well. The best way to do this kind of study is to just look at every use of the Tetragrammaton and decide which ones fit your criterion/criteria. Why? Because you can never know if your search string is comprehensive until you have actually done to "long form" study for comparison. If you are okay with "possibly incomplete" searches, Logos searches can get you quick results. If you want exhaustive thoroughness, you have to role up your sleeves and dig in the old(er) fashioned way. Logos can still help with this, of course.

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