Two Exoduses

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Posts 28
Landon Brake | Forum Activity | Posted: Mon, Jul 20 2020 10:12 AM

I'm currently doing The Sermon on the Mount Mobile Ed by Jonathan T. Pennington. Anyway he makes this statement, "

NARRATIVE—Founding of the Church (Matt 14–17)

That leads into chapters 14–17, where Jesus performs two exoduses—water crossings and wilderness feedings—one for Jewish people, one for Gentile people. I wish I had time to explain all that. You just have to trust me on that."

Can anyone tell me what is he talking about or what sources articles or books go on the subject his is saying? I find that to be really interesting and want to know more.

Posts 269
Matt Hamrick | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jul 20 2020 10:35 AM

Ask him what he means, pretty sure he is on Faithlife. 

Posts 92
Rick Carmickle | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jul 20 2020 12:24 PM

Here is an article that will give you a sense of what he is talking about.

https://digitalcommons.pepperdine.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2224&context=leaven

Posts 28
Landon Brake | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jul 20 2020 12:47 PM

Okay I will see how to contact him. Thanks

Posts 28
Landon Brake | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jul 20 2020 12:48 PM

Awesome I will read that as soon as I can. Thank you!

Posts 2239
David Thomas | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jul 20 2020 2:14 PM

Landon Brake:

Okay I will see how to contact him. Thanks

Start with https://faithlife.com/jonathan-t-pennington/activity on the Faithlife Social Media Platform.

Making Disciples!  Logos Ecosystem = Logos8 on Microsoft Surface Pro 4 (Win10), Android app on tablet, FSB on iPhone, [deprecated] Windows App, Proclaim, Faithlife.com, FaithlifeTV via Connect subscription.

Posts 5002
David Paul | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jul 20 2020 2:21 PM

Rick Carmickle:
https://digitalcommons.pepperdine.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2224&context=leaven

What a bizarre name for a journal.

Posts 49
Bmickey | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jul 21 2020 7:58 AM

Matthew 13:33 😀

Posts 5002
David Paul | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jul 21 2020 11:56 AM

Bmickey:

People assume that "description" is a "happy" one...but it actually describes the kingdom under the sway of evil spirits.

Posts 2304
GaoLu | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jul 21 2020 12:21 PM

I both agree and disagree with points in the statement below, but find both interesting:

An excellent book: https://www.logos.com/product/2956/interpreting-the-parables

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The fact that the woman “hides” the leaven should not be over-interpreted to mean deliberate concealment of the kingdom. This is just a graphic way of picturing the mixing in of the yeast, according to common baking practice. The variation between the two parables from the man to the woman is appropriate in the culture of the day for the tasks involved and should be given no added significance, except perhaps that Luke liked to balance pairs of parables or stories about men and women (e.g., Lk 15:3–7 and 8–10; 11:5–8 and 18:1–8; or 11:30 and 31). He may be trying to appeal to as wide an audience as possible.


Although the passages do not break the bounds of realism, they at least border on the extravagant. Mustard trees do not usually grow large enough to entice many birds to nest in them, and the “three measures of flour” which the woman leavens have been variously estimated as equalling a quantity of 25–40 liters, capable of feeding over 100 people. There is no promise here that the kingdom will come in such grandeur that Jesus’ followers will dominate the earth. But it does appear that the end result will be far greater than what anyone observing Jesus and his band of disciples would have imagined. The remarkable quantity of leaven and surprising size of the mustard plant point to the second level of interpretation, but the parables do not thereby become inauthentic. And, although the number of measures of flour has provided plentiful grist for the mill of allegorizers, it almost certainly has no further significance beyond pointing to this extravagance.


A few commentators have tried to make the yeast retain its typically evil connotations as in earlier Jewish literature as well as elsewhere in Jesus’ teaching (e.g., Mk 8:15 pars.). This can be overt, as in one dispensationalist view which takes the parable to be teaching the ever-increasing growth of evil until the last days; or covert, as in the view which sees Jesus as parodying the Jewish leaders’ attitude toward the makeup of his followers—tax collectors and sinners—the scum of the earth in their eyes.88


But immediate context must always take priority over background, and the parallel parable of the mustard seed can hardly be taken in such light. The dispensationalist view, further, rests on a one-sided view of Scripture’s teaching about the influence of good and evil in the last days (avoiding the force of, e.g., Mk 13:10 pars.), whereas the approach that sees a kind of parody reads in an overly subtle form of irony not characteristic of Jesus’ teaching elsewhere. If there is a difference between the point of the mustard seed and of the leaven, it is more likely along the lines suggested by Carson: the former depicts “extensive growth” and the latter “intensive transformation.” Yet in light of the minimal role afforded to the process of growth in these parables, even this distinction seems dubious.

Craig Blomberg, Interpreting the Parables (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1990), 285–287.

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Forum MVP
Ted Hans | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jul 21 2020 1:47 PM

David Paul:
People assume that "description" is a "happy" one

Yes It isWink.

David Paul:
.but it actually describes the kingdom under the sway of evil spirits.

HmmmmSurprise

Dell, studio XPS 7100, Ram 8GB, 64 - bit Operating System, AMD Phenom(mt) IIX6 1055T Processor 2.80 GHZ

Posts 247
Colin | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jul 21 2020 4:17 PM

Landon Brake:
That leads into chapters 14–17, where Jesus performs two exoduses—water crossings and wilderness feedings—one for Jewish people, one for Gentile people.

Hi Landon, 

This thread has gone off track a little but I think I can shed a little light on your original question. There are 3 stories being referred to here: the feeding of the 5000 (Matthew 14:13-21) which is followed by the Lord Jesus walking on water (Matthew 14:22-33), and the feeding of the 4000 (Matthew 15:32-39). Pennington may possibly be referring to Matthew 15:39 as a 2nd crossing. The reason he calls these 'Exoduses' is because they evoke the stories of the people of Israel being fed with manna in the wilderness and presumably the people crossing the water to safety. 

Some scholars would call this typology, where the original historical account in the OT is repeated in a way which is heightened and intensified in the NT by the Lord Jesus. 

In terms of Jew and Gentile, the feeding of the 5000 is usually thought of as being for a Jewish group while the 4000 are sometimes thought to be Gentile because of the preceding geographical context.  

Shalom, 

Colin 

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