SUGGESTION: Fix embarrassing design flub - add biography as an Label entry

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Posted: Fri, Jan 22 2021 10:35 PM

So I am building a Personal Label highlight to compensate for the lack of reference and topic data and the first attribute is Author. So I go to set the value type to Biography ... what do I find? some idjit forgot to have it among the possible values ... despite that number of labels that need it. Please repair this simple oversight ASAP.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Bernhard | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 23 2021 2:19 AM

You might want to edit the way you phrased that...

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 23 2021 2:46 AM

Bernhard:

You might want to edit the way you phrased that...

???? I may be missing something. "idjit" as I know it from the Irish-American mystery tradition is an affectionate, exasperated term. Also used by a Chicago Irish Catholic delightful matron from a lake shore address. Not to be confused with the obsolete and offensive idiot.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Bernhard | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 23 2021 8:53 AM

I'm not a native English speaker, but it seems every dictionary I can find online says that those two words are essentially the same...

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 23 2021 11:09 AM

It is the American form of eejit 

an ‘eejit’ is an Irish/Scottish term for an idiot or a fool, but more often it’s used in an affectionate (yet still mocking!) manner. There is also an element of sympathy; eejitry is forgivable idiocy. It is often used in a self deprecating way. “I was a bit of an eejit there wasn’t I?”

It doesn’t connote mental retardation – idiot can – instead signalling foolish behaviour, be it chronic or occasional. Eejit is softer than idiot, and is not generally used hurtfully but to gently criticise someone the speaker knows and may well hold in affection.

Eejit – Another example of the many unusual Irish insults, an ‘eejit’ is an idiot or a fool, but more often it’s used in an affectionate (yet still mocking!) manner.

or from a fan site for a TV show using the term:

"Idjit" is an affectionate, but exasperated, appellation usually applied by Bobby to Sam and Dean

What I find interesting is that this is at least the third time I have used the word in the forums. At least once it was met with a request for a definition. I am often tempted to use it but refrain because it is ethnic slang. On the other hand, I have heard and used it for 50 years and this is the first time I've had a complaint. If I knew a word that was not ethnic slang that conveyed the same sense of affectionate exasperation, I would gladly use it.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 23 2021 5:22 PM

A quick apology (sort of).

"Idjit" as I have used it for 50+ years is not an inappropriate word ... Fr. Greely even used it in his mysteries. I was unaware that (a) the Irish term had been conflated with an old Western cowboy movie term of separate origin in some online dictionaries. Think "go" as a Japanese game conflated with the verb of departure "go" for terms that look the same but should not be conflated. Second, I was unaware that the term became a catch phrase in a contemporary TV series where the word is used as I understand it but has led to lazy online slang lexographers defining it as equivalent to "idiot". It is but only in the sense that manure (expensive natural fertilizer) and bullshit are equivalent. Finally, I was unaware that some find the concept of "affectionate criticism" an oxymoron. They have my sympathy - affectionate criticism is even better than constructive criticism for building skills and it provides a healthy self-deprecatory way to laugh off one's flubs.

Unfortunately, I was being terse and precise in my communication and was unaware of how it would be misconstrued. I do understand why some found it offensive and apologize as it was not my intention to offend. Now if you can suggest another term with the same sense of affectionate criticism that I can use without giving offense . . .

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Donnie Hale | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jan 25 2021 11:08 AM

MJ. Smith:
Now if you can suggest another term with the same sense of affectionate criticism that I can use without giving offense . . .

I'd go with: "mwron"

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Kiyah | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jan 25 2021 11:30 AM

MJ. Smith:

A quick apology (sort of).

"Idjit" as I have used it for 50+ years is not an inappropriate word ... Fr. Greely even used it in his mysteries. I was unaware that (a) the Irish term had been conflated with an old Western cowboy movie term of separate origin in some online dictionaries. Think "go" as a Japanese game conflated with the verb of departure "go" for terms that look the same but should not be conflated. Second, I was unaware that the term became a catch phrase in a contemporary TV series where the word is used as I understand it but has led to lazy online slang lexographers defining it as equivalent to "idiot". It is but only in the sense that manure (expensive natural fertilizer) and bullshit are equivalent. Finally, I was unaware that some find the concept of "affectionate criticism" an oxymoron. They have my sympathy - affectionate criticism is even better than constructive criticism for building skills and it provides a healthy self-deprecatory way to laugh off one's flubs.

Unfortunately, I was being terse and precise in my communication and was unaware of how it would be misconstrued. I do understand why some found it offensive and apologize as it was not my intention to offend. Now if you can suggest another term with the same sense of affectionate criticism that I can use without giving offense . . .

Irish? I thought it was just good ol' Southeastern USA. I heard it growing up and one of my aunts (from Virginia, and not at all Irish lol) says it (jokingly). You could replace it with, "someone, bless their heart, forgot to have it among the possible values..." if you wanted to be really southern and more polite. lol

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SineNomine | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jan 25 2021 8:11 PM

MJ. Smith:
Now if you can suggest another term with the same sense of affectionate criticism that I can use without giving offense . . .

I second this phrase:

Kiyah:
bless their heart

“I want you to know how the people should behave in the house of God, which is the Church of the living God, the pillar and foundation of the truth.” - 1 Timothy 3:15 (EOB:NT).

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xnman | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jan 26 2021 6:58 AM

SineNomine:

MJ. Smith:
Now if you can suggest another term with the same sense of affectionate criticism that I can use without giving offense . . .

I second this phrase:

Kiyah:
bless their heart

I third the phrase! It's kind. 

I have mucho trouble with the English language myself.  Having grew up in the Western states and then moved to East... well, I am still in the process of trying trying to talk so I don't offend people. Don't get me wrong, there is a time and place for it, but in general, every time I have used words that offend, later I wish I hadn't. 

xn = Christan  man=man

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