Getting to know all those resources...

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Posts 1674
Paul N | Forum Activity | Posted: Fri, Jul 23 2010 10:07 PM

For all the fine Logos customers who purchase a base package as their first Logos purchase, suddenly you have hundreds if not thousands of resources at your fingertips.  Has anyone come up with a way to systematically familiarize themselves with all of their resources?

So far I've printed my base package's entire resource list and I plan on opening each one as an introduction and checking it off the list.

Anyone else?

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Fred Chapman | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 23 2010 11:02 PM

I have been trying to do the same thing for a long time. My only suggestion would be to consider creating some collections (the information on this page is a good place to start http://wiki.logos.com/Collections) and then browsing your library based on types of resources (english bibles, commentary, dictionary, topical, etc.)

Have fun and don't forget to use all those wonderful resources you have.

Posts 1367
JimTowler | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 24 2010 12:25 AM

Some use MyTags or the Star Ratings as some way of keeping track.

All resource come out-of-the-box with a Star Rating of 0.

Its easy to find or sort resources by Ratings, or even make a collection based on the rating value. Ones still 0 are ones you need to review and see what it is.

So, come up with a list that works for you, e.g. your own version of something like:

  • 0 = Never been opened, read or assesed yet. I must do so in due course ... Smile
  • 1 = Strong dislike or lack of interest in reading or using (but not quite got around to hiding [delete] it yet)
  • 2 = So so ...
  • 3 = OK
  • 4 = Fav, nice, good, useful resource
  • 5 = Hard to live without, turn here first, use most days etc ...

Of course, once you start rating things, you can start making Collections to slice and dice your resources in useful ways.

Posts 2733
Bohuslav Wojnar | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 24 2010 2:38 AM

JimT:

Some use MyTags or the Star Ratings as some way of keeping track.

All resource come out-of-the-box with a Star Rating of 0.

Its easy to find or sort resources by Ratings, or even make a collection based on the rating value. Ones still 0 are ones you need to review and see what it is.

So, come up with a list that works for you, e.g. your own version of something like:

  • 0 = Never been opened, read or assesed yet. I must do so in due course ... Smile
  • 1 = Strong dislike or lack of interest in reading or using (but not quite got around to hiding [delete] it yet)
  • 2 = So so ...
  • 3 = OK
  • 4 = Fav, nice, good, useful resource
  • 5 = Hard to live without, turn here first, use most days etc ...

Of course, once you start rating things, you can start making Collections to slice and dice your resources in useful ways.

Very good system Jim. I use rating the same way as I do music in the iTunes and that is my problem. I do not use lower than 3 and most of the music I like is either 4 or 5. SO I do similar thing inevitable in Logos rating also. The only system I actually have is commentaries. My best commentary #1 is 5Star. My second best commentary (very often it is also taken from the BestCommentaries.com rating) has 4Star. Than I have a collection of BestCommenatries I use in the PG as a first list of commentaries. The second list is all (even unrated) commentaries.

I think I will start using your system of rating. It gives system to whole library. Yes

Bohuslav

Posts 1611
Allen Browne | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 24 2010 4:06 AM

To add to the suggestions so far, consider creating collections that group resources together. This will help you understand your resources by class (e.g. what Bible dictionaries you have in English.)

For help to get started creating collections, see http://wiki.logos.com/Collections

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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 24 2010 6:22 AM

Paul:
So far I've printed my base package's entire resource list and I plan on opening each one as an introduction and checking it off the list.

That's a very daunting task. My first stop is the categorisation provided on the logos.com comparison page because I can judge the resources that are important to me and ignore the rest!

However, it is also important to know what resources will be used for lookups (hyperlinks) and you can identify these by typing commands into the Library Find box:-

  • English Bibles eg. type:bible lang:English
  • Bible dictionaries eg. type:dictionary title:bible
  • Greek lexicons eg. type:dictionary title:greek
  • Hebrew-Aramaic Lexicons eg. type:dictionary title:hebrew
  • Greek Bibles eg. type:bible lang:Greek
  • Hebrew Bibles eg. type:bible lang:Hebrew
  • Commentaries (or Series) eg. type:commentary

You should Prioritize these resources, especially Bibles, so that L4 uses your favourites and not its own.

Then you could make Collections for each of these categories and refine your choice by rating (no. of stars) or tagging as explained in the wiki.

Over time you can look at other resources eg. rating:=0 and decide how important they are. You might want to hide some.

Dave
===

Windows & Android

Posts 2762
Doc B | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 24 2010 3:13 PM

I have nothing to add, but liked your list so much, I'm replying so this will appear in my 'Your Discussions' list.  :-)

My thanks to the various MVPs. Without them Logos would have died early. They were the only real help available.

Faithlife Corp. owes the MVPs free resources for life.

Posts 3765
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Friedrich | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 24 2010 3:22 PM

Check out this Mark Barnes method for creating a virtual bookshelf with all your resource covers.  You can browse the thumbnails (scaled to different sizes according to your choice) and see what strikes you.

I like Apples.  Especially Honeycrisp.

Posts 159
ELA | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jul 26 2010 4:55 AM

I was just about to call (and might even have been tempted to download during the weekend) the Bible Lessons international (Bob Utley). I did find them a bit expensive though - especially since you can download the pdf-files for free at his website.

Looking through the titles on the resource page http://www.logos.com/products/details/2186 I just wanted to check if I had anything by Bob Utley. Wow - surprise, surprise - I ALREADY HAVE THE WHOLE SERIES!

The lesson and advice is: If you have one of the larger base packages, check before you proceed to buying anything. Chance is you might already be the happy owner of the resource!

Posts 1680
Jerry M | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jul 26 2010 5:12 AM

Dan, thanks for bringing this to our attention.  I set up a virtual bookshelf and then set my laptop to slowly autoscroll.  What a nice visual!  

"For the kingdom of God does not consist in words but in power"      Wiki Table of Contents

Posts 18577
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jul 26 2010 5:41 AM

JimT:

So, come up with a list that works for you, e.g. your own version of something like:

  • 0 = Never been opened, read or assesed yet. I must do so in due course ... Smile
  • 1 = Strong dislike or lack of interest in reading or using (but not quite got around to hiding [delete] it yet)
  • 2 = So so ...
  • 3 = OK
  • 4 = Fav, nice, good, useful resource
  • 5 = Hard to live without, turn here first, use most days etc ...

Of course, once you start rating things, you can start making Collections to slice and dice your resources in useful ways.

I use a slight variation of this star rating system, an idea I got from someone else on the forums. 0 still means just purchased and haven't done anything with it yet. But because there's a need for another state which is "have reviewed and tagged this but haven't rated it yet" I use 2 for that. 1 means really no interest in reading or looking at further except to let it be found in searches if appropriate. (If I really hated something I'd hide it.) 3 means OK, might take some time to look into it further...someday. 4 means good. and 5 means the very best, a favorite.

I also do some tagging to help organize things: First, I have a set of three different tags for reading books (usually reference books wouldn't get any of these tags): TOREAD, READING, and FINISHED. Everything marked FINISHED should have a star rating for sure. Most of the books in my library don't yet have any of these tags. I don't want the "TOREAD" list to be too overwhelming. So I reserve that for books that I really intend to start reading sometime within the next few months to a year. Second, I tag things with a code for what base package or bundle they came in, which is a help in categorizing as well as a reminder to myself of how I acquired the book. I use Base: Portfolio for all the books I recently acquired when I upgraded to Portfolio, but Base:{whatever} for the ones I got in previous base packages. If it's something I bought beyond my base package (or it came entirely within the base package but is also sold separately as a bundle) I tag it with, e.g., Bundle: AYBC. I also use tags for some of the categories that I will use to make my collections, when the rule is going to be too complicated otherwise. I have tags such as Geog (for geography related resources), Biog (for biographical), etc.

Following the recommendations of some other users, I've categorized my commentaries into four categories, using tags: LangComm (language commentaries), CritComm (critical/scholarly commentaries), HomComm (homiletic/exegetical/pastoral commentaries), AppComm (application/devotional commentaries). You might use different categories, but those ones are the ones Morris Proctor recommended and he's provided a breakdown of all the commentary sets Logos offers into those categories: http://www.mpseminars.com/images/images_A3010/Commentary-Collections.pdf

Lastly, I create collections, using some basic rules and the tagging I've done. There are a bunch of suggested collection rules at the bottom of: http://wiki.logos.com/Collections

All of the above is a work in progress. It gets more refined when I have some time to work at it. It seems like a lot of work just to organize my library, but when I think of all the time I've spent rearranging books on shelves in my print-based library, it's kind of analogous. And the power of tagging and collections is that I can rearrange my library on the fly in a flash, which I cannot do on the physical shelves.

Getting familiar with the content of the books is yet another long-term task. I poke around in them, look at the Tables of Contents, read short blurbs from the back cover (on Amazon.com) and short bios of the authors if I can find them. I discover a lot about what's in them through serendipity. Whenever I do a search I look at "By Book" view as well as Ranked view, and sometimes just randomly open up a book where my search term was found and poke around in it very quickly.

Just spend time poking around. I guess that's the best overall advice I can give. Imagine you've suddenly inherited a print-based theological library, to get familiar with it. How would you set about becoming familiar with the books? Well, go and do likewise with Logos.

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Friedrich | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 29 2010 9:19 AM

Rosie--what is your differentiation between language and critical commentaries?

I like Apples.  Especially Honeycrisp.

Posts 13118
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Mark Barnes | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 29 2010 9:37 AM

In order to familiarise myself with my library, I'm entering all my resources into an online catalogue, in exactly the same way I would do if they were 'real' books. Three advantages: (1) It helps me remember them. (2) I give each of them a Dewey number and will eventually tag them. (3) I will have a combined catalogue of print and Logos books together.

It's a work in progress. I'm about two-thirds done so far: http://www.librarything.com/catalog/markbarnes/logos

Posts 258
Aaron Sauer | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 29 2010 10:22 AM

Mark Barnes:

In order to familiarise myself with my library, I'm entering all my resources into an online catalogue...

Mark, great idea. Seems like a daunting task though. Have you found an efficient way to do this?

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Mark Barnes | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 29 2010 10:48 AM

Aaron Sauer:
Mark, great idea. Seems like a daunting task though. Have you found an efficient way to do this?

Well, part of the point is that if it's too efficient, I won't remember the books I'm adding. Librarything allows you to add books by searching, and most of the time copying/pasting the title from my Logos library is sufficient to find the book. One further click then adds it to my library. You can also add by ISBN, but unlike L3, there's no easy way to get at ISBNs in L4.

The other option would be to export your data from Logos. This sort of works. You'll need to create a bibliographic CSV file using my website, then edit the CSV to conform to LibraryThing's standards, and upload it to here: http://www.librarything.com/import.php LibraryThing will do it's best to add missing data such as Series info. It ought to add a cover too, but that doesn't seem to be working at the moment.

Posts 18577
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 29 2010 2:53 PM

Mark Barnes:

In order to familiarise myself with my library, I'm entering all my resources into an online catalogue, in exactly the same way I would do if they were 'real' books. Three advantages: (1) It helps me remember them. (2) I give each of them a Dewey number and will eventually tag them. (3) I will have a combined catalogue of print and Logos books together.

It's a work in progress. I'm about two-thirds done so far: http://www.librarything.com/catalog/markbarnes/logos

Wow, Mark, that looks awesome. Are you putting in the real publication date instead of the (sometimes bogus) publication date Logos uses?

I've been using Goodreads for some time to keep track of print-based books I've read and make notes on them and share my recommendations with others. But I have made no attempt (and am not planning to) to catalogue books I own using it. It seems that the interface of LibraryThing might be better for me, though I'm loath to do this sort of work in two places, as there will be quite a bit of redundancy. Sad

Posts 18577
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 29 2010 3:08 PM

Dan DeVilder:

Rosie--what is your differentiation between language and critical commentaries?

Hi Dan, it's not my distinction, it's the one Morris Proctor and his team used in that document I cited. I puzzled over the difference for a while, but it appears that language commentaries just focus on language issues (manuscript issues, text criticical and translation decisions, with no attempt at exegesis), while critical/scholarly commentaries take into account the language issues but go further than that. Two examples of language commentaries that I have are Metzger's A Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament and the UBS Handbook series. Here's an excerpt from Metzger:

Here's an excerpt covering those same verses from the UBS Handbook on John:

 John 1.3b–4.

The last half of verse 3 presents a punctuation difficulty. It is possible to make a full stop at the end of verse 3 (so TEV, RSV, JB, Mft, Phps, NAB) or to make a full stop before the end of the verse, and so connect the last half with verse 4 (see TEV and RSV alternative renderings and NEB). The oldest Greek manuscripts have no punctuation here, and even if there were some punctuation, it would merely reflect the exegesis current when the punctuation was introduced into the text. The UBS Committee on the Greek text favors the second of the two alternatives for two reasons: (1) it represents the consensus of opinion of the ante-Nicene writers, orthodox and heretical alike; (2) this punctuation is more in keeping with what is believed to be the rhythmical pattern of the prologue. However, the same UBS Committee also suggests several good arguments in favor of following the punctuation represented by the majority of modern English translations: (1) John often begins a sentence with the preposition “in” (en), as would be the case if a full stop were placed at the end of verse 3; (2) it would be more in keeping with John’s repetitive style; (3) it reflects Johannine thought (see 5.26, 39; 6.53).

If one follows the TEV text, the second part of verse 3 is an emphatic negative statement, essentially equivalent in meaning to the first part of the verse. Such an emphatic combination of positive and negative expressions may be found in certain languages in such forms as “by means of the Word God created all things. There was not anything that he did not create without the Word” or “… He did not create anything without the Word.”

The Word was the source of life is literally “in him (the Word) was life.” The intention of this statement is not to affirm that the Word was alive, as might be suggested by a literal translation. Rather, it is to declare, as TEV makes clear, that the Word was the source of life.

JB also makes it clear that this is the meaning “(All that came to be) had life in him,” as does NEB” (All that came to be) was alive with his life,” and the GeCL “he gave life to all living beings.” Bible de Jerusalem (BJ) adds a footnote, “If the Word, the Son of the living God (6.57), is the source of eternal life for men (3.15, etc.), it is because he has life in himself (5.26) and because he himself is life (11.25; 14.6; see 1.1, etc.).”

If, however, the second part of verse 3 is combined with the beginning of verse 4, there is a logical relation between the two clauses essentially equivalent to “God did not create anything without the Word, since the Word was the source of life.” This logical relation, however, is simply implied, not specifically indicated, in the Greek text.

What is the meaning of the word life in this context? Is it a reference to natural life or to eternal life? Since life is one of the basic themes of the Gospel of John (see 20.31, where the purpose of the Gospel is stated to be “that through your faith in him you may have life”), it is probable that life here is equivalent to “eternal life.” Even though “everlastingness” is one quality of eternal life, it is not the primary emphasis in John’s Gospel. For John life (“eternal life”) describes a quality of existence, that is, the kind of life that man has when God rules in his life. The word life (Greek zoe) is used 36 times in John’s Gospel, never in the sense of “natural life” or “biological life,” but always with the meaning of “real life” or “true life.”

The concept of light is also characteristic of John’s Gospel. According to this Gospel, Jesus is not only the life (see 11.25; 14.6), but also the light of the world (8.12; 9.5). In the Old Testament the concept of light was something desirable and pleasant, as opposed to darkness. The world of the living was a world of light, while the world of the dead was a place of darkness. During the interval between the Old and New Testaments, however, the concept of light took on a new dimension. It became equated with the power of good, which was engaged in a struggle with darkness, the power of evil. This use is reflected, not only in Jewish sources of that period, but also in the religious and philosophical thought of other religions. In such contexts light becomes symbolic for the true revelation of God, and almost an equivalent term for God himself and for the salvation that he brings to men.

This life brought light to mankind is literally “this life was the light of men,” but the meaning of this genitive construction is obviously “this life was the light for men” (Mft, Zür).

If one understands life in terms of a particular quality of life, and not mere existence, there seems to be no special shift of meaning in verse 4. Otherwise, the first occurrence of life would refer to physical life, while the second occurrence would certainly indicate a quality of life which enlightens men. The really serious difficulty in translating this verse occurs in languages which do not employ a noun for life, but which use only verbs, since with such verbal expressions there must be an indication of who is living. In such instances the first part of verse 4 may be rendered “The Word was the one who caused people to really live.” The second clause may then be rendered “this way of living …” or “this way that people could truly live caused people to see” or “… to perceive.” Frequently it is not possible to speak of “bringing light to men,” since such an expression would refer only to carrying a torch. The focus here is not upon physical light but upon spiritual enlightenment, and therefore the passage may be translated “… caused people to truly perceive” or “caused people to perceive the truth,” but note the important symbolic significance of “light” in verse 5.

 

Of course there could be some overlap between the categories. UBS Handbooks might be more than just language commentaries; they do seem to make some inferences about meaning, but their main focus is on helping people in the field come up with good translations for their local context.

Hope that helps.

Posts 1680
Jerry M | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 30 2010 2:13 PM

Dan DeVilder:
Check out this Mark Barnes method for creating a virtual bookshelf with all your resource covers.  You can browse the thumbnails (scaled to different sizes according to your choice) and see what strikes you.

Or you can take several screen shots and use "paint" to make wallpaper.  Then just stare at your computer display and change the wallpaper every-so-often.               Seriously it does make a cool desktop background and I'm looking to get my post count up and pass Rosie before 4.1 goes gold.  :)

 


"For the kingdom of God does not consist in words but in power"      Wiki Table of Contents

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Mark Barnes | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 30 2010 2:57 PM

Rosie Perera:
I've been using Goodreads for some time to keep track of print-based books I've read and make notes on them and share my recommendations with others. But I have made no attempt (and am not planning to) to catalogue books I own using it. It seems that the interface of LibraryThing might be better for me, though I'm loath to do this sort of work in two places, as there will be quite a bit of redundancy.

The social aspects of LT are just as good as Goodreads, if not better in my view. Cataloguing is way better at LT, and it's real strength.

Posts 3
Mark Vanderwerf | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Aug 29 2010 5:20 AM

Hi Mark,

I'm working on putting my library into LibraryThing as well.  Would you be willing to e-mail and csv export file from LibraryThing of your Logos collection that includes the ISBN numbers? That would give me a "headstart" in importing my Logos library into Library Thing.  I can view your collection on LibraryThing, but can't export it.  My email is:   thevanderwerfs at gmail dot com

 

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