Logos Pricing

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This post has 33 Replies | 3 Followers

Posts 442
Tony Thomas | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Sep 6 2010 7:17 AM

Thanks for posting these.  It makes a lot more sense to me now with Bob's detailed explanations.

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Shawn Drewett | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Sep 6 2010 7:25 AM

You know, Dell seems to be doing great selling their stuff at Wal Mart now. Any observations on why Logos continues to sell their product exclusively?

Posts 1699
Robert M. Warren | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Sep 6 2010 9:26 AM

I think we see pricing issues more clearly if we understand that the real issue is:  How valuable is the product to you?

I had an acquaintance who had some knowledge of the paper industry and would not purchase paper towels because he "knew what the gross margin" was for those products. He didn't make his judgment based on the utility he would derive from the product.

I also think Metcalfe's Law is analogous here. It indicates that the value of a network (and its individual devices) increases with more devices by far more than can be accounted for by the utility of each individual device alone. (Computer Science folks: this is my rough paraphrase / understanding.)

I think that with Logos both your library and each individual title explode with value as you add more resources (or purchase a more complete base package).

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Kevin Becker | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Sep 6 2010 9:37 AM

Shawn Drewett:
You know, Dell seems to be doing great selling their stuff at Wal Mart now. Any observations on why Logos continues to sell their product exclusively?

Bob addressed this briefly when Logos took their products out of resellers. http://community.logos.com/forums/p/3988/31337.aspx#31337

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Matthew C Jones | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Sep 6 2010 9:42 AM

Tony Thomas:

I can certainly see paying a lot for resources as valuable as BDAG and HALOT because they get so much use. 

Abraham & Sarah have a Labor Day cookout and invite 200 people.
190 people are fine with the fatted calf bar-b-que. (BDAG/HALOT)
9 people want bar-b-que mutton. (Near Eastern Studies Collection)
1 is vegetarian and wants fried eggplant. (Barnes Notes)

The calf and sheep pay the ultimate price to satisfy the need. (Logos tagging, scanning, proofreading)
The eggplant contributes a portion of it's fruit to the chef's hands.

Is it any wonder the resources in less demand would cost so much? But to the vegetarian it is worth the extra effort the chef is required to give.

All right, I know it is convoluted thinking. I'm distracted by our church's cookout this afternoon.

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Shawn Drewett | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Sep 6 2010 10:05 AM

Yea I read that. I was wondering about the opinions of forum users.

Posts 442
Tony Thomas | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Sep 6 2010 10:46 AM

Interestingly, I bought my first Logos/Libronix product from Sam's Club many years ago.  It was the MacArthur Lifeworks Library and the price was around $25 back then.  Since that time, I have noticed that Wal Mart/Sam's Club has greatly reduced the quality and quantity of its Christian offerings.  Perhaps that indicates an erosion of interest/sales in those types of products.

I think a more interesting trend to watch in Christian publishing is the emergence of ePub format books.  You can pop over to CBD and find a lot of offerings for $10-20 (including some theological works) from companies like Zondervan, Baker and Nelson.  Of course, these do not benefit from the markup and searchability of Logos format books.  However, many of these works don't require the search ability of reference and scholarly works.

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Matthew C Jones | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Sep 6 2010 3:30 PM

Tony Thomas:
I bought my first Logos/Libronix product from Sam's Club many years ago.

That is where I bought Libronix products too. I met Sam Walton when I joined his first Sam's Club (Midwest City, OK.) He sold Bibles, not beer and was committed to building up families. A lot changed after he died.

 

 

 

<just got back from an afternoon of wonderful christian fellowship & good cooking! Stick out tongue >

 

 

 

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Posts 373
Wilson Hines | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 7 2010 7:54 AM

George Somsel:

Tony Thomas:

I already own the print version and there is no PDF version that I know of.  My reason for rebuying would be to have it in Logos format.

 

I would therefore assume that you want the Logos linking capabilites.  For that you need to pay.  Logos employees may be good people, but they don't work without compensation (as I'm sure none -- or very few -- of us do either).

 

 

Now, I am not trying to troll or cause trouble.  George, you know, just as well as most people here knows, Logos exports most of that work over seas.  Yes, there is extensive auditing and editing here stateside, but quite frankly, the most laborious of this effort is done over seas just like your blue jeans and everything else you buy.  If this isn't the senario now, it was in the past.  I seriously doubt they have varied from this practice, as it is a huge cost saver. 

Wilson Hines

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Matthew C Jones | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 7 2010 9:15 AM

Wilson Hines:
Logos exports most of that work over seas.  Yes, there is extensive auditing and editing here stateside, but quite frankly, the most laborious of this effort is done over seas just like your blue jeans and everything else you buy.  If this isn't the senario now, it was in the past.  I seriously doubt they have varied from this practice, as it is a huge cost saver. 

Although Logos is predominantly an American company by common definition, they have a multi-national presence.  The exchange of labor and brain-trust is bidirectional. I am not privy to all the financial details but it would not surprise me to find your scenario no longer applies. I do not know where the high dollar equipment  is installed but I would guess it is close to HQ.  (follow the links in this blog post: APT Bookscan 1200  http://blog.logos.com/mt-cgi/mt-search.cgi?search=page+scanner&IncludeBlogs=1&limit=20  )

Drastic changes are taking place in the world labor markets. The economies of China and India are burgeoning. There is more parity of compensation with US counterparts. Logos can not hire $200-a-day coders for $10. They never could.  (The 1970s did have disparity of 20 to 1 in the general labor pool.) If there is ever a windfall profit for Logos it is not found by exporting jobs, but by automating them. The fact the product is digital saves enormously on material cost, handling, shipping and updating. (That is where potential windfalls will  be found.)

The idea of reinvesting profits into the company in the form of new features, quality CS, and new resources seems wise to me. Geeked

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Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 7 2010 12:09 PM

Matthew C Jones:

Wilson Hines:
Logos exports most of that work over seas.  Yes, there is extensive auditing and editing here stateside, but quite frankly, the most laborious of this effort is done over seas just like your blue jeans and everything else you buy.  If this isn't the senario now, it was in the past.  I seriously doubt they have varied from this practice, as it is a huge cost saver. 

Although Logos is predominantly an American company by common definition, they have a multi-national presence.  The exchange of labor and brain-trust is bidirectional. I am not privy to all the financial details but it would not surprise me to find your scenario no longer applies. I do not know where the high dollar equipment  is installed but I would guess it is close to HQ.

I'm not sure whether they're still doing it, but the most Logos used overseas labor for was keying in text (or fixing the typos in scanned text). I'm pretty sure the tagging was all done in-house because it required specialty knowledge.

Posts 165
Wayne | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 8 2010 9:34 AM

I am in the process of giving away the remaining books of what was at one time a 800 volume library. The reason is that we are planning on moving continents and the price of freight makes it totally unpractical to take more than few volumes. If we didn't have Logos, we might have taken about a 100 volumes, now it is less than 50.

I am by nature a tight wad, but want Logos to maintain a high enough price to remain viable as a business in the future.  I like carrying a 2,000 volume library in my computer and would like to do that for the rest of my life.

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Lynden Williams | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 8 2010 9:47 AM

Wayne:
I like carrying a 2,000 volume library in my computer and would like to do that for the rest of my life.
Yes

Everything ever written in Religion and Theology formatted for Logos Bible Software.Logos Youtube Channel

Posts 442
Tony Thomas | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Sep 18 2010 1:44 PM

I definitely agree that electronics formats are preferable to paper books.  But I think I will still be using some of the bound versions until I can afford to replace them with the Logos versions since that seems to be an expensive proposition, especially if they are not included in the extant bundles.  I may also buy some of the newer ones in ePub since they are relatively cheap and quickly available. Plus, it saves trees and space. 

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