I would like to know how many languages could one speak?

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Tes | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Oct 9 2010 11:44 AM

How many languages does Logos speak? I know my question is ambiguous,but never mind I accept what ever it is.

Blessings in Christ.

Posts 3810
spitzerpl | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Oct 9 2010 11:46 AM

Tes:

How many languages does Logos speak? I know my question is ambiguous,but never mind I accept what ever it is.

Well, I can only speak for myself, but Logos speaks English, Greek, and Hebrew to me.

Posts 15805
Forum MVP
Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Oct 9 2010 2:10 PM

In Tools => Program Settings, can see 3 language choices for Logos 4: English, Spanish, and Swedish.

Keep Smiling Smile

Posts 3207
Tes | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Oct 9 2010 2:27 PM

Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :):

In Tools => Program Settings, can see 3 language choices for Logos 4: English, Spanish, and Swedish.

Keep Smiling Smile

Thank you I am satisfied with the answers let's resume the intents of the tread

Blessings in Christ.

Posts 19333
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Oct 9 2010 3:18 PM

Philip Spitzer:

Tes:

How many languages does Logos speak? I know my question is ambiguous,but never mind I accept what ever it is.

Well, I can only speak for myself, but Logos speaks English, Greek, and Hebrew to me.

Logos also has ancient resources either entirely or partially in Aramaic, Coptic, Syriac, Latin.

And it has translations of the Bible (or at least the New Testament) into many languages: French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Finnish, Thai, Korean, Chinese (Shen), Chinese (Shangti), Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Modern Greek, Hungarian, Czech, Serbian, Albanian, Maori, Esperanto, and Arabic.

Posts 1374
nicky crane | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Oct 9 2010 10:24 PM

In Logos3 I haD THE OPTION OF aLBANIAN.  Logos also offers a Russian Bible if I remember rightly  

Posts 1374
nicky crane | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Oct 9 2010 10:38 PM

Rosie Perera:

 

And it has translations of the Bible (or at least the New Testament) into many languages: French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Finnish, Thai, Korean, Chinese (Shen), Chinese (Shangti), Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Modern Greek, Hungarian, Czech, Serbian, Albanian, Maori, Esperanto, and Arabic.

Rosie, this could be an expensive post.  I now have to decide whether to fork out (only $14.95 though) for the convenience of having an Albanian Bible in Logos. Confused

(I already have it in another Bible programme)

Posts 116
Chris Thompson | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Oct 10 2010 3:48 AM

DominicM:
I dont speak English well, although its my first language

Ditto !!!

However, I am fluent in Pig Latin, and have a working knowledge of Andorian, Borg, Cardassian, Ferengi, Klingon, Romulan, Trill, and Vulcan.

Live Long and prosper Smile 

Richard DeRuiter:

Uh, guide-lines? So far nothing in this thread comes close. Does it?

 

And just so Richard can sleep better about our precious guidelines, I am requesting that Logos offer a Klingon Bible translation.

Posts 3207
Tes | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Oct 10 2010 1:31 PM

Rosie Perera:

That is amazing! My native tongue is English. I know French pretty well and have studied Russian, Greek, and Hebrew formally to varying degres but have forgotten most of what I learned. I've picked up bits and pieces of conversational Spanish, German, and Italian through travel and self study. My goal would be to bring all of those languages up to full fluency (at least in reading for the Biblical languages) and also add: Latin, Chinese (not sure which would be most useful: Mandarin or Cantonese), and Arabic. Other languages that have piqued my interest at one point or another (perhaps I've learned one word or phrase in them or appreciated the alphabet) have included Swedish, Punjabi, Armenian, Old Icelandic, Turkish, Japanese. And of course, thanks to Tes, I've taken an interest in championing Amharic for Logos, though I still know nothing about it.

According to YourDictionary.com, there are  6,800 known languages spoken in the 200 countries of the world. 2,261 have writing systems (the others are only spoken) and about 300 are represented by on-line dictionaries as of May 11, 2004. That's old data. Ethnologue indexes 7413 languages (and 41,186 if you include all the alternate names for them). Google Translate is pretty useful, though imperfect. I can usually get the gist of what is being said in the other language. I was able to understand a conversation that Bohuslav and someone else were having in Czech on the forum that way! Smile

Hi Rosie,if learning Arab is in your program,so Tigrinya will not be difficult for you to learn.

Blessings in Christ.

Posts 19333
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Oct 10 2010 2:09 PM

nicky crane:

In Logos3 I haD THE OPTION OF aLBANIAN.  Logos also offers a Russian Bible if I remember rightly  

Yes, the Russian one was in my list. Logos offers it for free, and the Finnish Bible is free too. I picked them both up because I do read some Russian, and I figured who knows, I might need the Finnish one someday and it might not be free forever. However, since I don't read Finnish, I'm sure I'll never be able to mark it with my "FINISHED" tag. LOL!

Posts 286
Dr. Charles A. Wootten | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Oct 11 2010 5:15 AM

I lived in Asmara back in the 60s while stationed with the US Navy near the Army base, so my interest in this thread peaked when I saw Tigrinya and Amharic mentioned. Isn't Ge'ez one of the Ethiopic languages, too?

{charley}

running Logos Bible Software 6.0a: Collector's Edition on HP e9220y (AMD Phenom II X4 2.60GHz 8.00GB 64-bit Win 7 Pro SP1) & iPad (mini) apps.

Posts 3207
Tes | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Oct 11 2010 5:33 AM

Dr. Charles A. Wootten:
 

I lived in Asmara back in the 60s while stationed with the US Navy near the Army base, so my interest in this thread peaked when I saw Tigrinya and Amharic mentioned. Isn't Ge'ez one of the Ethiopic languages, too?

{charley}

Precious memory! I am glad ,you have just suddenly brought me to that time picture.My high school "prince Mekonnen" was near the American radar, I could remember , the Americans army with motor cycle where passing by our school.Ge'ez is no more a language  ,no one speaks the language ,whether in Ethiopia or Eritrea ,it is only used by the Orthodox for religious perpuses. 

Blessings in Christ.

Posts 63
greypilgrim | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Oct 11 2010 1:31 PM

There is a story about EJ Young (maybe some of you WTS alum could help me with the details). Someone wrote to him about an exciting journal/book. He would send a copy to Young but it was in a very obscure North Korean dialect. Young wrote back to his friend in the North Korean dialect and asked him to send the book. Young picked up the language when he was in Korea during the war and passed through the region. He was suppose to know at least 27 languages at the time of his death. Like I said my memory may be fuzzy so I will not be insulted if I am corrected on the details

John H Pavelko

Crossroads Presbyterian Church

Walled Lake MI

Posts 8486
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Oct 11 2010 4:10 PM

Well, it depends on the "one" person speaking the languages.  I speak three "English," "Spanish," and "Spanglish" hejejehehe...see?

Posts 3207
Tes | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Oct 11 2010 4:11 PM

John Pavelko:

There is a story about EJ Young (maybe some of you WTS alum could help me with the details). Someone wrote to him about an exciting journal/book. He would send a copy to Young but it was in a very obscure North Korean dialect. Young wrote back to his friend in the North Korean dialect and asked him to send the book. Young picked up the language when he was in Korea during the war and passed through the region. He was suppose to know at least 27 languages at the time of his death. Like I said my memory may be fuzzy so I will not be insulted if I am corrected on the details

Hi John, what does it mean knowing languages? to speak flauntly or to speak just like tourist,

Blessings in Christ.

Posts 33793
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Oct 11 2010 5:22 PM

Tes:
what does it mean knowing languages?

Knowing a language means different things in different languages. One can know English without being able to read Old English - but any self-respecting Sanskritist can read Vedic. I'd claim to know Latin if I can read it but I'd expect that a priest would be able to speak it conversationally. Different people have differing levels of ability to overcome sounding like a tourist. I worked with someone educated in the US who spoke English so poorly you had to have him write what he wanted to say. But he read and understood English just fine. I think that most people who know more than a few languages probably are adapt at learning languages generally and are fairly fluent. Then you have kids like my cousin's daughter who grew up with 3 mother tongues (English, German, Croatian), learned a few more staying with an aunt working for an international hotel chain, added a couple more through required high school and college classes. She has 5 languages that she speaks without an accent and is fluent enough to translate ad copy and speak to clients in 3 more.

Not sure how this related to Logos but ...

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 1374
nicky crane | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Oct 11 2010 11:55 PM

Douglas Alvarenga:

Well, it depends on the "one" person speaking the languages.  I speak three "English," "Spanish," and "Spanglish" hejejehehe...see?

When working with a German and nglish volunteer group in East Germany in 65, when many Germans didn't know English, and most of us Brits were beginners at German, we used to speak Germish, "German when you can, English when you can't".  That way we were able to communicate about whatever we wanted and we learned German very quickly because we were using all we knew, uninhibitedly.  I also speak Saechsisch, the dialect they use in Saxony, and even some Arzgebargsch, the dialect of the Erzgebirge hill country.

 

Posts 3207
Tes | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 12 2010 3:12 AM

MJ. Smith:

Tes:
what does it mean knowing languages?

Knowing a language means different things in different languages. One can know English without being able to read Old English - but any self-respecting Sanskritist can read Vedic. I'd claim to know Latin if I can read it but I'd expect that a priest would be able to speak it conversationally. Different people have differing levels of ability to overcome sounding like a tourist. I worked with someone educated in the US who spoke English so poorly you had to have him write what he wanted to say. But he read and understood English just fine. I think that most people who know more than a few languages probably are adapt at learning languages generally and are fairly fluent. Then you have kids like my cousin's daughter who grew up with 3 mother tongues (English, German, Croatian), learned a few more staying with an aunt working for an international hotel chain, added a couple more through required high school and college classes. She has 5 languages that she speaks without an accent and is fluent enough to translate ad copy and speak to clients in 3 more.

Not sure how this related to Logos but ...

Thank you MJ.Smith ,you have explained it very well,how knowing language could be defined.

Blessings in Christ.

Posts 19333
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Oct 13 2010 10:47 AM

I came across this interesting article in Seattle Pacific University's Response magazine: "The Great Banquet of Languages."

Two paragraphs that are worth quoting here:

Studying the languages of other cultures has meant nothing less than learning to see the world through a new set of eyes and gain a fresh perspective on life. Let me offer just one small example. Frederick Buechner writes, “If you have even as much as a nodding acquaintance with a foreign language, try reading the Bible in that. … Some of it you may hear in such a new way that it is as if you had never heard it before. ‘Blessed are the meek’ is the way the English version goes, whereas in French it comes out ‘Heureux sont les débonnaires’ (Happy are the debonair). The debonair of all things! Doors fly open. Bells ring out.”

Buechner is right — I never cease to be amazed at the insights and, above all, freshness I gain by reading the Bible in one or another of the foreign languages that I have studied. I still find it delightfully evocative that the Russian Jesus speaks of the “Tsardom of Heaven,“ that the Chinese gospel of John boldly proclaims that “the Tao became flesh,” and that in the Latin version of Isaiah 34 the land of Edom is haunted by unicorns and dragons. For that matter, I can only imagine the wealth of insights I’m missing out on by not being able to read the Bible in the original languages — maybe someday I’ll have the opportunity to study ancient Hebrew and Greek.

Anonymous | | Replied: Wed, Oct 13 2010 11:35 AM

Dominick Sela:

Actually I was a little unfair to myself. I know quite a few languages other than English - Assembler (multiple versions), FORTRAN, C, C++, C#, Basic, LISP, SNOBOL, PERL, Pascal......I may have forgotten some that I know....   :-)

They're all Geek to me.

My name is Adam. I work at Faithlife with the software teams responsible for the Logos desktop and web apps.

Message me on Faithlife.com >>

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