Lenski's NT Commentaries

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Posts 261
Ralph A. Abernethy III | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 16 2010 2:23 PM

I think Lenski could have used some editing -- he can belabor a point sometimes, but still find value in him.  But I guess that's just the Lutheran in me speaking.

Posts 217
Danny Baskin | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 16 2010 4:34 PM

Thanks, Giovanni. Good info. I've always appreciated D.A. Carson's work.

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Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 16 2010 6:05 PM

I am extremely fond of Lenski's Commentaries.  Maybe now and again, once in a "blue moon," he does find something that is not there; however, most of the time he stimulates the reader with his love of God's Word and his excitement in sharing the Word with the reader of his commentaries.

Also, I find his skills in the Koine Greek to be superb.

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

Posts 579
Jim VanSchoonhoven | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 16 2010 7:59 PM

I love the works of D. A. Carson, but in this case I think his comments are a little over board. Lenski for the most part is very good, and even where he is off on something in the Greek, that hardly makes him as bad as D.A. Carson says.

However the price listed I believe is not right, I would give a call to a rep about this price, it is the price it was at 2 months ago without being on sale.  I was offered the set for 50-70 dollars less than this price.  I think that price was still to high because I already have him in another format.

I would rather use some other commentaries than his but I still enjoy checking him out often and learn a great deal from him.  He is very Lutheran and I am not, but I get over that part quickly.

In Christ,

Jim VanSchoonhoven

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Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 16 2010 9:15 PM

Giovanni Baggio:

He takes the Amillennial but he calls his interpretation "Parallelism" or something like that.  I've heard others mention his weird belief on Hades or should I say his non-belief in Hades.  He says some other name I can't remember, but is some really weird idea.  Read his comments on Luke 16:19-32.

Peace to you!  And Joy in the Lord!            *smile*

           I just spent a bit of time studying Lenski's Commentary on Luke 16:19-32.  I thought it was quite an excellent presentation -- very much so.  He handled the Greek text quite well in my humble opinion.  Whatever do you mean by "some really weird idea"???  What a weird thing to say!   *smile*

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

Posts 249
Giovanni Baggio | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 16 2010 9:48 PM

Milford, 

I heard that he doesn't believe in Hades, so I just heard...Anyway, could you do me a favor? Could you please copy and paste his comments on Luke 16:19-32 and email them to me at baggio.giovanni@yahoo.com I would really like to read them to see what my friend is talking about.  Peace to you too! :-)

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Matthew C Jones | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 16 2010 10:03 PM

Giovanni Baggio:
I heard that he doesn't believe in Hades, so I just heard..

I dare not stray too far down the theological path but there are many who believe Hades was a real place that was emptied out when Christ rose from the dead. So, in effect, Hades no longer exists, if they are indeed correct.

I could embrace the above scenario much easier than William Barclay's dismissal of all things supernatural.

I had Lenski's commentaries in hardback and found him to be, well, rather Lutheran. Wink  And that does not especially bother me.

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Posts 376
Dan Sheppard | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 16 2010 10:44 PM

I own the Logos set of Lenski's Commentaries.

I am also LCMS Lutheran.  Concordia is beginning to create their collection of commentaries, which are available through Logos.  The example mentioned was amillenialism, which you would find in Revelation.

http://www.logos.com/product/5870/concordia-commentary-revelation

I like the Concordia Commentaries.  They are expertly done, great analysis on the original language as well as commentary and then also "how does this relate to me today".

In the Bible study I prepared on Matthew, I used Concordia and I also used Lenski.  I have come to rely on Lenski and would not hesitate to recommend the set to you.

 

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Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jan 5 2011 7:54 AM

Giovanni Baggio:

Milford, 

I heard that he doesn't believe in Hades, so I just heard...Anyway, could you do me a favor? Could you please copy and paste his comments on Luke 16:19-32 and email them to me at xxxxxxxx I would really like to read them to see what my friend is talking about.  Peace to you too! :-)

Giovanni Baggio:

Giovanni!  Peace and Joy to you!  And a Blessed New Year.

            My sincere apologies that somehow I missed your post to me and your request for Lenski's Luke 16.  Am attaching it to this post in Word format and hope you can open it.  I think it will dispel some of your concers about Lenski and Hades!  *smile*

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

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Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jan 5 2011 7:57 AM

Giovanni!  *smile*

Kindest personal greetings...

Just noticed that the attachment is right under your name in the post -

8737 Lenski - Luke 16 19-32

Hope this is helpful to you!  Lenski is appreciated by me...    As is Carson and a few others!  *smile*

For me it's not ====   either or         ==========          but      ======    both and ======

I truly relish my Logos Resources!

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

Posts 1646
SteveF | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jan 5 2011 10:36 AM

To my "brother" and fellow Canadian, Milford:

Now that you have connected to Giovanni, could you edit your earlier post to take out his email address?

There are "bot" machines out there that "harvest" these so they can distribute spam.

Peace

Regards, SteveF

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Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jan 5 2011 2:23 PM

SteveF:

To my "brother" and fellow Canadian, Milford:

Now that you have connected to Giovanni, could you edit your earlier post to take out his email address?

There are "bot" machines out there that "harvest" these so they can distribute spam.

Peace

Yes, Good Brother!  Yes!            Should have thought of that myself!  Thank you for sharing.

Blessings and Peace to you in the New Year, Steve!  *smile*

             That gigantic snow storm with the army and helicopter rescue must have been just north of you.  Sounded dreadful on the news!

Weather is relatively peaceful here in Oshawa.  Lake Ontario keeps us a bit warmer than a few miles north of here!

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 6 2011 2:09 AM

Matthew C Jones:
him to be, well, rather Lutheran.

As I was taught Lutherans for Bible study, Anglicans for liturgy and Catholics for theologyBig Smile but I fear I'm moving to the Orthodox for liturgy, and Jewish for Bible Study (Tanakh, of course) ... I hope that's safeWink

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Matthew C Jones | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 11 2011 8:22 AM

Matthew C Jones:
I had Lenski's commentaries in hardback and found him to be, well, rather Lutheran. Wink  And that does not especially bother me.

(Here I go again, talking to myself in a forum thread. Smile

Hey Matthew, You can now add  Lenski's Commentary on the New Testament (LCNT) (12 vols.) to your library at a significant savings. I found it on my Logos 4 homepage this morning.

So I went to check out the sample pages to refresh my memory of why I have favorable feelings towards Lenski. (I have parted with a few thousand hardback volumes over the last 10 years due to lack of space and Lenski was one of the casualties.)  Imagine my surprise to find this snippet from his volume on Romans:

I find his comments on the genealogies in Matthew interesting and his observations of Paul's status as "slave" very insightful. But I have got to know: WHERE does Lenski get the idea the Apostle Paul was called both "Saul" & "Paul" from birth?     Any comments?

This set has been on my want list for a couple years. I'm glad I can save some money on it now.

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Graham Criddle | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 11 2011 9:01 AM

 

Hi Matthew

Matthew C Jones:
But I have got to know: WHERE does Lenski get the idea the Apostle Paul was called both "Saul" & "Paul" from birth?     Any comments?

It seems to be an idea that others like is fairly likely suggesting that this was common practice for Jews in the diaspora (my underlining below):

1:1 “Paul” The Greek name “Paul” meant “little.” There have been several theories about the origin of his name: (1) a nick name describing his physical height, the second century tradition that Paul was short, fat, bald, bowlegged, bushy eyebrowed and had protruding eyes is a possible physical description of Paul. This came from a second century non-canonical book from Thessalonica called Paul and Thekla ; (2) Paul’s personal spiritual evaluation, passages like I Cor. 15:9; Eph. 3:8; I Tim. 1:15, where he calls himself “the least of the saints” (probably because he persecuted the Church, Acts 9:1–2). Some have seen this sense of “leastness” as the origin of this self-chosen title. However, in a book like Galatians, where he makes a major emphasis on his independence and equality with the Jerusalem Twelve, this option is unlikely (cf. II Cor. 11:5; 12:11; 15:10); or (3) parental, most Jews of the diaspora (Jews living outside Palestine) were given two names at birth. Paul’s Hebrew name was Saul and his Greek name was Paul.

Robert James Dr. Utley, vol. Volume 8, Paul Bound, the Gospel Unbound: Letters from Prison (Colossians, Ephesians and Philemon, Then Later, Philippians), Study Guide Commentary Series, 70 (Marshall, Texas: Bible Lessons International, 1997).

We know from fifteen references in Acts 7–13 that Paul also was called Saul. Saulos was the Hellenized form of the Jewish name Šaʾul. This was the form of his name Jesus used when addressing Paul on the road to Damascus (Acts 26:14). Saul is first called Paul in Acts 13:9 when in the course of the first missionary journey he proclaimed the gospel to the Roman governor of Cyprus, a man named Sergius Paulus. Some scholars have equated this change of names with a major shift in Paul’s preaching career: his transition from a largely Jewish orientation to his new role as Apostle to the Gentiles. It is true that Paul nowhere referred to himself by his Jewish name in his letters. He did speak of the pride he once had taken in stemming from the tribe of Benjamin who had given Israel King Saul, after whom Saul of Tarsus likely was named (Phil 3:5). However, as one whose expressed missionary strategy was to become “a Jew to the Jews” that he might thereby win some to Christ, Paul may very well have continued to introduce himself as Šaʾul when working in a largely Jewish setting. It is even more likely that he carried the double name Saul Paul from birth since this was a common practice among Jews of the diaspora. Paul’s companion Silas also was called Silvanus, just as Barnabas’s nephew John carried a Roman surname, Marcus (cf. Acts 12:25).

Timothy George, vol. 30, Galatians, electronic ed., Logos Library System; The New American Commentary, 77 (Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 2001).

Graham

 

Posts 5615
Todd Phillips | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 11 2011 9:10 AM

Matthew C Jones:
WHERE does Lenski get the idea the Apostle Paul was called both "Saul" & "Paul" from birth?    

Several sources in my resources say that:

The question of the double name of “Saul” and “Paul” will require our attention hereafter, when we come in the course of our narrative to that interview with Sergius Paulus in Cyprus, coincidently with which, the appellation in the Acts of the Apostles is suddenly changed. Many opinions have been held on this subject, both by ancient and modern theologians.1 At present it will be enough to say, that, though we cannot overlook the coincidence, or believe it accidental, yet it is most probable that both names were borne by him in his childhood, that “Saul” was the name of his Hebrew home, and “Paul” that by which he was known among the Gentiles. It will be observed that “Paulus,” the name by which he is always mentioned after his departure from Cyprus, and by which he always designates himself in his Epistles, is a Roman, not a Greek, word.

Conybeare, W. J., & Howson, J. S. (1893). Vol. 1: The life and epistles of St. Paul. (New ed.) (57). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons.

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"Strongly rooted in the religious tradition of Judaism, he was also broadly receptive to Hellenistic culture and cosmopolitanism (→ Hellenism), as we see from his Hebrew-Greek double name “Saul” (Acts 9:4, 17; 22:7, etc.) and “Paul.” Contrary to traditional beliefs, this name does not derive from his call, for when Acts begins to use it with his first missionary work (13:9), it is simply indicating that he was known by this name in the Greek-speaking churches."

Fahlbusch, E., & Bromiley, G. W. (2005). Vol. 4: The encyclopedia of Christianity (100). Grand Rapids, Mich.; Leiden, Netherlands: Wm. B. Eerdmans; Brill.

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"As a Roman citizen Paul had three names — praenomen (first name), nomen gentile (family name), and cognomen (additional name) — but only his cognomen, Paullus, is known. His nomen gentile if known might give some clue to the circumstances of his family’s acquisition of the citizenship (for new citizens commonly assumed their patron’s nomen gentile). His cognomen may have been chosen because of its assonance with his Jewish name Saul — Heb. Šā˒ûl, in the NT sometimes spelled Saoul and more often Saulos, the latter form rhyming with Gk Paulos. Since he belonged to the tribe of Benjamin (Phil. 3:5) his parents may have named him Saul after the most illustrious member of that tribe in their nation’s history, Israel’s first king."

Bromiley, G. W. (1988; 2002). Vol. 3: The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised (709). Wm. B. Eerdmans.

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"1.      Name. Paul is commonly known by his Greco–Roman cognomen, Paulos, but we know from Acts that he bore the Jewish name Saul as well (Acts 7:58; 8:1, 3; 9:1, 4, etc.). He himself never mentions his Jewish name in his letters, but always identifies himself as Paul (e.g., 1 Thess 1:1; 2:18; Rom 1:1; 1 Cor 1:1, 12–13; etc.)."

Freedman, D. N. (1996). Vol. 5: The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary (187). New York: Doubleday.

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fgh | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 11 2011 5:33 PM

Graham Criddle:
"most Jews of the diaspora (Jews living outside Palestine) were given two names at birth"

This is, in fact, still the case, I believe. Thus a Jewish-American child may be called Jacob or Susannah in school, but official documents (like a ketubah or a get) will say Ya'akov or Shoshannah. And the same when someone is called to read from the Torah, or is being prayed for. When Gabby Giffords was shot, the internet quickly became abuzz with requests for and postings of her Jewish name, so that she could be mentioned in the synagogue prayers.

And the names are not always as close as Jacob and Ya'akov. I've seen examples where the two names had absolutely nothing in common, except the person who wore them both. Furthermore, the surname used in these circumstances won't be the 'civil' surname but ben/bat something: in most cases the father's name, but the mother's when he/she's being prayed for. Thus most diaspora Jews will be known under two different first names and three surnames (and maybe more still if they live in an environment that still uses Yiddish regularly).

(I just looked up a detail in this, and ironically got another thing confirmed as well: the book was dedicated to "Max Dolnansky (Mordechai ben Moshe Halevy) and Eva Dolnansky (Rivka bat David Tzvi)". Not many letters in common there...)

 

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Matthew C Jones | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 12 2011 10:47 AM

Thank you to everyone  for all the great posts here.

I'm half a century old and you would think I would have learned by now to look at the Biblical text first to see what it does say and what it does not say. For whatever reason, unbeknownst to me, I had this idea the Apostle got a name change on the road to Damascus. (I know, that is really bad hermeneutics on my part, so please forgive me. Embarrassed) I could say I made the assumption with subconscious influence from the other Biblical characters who had an imputed change of moniker:

  • Abram to Abraham
  • Sarai to Sarah
  • Jacob to Israel

Or I could try to blame it on poor scholarship of somebody else who taught me it happened thus. Devil It just goes to show we must carefully read the text and not add what is not there. I have done this same faux pas on two other passages in scripture:

  • Matthew 24  (Jerusalem 70 AD and/or the end of days)
  • Judges 11:31 (Did Jephthah sacrifice his daughter as a burnt offering?)

But to stay somewhat on topic with my Lenski question; Is there a theological significance to the Apostle being called "Saul" by Jesus on the road to Damascus and when Ananias heard from the Lord to heal him  versus "Paul" after he was called to go to the Gentiles?  (Acts 13:9 calls him both names but occurred well after he took his message to the Gentiles.)

I guess it's time to dig deeper with Logos. Geeked

 

 

 

 

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