Greek Verb

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Scott Burke | Forum Activity | Posted: Tue, Jan 18 2011 5:35 PM

I started Greek II and we will be covering the Greek verb this semester.  At present, my mind is overwhelmed with all the things we have covered just in our introduction and textbook reading.  I was wondering if anyone had any simple ways of describing mood and tense.  Do you have simple explanations for indicative, subjunctive, imperative, and optative moods?  Do you have simple explanations for aorist, imperfect, present, future, and perfect tenses?  Also, do you examples/illustrations of these that might help in comprehending them?  Thank you!

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Alan Charles Gielczyk | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jan 18 2011 6:26 PM

Simple? No.

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Kevin Becker | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jan 18 2011 6:38 PM

Scott,

Don't Panic. This topic is not simple because language is a messy complicated thing. However, you'll have plenty of time to attack these various areas as the term progresses.

If you have Heiser's Morpho-Syntactic Glossary it gives thumbnail definitions that might help you. Keep in mind that short definitions like this are not going to reflect the full reality of what the concept means for the language but they can give you a place to start understanding your lessons.

And when you think the verb is hard say to yourself "At least I haven't hit participles yet" (Devil sorry, couldn't help myself)

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Jerry M | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jan 18 2011 6:39 PM

The Pocket Dictionary for the Study of New Testament Greek can be helpful in that regard, but it is part of a collection called The Essential IVP Reference Collection.

"For the kingdom of God does not consist in words but in power"      Wiki Table of Contents

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Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jan 18 2011 7:49 PM

English lacks richness of greek verbal expression - can compare English translations with The New Testament: An Expanded Translation - recommend reading preface logosres:wuestnt;art=Preface then compare verses (sometimes Kenneth Wuest is bit verbose).  Amplified Bible and Expanded Bible also attempt to expose verbal richness.

For scripture meditation, memorizing greek worthwhile - ponder verbal usage along with word relationships - e.g. in John 1:1 consider verb tense used to express God's being.

Logos has a page with Greek Bible Tools & Texts => http://www.logos.com/greek/nt lacks Learn to Use Biblical Greek and Hebrew with Logos Bible Software => http://www.logos.com/product/5876/learn-to-use-biblical-greek-and-hebrew-with-logos-bible-software (of the 31 Greek videos, 14 focus on verbal aspects).

Logos offers paradigm charts (spelling aid) => http://www.logos.com/product/6338/greek-and-hebrew-paradigm-charts

Looking in my Logos Library found variety of resources with Greek verbal information:

The Elements of New Testament Greek has a TABLE OF VERBS => logosres:nunnelements;ref=Page.p_142 (simple explanation with spelling - lacks illustrations)

A Short Syntax of New Testament Greek has THE VERB - MOOD, TENSE, VOICE => logosres:nunnsyntax;ref=NunnSyntax.Nunn_$C2$A72,_76;off=1087 (has examples and illustrations - many sections)

Greek New Testament Insert has The Verbs: Tense and Aspect => logosres:chapman;art=s.2.3.0;off=2 (example sentences along with historical aorist usage myths, followed by many sections with verbal illustrations)

Reference grammars have more in depth discussions - including categorizing verbal aspect by contextual usage:

Syntax of the Moods and Tenses in New Testament Greek => logosres:mtntg;ref=Page.p_1;off=57

A Grammar of the Greek New Testament in the Light of Historical Research => logosres:ggntlhr;ref=Page.p_xxi (includes chapters on Voice, Tense, Mode) has in depth discussions, including verbal difficulty of subject in Chapter VIII logosres:ggntlhr;ref=Page.p_303;off=44

 

Kevin Becker:
And when you think the verb is hard say to yourself "At least I haven't hit participles yet" (Devil sorry, couldn't help myself)

To be followed by genitive absolute Embarrassed (from greek language exam that proved my need to learn more)

 

Keep Smiling Smile

Posts 44
Bob Fuller | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jan 18 2011 8:18 PM

Nothing is "simple" about a foreign language. When it gets simple, it gets misunderstood, sometimes grossly.

The other responses are good. You might look at Mounce, Basics of NT Greek. Other than that, remember the fog will lift as you go along. Do not lose heart.

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jan 18 2011 10:40 PM

For a general orientation I'd  suggest http://www.sil.org/linguistics/GlossaryOflinguisticTerms/  which allows you to understand the concepts independently from how it is expressed in Greek. Then any of the various recommended Logos resources are reasonable next steps.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 218
Scott Burke | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jan 19 2011 6:45 AM

Thank you everyone for your words of encouragement and suggestions on some resources that may help clear my fog.  The fog was not so dense in class today.  I enjoy learning Koine Greek but at times my impatience gets the best of me.  

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Kevin Becker | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jan 19 2011 7:01 AM

Fog eh? You must be using Mounce Smile

Posts 218
Scott Burke | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jan 19 2011 7:19 AM

Kevin Becker:

Fog eh? You must be using Mounce Smile

Kevin, you would be correct Smile

 

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