Learning Biblical Greek and Hebrew

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Rick Williams | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 22 2011 5:47 AM

When I took Latin, it wasn't a dead language....g   Actually a private college prep school.  It was either Latin or French and with Latin I didn't have to run around speaking it. 

Posts 1130
Keith Larson | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 22 2011 10:20 AM

George Somsel:
It's a rare high school that offers Latin today

 

That is too bad.  I found this quote today from the Polis Institute today (http://www.polisjerusalem.org/).

"Two sources have been nourishing the Western World ever since ancient times: the Judeo-Christian culture and the Greek and Latin literature. However, most of this heritage remains inaccessible to the general public.

For example, the treaties of Galen, who has bequeathed us more than 20,000 pages of medical knowledge in Greek, have been translated entirely only into Latin and Arabic. Less than ten percent of Galen’s writings are now available in translation to the major European languages. Likewise, only a small part of the writings of Alcuin, the architect of the Carolingian Renaissance, is accessible in any language other than Latin.

More than half of the writings from Ancient and Medieval times can be read today only in Greek, Latin, Hebrew or Arabic. Hence, the 21st century man finds himself unable to understand and to assimilate his spiritual heritage, as it has become impossible for him to access his cultural roots. For this reason we consider languages to be an indispensable gateway to Human sciences."

I did not realize that over 50% of the writings of the Ancient and Medieval periods have not been translated into any modern language.  Those languages may be "dead" but they are far from useless!

BTW my high school daughter is taking Latin.  She is using Lingua Latina and loves it.  I think it would be exciting if someone did something like this for Koine Greek.  Perhaps a story of a family in Galilee at the time of Jesus.  In the later chapters you could include actual quotations from the gospels.  In addition, to teaching Greek it would be an excellent way of teaching about first century Jewish culture.

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George Somsel | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 22 2011 10:36 AM

Keith Larson:

BTW my high school daughter is taking Latin.  She is using Lingua Latina and loves it.  I think it would be exciting if someone did something like this for Koine Greek.  Perhaps a story of a family in Galilee at the time of Jesus.  In the later chapters you could include actual quotations from the gospels.  In addition, to teaching Greek it would be an excellent way of teaching about first century Jewish culture.

How about something like this (or simply this) ?

http://www.archive.org/details/greekboyathomest01rousuoft

george
gfsomsel

יְמֵי־שְׁנוֹתֵינוּ בָהֶם שִׁבְעִים שָׁנָה וְאִם בִּגְבוּרֹת שְׁמוֹנִים שָׁנָה וְרָהְבָּם עָמָל וָאָוֶן

Posts 1130
Keith Larson | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 22 2011 11:37 AM

The Greek Boy at Home, Athenaze, Reading Greek, Thrasymachus and Ancient Greek Alive are all close to what you get in Lingua Latina, but not up to its high standards.  What is neat about Lingua Latina is it is 100% Latin.  It uses Latin to teach you Latin. 0% English! It is truly amazing how it works. It starts off with words any reader who knows one of the major European languages can recognize and then builds from there.  Within the first paragraph you learn that "est" means "is," "et" means "and," "sunt" means "are."

The closest thing to this right now is the Italian version of Athenaze. http://www.vivariumnovum.it/edizioni/index.php/component/option,com_flippingbook/catid,1/id,22/view,book/

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