Electronic distractibility

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Jason Kanz | Forum Activity | Posted: Sat, Jul 2 2011 4:49 AM

I found this article in The Independent quite interesting. 

Professionally, I am a neuropsychologist and so specialize in memory and attention.  A common complaint that my patients bring is that they simply cannot focus.  They then share with me how "wired" they are; thousands of texts sent per month, a central line from their brains to Facebook. 

As users of Logos (an electronic resource) and presumably bibliophiles, how have you found reading in the electronic age?  Are you more easily distracted?  Perhaps more importantly, how can we flourish in a society of changing media?

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Wild Eagle | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 2 2011 8:08 AM

With Logos, it becomes harder to be focus on the Word, with such massive library, it s easy to get distracted. Additionally forum adds more distraction :)

"No man is greater than his prayer life. The pastor who is not praying is playing; the people who are not praying are straying." Leonard Ravenhill 

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DMB | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 2 2011 8:39 AM

I don't know if 'distraction' is appropriate for me visia viz 'electronics'. For me the larger issue is Logos' immense connectivity of information. For example in reading commentaries on  Pseudepigrapha, the fact that Logos has available 7-8 other connected sources of information on the general area significantly colors ones interpretation (e.g. Philo, Mishnah, DSS, etc). In other words, as I'm reading along, I frequently bounce into other resources for additional comparison that the original authors probably never imagined. Soon, I've completely lost track of where I started.

"God will save his fallen angels and their broken wings He'll mend."

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Rich DeRuiter | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 2 2011 9:03 AM

DocKanz:

I found this article in The Independent quite interesting. 

Professionally, I am a neuropsychologist and so specialize in memory and attention.  A common complaint that my patients bring is that they simply cannot focus.  They then share with me how "wired" they are; thousands of texts sent per month, a central line from their brains to Facebook. 

As users of Logos (an electronic resource) and presumably bibliophiles, how have you found reading in the electronic age?  Are you more easily distracted?  Perhaps more importantly, how can we flourish in a society of changing media?

I'm not sure the sky is falling, even if paper books are on the way out. As someone diagnosed with ADD, I know that long before there was such a thing as an electronic book, I found myself often distracted while reading, even in the quiet seminary library. If it wasn't the way the study carrel was cleaned, leaving sweeping streaks that reminded me of rainbows or waves, maybe, it was the smell of cigarette smoke of someone who just walked by, or the way the carpet was beginning to unravel at a seam. Even walking through the stacks on the way back and forth to the bathroom was enough to pull me into paging through a book with an interesting title, or cover.

Now, as I sit at my computer and study, I have even more things to distract me, but my level of distractability hasn't gone up. It's easier to let myself be distracted, but I know that with ADD often the best I can do is manage the distractibility rather than overcome it somehow. This requires a degree of self-coaching, of scheduled, physical movement, lots of caffeine (to self-medicate -- works about as well as prescription med's I've tried with fewer side effects), and closing out as much distraction as I can by keeping my study door closed and, when others are around, putting on some background (usually instrumental) music, just to mask the sounds.

The really nice thing about electronic media, like Logos, is that after I've been distracted and want to come back to where I was, the books are all still open to exactly the same place. Also, since copy/paste (e.g.) is so easy, I can avoid the nearly painful tedium of copying by hand into my sermon notes. Finally, I can have 7 Bibles open to different places, 17 commentaries, 2 Greek Bibles, the LXX, a Hebrew Bible, 3 note files and 2 searches all open to where I last left them. With paper books, this isn't possible without a very, very large desk. But as my mind likes to take in from multiple streams simultaneously (one way of understanding ADD as an advantage), this works well for me.

 Help links: WIKI;  Logos 6 FAQ. (Phil. 2:14, NIV)

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Praiser | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 2 2011 10:00 AM

Richard DeRuiter:
The really nice thing about electronic media, like Logos, is that after I've been distracted and want to come back to where I was, the books are all still open to exactly the same place. Also, since copy/paste (e.g.) is so easy, I can avoid the nearly painful tedium of copying by hand into my sermon notes. Finally, I can have 7 Bibles open to different places, 17 commentaries, 2 Greek Bibles, the LXX, a Hebrew Bible, 3 note files and 2 searches all open to where I last left them. With paper books, this isn't possible without a very, very large desk.

My problem is I tend to not want to close any of my resources during a study and my layout gets quite full. More of an organization thing for me...but I have started to use favorite files more and the http://wiki.logos.com/Creating_your_own_Custom_Go_Box  as well as Steve Clarks add-ons http://www.quicklink.clark-tx.net/QL%20Helper%20Apps.htm and http://www.clark-tx.net/mfavs/default.html

Probably a bigger distraction is the Logos ForumHuh?

Posts 187
Anthony Etienne | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 2 2011 12:57 PM

What I'm learning to do, when I find myself going down a rabbit trail; whether from checking out a scripture reference or commentary, wordstudy etc. Is to ask myself, is this info adding to the original point/topic of my study or not? To help me in this; I've learned to use the note feature, the way (I believe) Logos intended for me to use it. If the rabbit trail is helpful, I note it and try to get back to my orignal point of study. I've had more failures than success in this, but you have to start somewhere. Big Smile

Also some inspirational instrumental worship music in the background is very helpful. I usually have more focus, when I do these studies after my devotional prayer time. As opposed to jumping in after coming in from some other secular activity like sports or movie watching etc. Not that you can't, it is just more distracting for me personally.

Tony

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Jacob Hantla | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 2 2011 1:08 PM

Just another area of life in which we must diligently exercise self control. E-media isn't the problem, just exposes the problem within.

Jacob Hantla
Pastor/Elder, Grace Bible Church
gbcaz.org

Posts 43
Jason Kanz | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 2 2011 1:59 PM

Jacob Hantla:

Just another area of life in which we must diligently exercise self control. E-media isn't the problem, just exposes the problem within.

YesYesYes

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Bill Moore | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 2 2011 6:03 PM

I think this is a valid concern, one I've considered a great deal recently. I've come through the decades from an all-paper approach to sermon preparation to a mostly electronic approach. I cannot say I've done well in the self-discipline department.

Still, I can remember being really distracted searching for a word in a paper dictionary. So many words to tantalize me, tempting me to check them all out!

Pastor, Cornerstone Baptist Church, Clinton, SC

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