Study Bible Notes

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JRS | Forum Activity | Posted: Tue, Oct 4 2011 7:28 AM

 

I wonder if it would feasible to collect notes from as many study bibles as possible and publish them in a single Logos resource?  This would include any and all ... from Reformed to Dispensational to Lutheran to Wesleyan to Pentecostal to cults to whatever ... all gathered together in one resource and organized by verse for comparison.   It would be interesting  ...

How blessed is the one whom Thou dost choose, and bring near to Thee(Psa 65:4a)

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Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 4 2011 7:57 AM

While is sounds interesting i am fairly sure from a publishing point of view it would be a near nightmare, and I would guess some publishers might not want their "good scholarship" mixed in with "suspect scholarship". 

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 4 2011 1:22 PM

JRS:
I wonder if it would feasible to collect notes from as many study bibles as possible and publish them in a single Logos resource? 

There is a practical version of this that Logos could do - parallel display of commentaries much like the parallel displays of the Gospels.

 

 

ref.

RSB

LSB

ESVSB

NETN

HSB

Mt. 5:1

§ 5:1-7:29 The Sermon on the Mount is the first of five great blocks of Jesus' teaching in Matthew (Introduction: Characteristics and Themes). It is the classic statement of the ethics of the kingdom of God. The early church favored a literal interpretation but fully applied the sermon only to special classes of Christians, especially monastics. Others, such as the Anabaptists, have attempted to apply it literally to every Christian. Still others have viewed it as legalistic, as a provisional, temporary code, or as a heightening of the law of Moses with the aim of inducing repentance (Luther). Finally, some have argued that the demands of the sermon are not to be understood literally, but that Jesus was concerned with inward disposition rather than outward conduct, or that the severity of the sermon is intended to compel a decision by the hearers either for or against God's demands on their lives.

We must recognize that the sermon is directed to the disciples and through them to the whole church today. The sermon addresses both inward motives and outward conduct (5:21, 22, 27, 28). These legitimate demands are so strict (5:48) that no one can completely obey them, and we are therefore driven to the grace and mercy of God. In some cases Jesus uses obviously intentional exaggeration to illustrate the absolute requirements of God's law (5:29, 30).

§ 5:1 went up on a mountain. The content of this sermon is similar to the sermon on the plain recorded in Luke 6.

was seated. It was customary for teachers to sit while teaching (Luke 4:20).[1]

 

5:1 Seeing the crowds. Jesus separated Himself from the "great crowds" (4:25), though some did hear His teaching (7:28). mountain. Location unknown. Mountains were common sites for significant events (cf 17:1). Jesus' teaching in chs 5-7 has long been known as the Sermon on the Mount. It is the first of five major sermons, or discourses, in Mt (cf ch 10; 13:1-52; ch 18; chs 24-25). Aug: "The sermon before us is perfect in all the precepts by which the Christian life is moulded" (NPNF 1 6:3). sat down. Rabbis typically sat to teach. disciples. Gk mathetes; "learner," "apprentice." Common in Gospels and Ac, but never used in Epistles. Often means the 12 called "apostles" (10:1-2), but can also mean a larger group of adherents. The feminine form appears once (see note, Ac 9:36). Here, the term includes the four fishermen (cf 4:18-22) plus others from the crowds who responded to Jesus' call to repent.[2]

5:1-7:29 The Authoritative Message of the Messiah: Kingdom Life for His Disciples. This is the first of five major discourses in Matthew (chs. 5-7; 10; 13; 18-20; 24-25). Speaking to his disciples (5:1), Jesus expounds the reality of discipleship lived in the presence and power of the kingdom of God but within the everyday world. Some interpreters have thought the purpose of this sermon was to describe a moral standard so impossibly high that it is relevant only for a future millennial kingdom. Others have thought its primary purpose was to portray the absoluteness of God's moral perfection and thereby to drive people to despair of their own righteousness, so they will trust in the imputed righteousness of Christ. Both views fail to recognize that these teachings, rightly understood, form a challenging but practical ethic that Jesus expects his followers to live by in this present age. The sermon, commonly called the "Sermon on the Mount," is probably a summary of a longer message, but the structure is a unified whole. It has similarities to the "Sermon on the Plain" in Luke 6:17-49, but there are also significant differences. The three main theories about their relationship are: (1) they record the same sermon but Matthew and Luke give summaries that report different sections and emphases; (2) they record two different sermons, given on different occasions but repeating much of the same content, as itinerant preachers often do; and (3) either Matthew or Luke, or both, have collected sayings that Jesus gave on different occasions and put them together in a sermon format. View (3) seems to make Matthew's presentation of this as a single historical event untruthful (cf. Matt. 5:1-2 with 7:28-29; 8:1; and Luke 6:17, 20 with Luke 7:1), and evangelical commentators have not generally adopted it. Views (1) and (2) are both possible, and it is difficult to decide between them.

 

5:1-16 Setting, Beatitudes, and Witness of the Kingdom of Heaven. In his Beatitudes, Jesus makes pronouncements to the crowds and religious leaders and gives instructions to his disciples concerning the nature of life in the kingdom (vv. 3-12). He follows this with two piercing metaphors on salt and light to illustrate the impact that the disciples will have on the world around them (vv. 13-16).

5:1 mountain. The traditional site of this sermon (though Matthew does not pinpoint the location) is above Tabgha, near Capernaum, on a ridge of hills northwest of the town, with a magnificent view of the Sea of Galilee. A twentieth-century church marks this site today, although down the hill in Tabgha there are remains of a small Byzantine chapel (probably from the 4th century) commemorating the sermon. This ridge is likely also where Jesus went "to a desolate place" (14:13; cf. Mark 1:35) and where he went "up on the mountain" (Matt. 14:23; 28:16). he sat down. Teachers in Judaism typically taught while sitting (cf. 23:2), a position Jesus takes regularly (cf. 13:1-2; 15:29; 24:3-4; 26:55).[3]

 

1 tn Here δέ (de) has not been translated.

2 tn Or "up a mountain" (εἰς τὸ ὄρος, eis to oros).

sn The expression up the mountain here may be idiomatic or generic, much like the English "he went to the hospital" (cf. 15:29), or even intentionally reminiscent of Exod 24:12 (LXX), since the genre of the Sermon on the Mount seems to be that of a new Moses giving a new law.[4]

 

Ver. 1.  What is said here, does not follow immediately what was said in the preceding chapter.  See Luke vi.[5]

Mt. 5:2

 

 

5:2 While Jesus was seated, he opened his mouth (a Jewish idiom) and taught them, i.e., his disciples who had come to him (v. 1). "Disciples" (Gk. "learners") were those who had made a commitment to Jesus as the Messiah; the "crowds" (v. 1) were those who were curious and often astounded by his teaching and ministry (7:28-29) yet for the most part remained neutral and uncommitted.Devil

3 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as "then" to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

4 tn Grk "And opening his mouth he taught them, saying." The imperfect verb ἐδίδασκεν (edidasken) has been translated ingressively.[7]

 

Ver. 2.  Opening his mouth.  It is a Hebraism, to signify he began to speak.  Wi. - This is a common expression in Scripture, to signify something important is about to be spoken.  Thus it is used in various other places, as "Job opening his mouth cursed his day, and said," &c.  Daniel, c. x. et alibi.  Jan. - And why is it added, says S. Chry. "and opening his mouth," without doubt that we might know, that not only when he spoke, but even when silent, he gave instruction: sometimes, therefore, he opened his mouth; at other times he spoke by his very actions.  Hom. xv.Music

Mt. 5:3

5:3 Blessed. This means more than the emotional state represented by the word "happy." It includes spiritual well-being, having the approval of God, and thus a happier destiny (Ps. 1).

poor in spirit. Those with the greater spiritual need are more likely to perceive their need and depend on God alone and not their own goodness. Paul notes the same principle in Rom. 9:30, 31. The parallel in Luke 6:20 omits "in spirit." This has led many to suppose Jesus primarily spoke of the materially poor. Material poverty and recognition of spiritual need often go together (Ps. 9:18 note), but the two kinds of poverty are not identical.[9]

 

5:3-11 Blessed. Jesus began His sermon by nine times declaring His disciples blessed because of what God had in store for them. Jesus was not making ethical demands of His followers but was describing blessings they would fully enjoy in the new heaven and new earth (Rv 21:1). The beatitudes are a common literary form found throughout Scripture (e.g., Ps 1:1; Lk 11:28; Rv 19:9). See p 842.

5:3 poor in spirit. The spiritually poor who acknowledge their moral bankruptcy. Cf Lk 4:18. theirs is the kingdom of heaven. A possession that disciples enjoy even now by faith. This blessing is repeated in v 10. Aug: "The one reward, which is the kingdom of heaven, is variously named [in the Beatitudes]" (NPNF 1 6:7). See pp 1565-66.[10]

 

5:3-12 The Beatitudes all begin with "Blessed are ..." They are called "beatitudes" from Latin beatus, "blessed, happy" (but see note on v. 3). These short statements summarize the essence of the Sermon on the Mount.

5:3 Blessed. More than a temporary or circumstantial feeling of happiness, this is a state of well-being in relationship to God that belongs to those who respond to Jesus' ministry. The poor in spirit are those who recognize they are in need of God's help. theirs is the kingdom of heaven. It belongs to those who confess their spiritual bankruptcy. On a contrast with the first seven beatitudes, see note on 23:13-36.

Jesus' Five Discourses

The authoritative message of the Messiah (Sermon on the Mount)

 

chs. 5-7

 

The authoritative mission of the Messiah's messengers

 

ch. 10

 

The mysteries of the messianic kingdom revealed in parables

 

ch. 13

 

The community of the Messiah revealed

 

chs. 18-20

 

The delay, return, and judgment of the Messiah (Olivet Discourse)

 

chs. 24-25

 

5 sn The term Blessed introduces the first of several beatitudes promising blessing to those whom God cares for. They serve as an invitation to come into the grace God offers.

6 sn The poor in spirit is a reference to the "pious poor" for whom God especially cares. See Ps 14:6; 22:24; 25:16; 34:6; 40:17; 69:29.

7 sn The present tense (belongs) here is significant. Jesus makes the kingdom and its blessings currently available. This phrase is unlike the others in the list with the possessive pronoun being emphasized.[11]

 

Ver. 3.  The poor in spirit;[1] which, according to the common exposition, signifies the humble of mind and heart.  Yet some understand it of such as are truly in poverty and want, and who bear their indigent condition with patience and resignation.  Wi. - That is, the humble; and they whose spirit is not set upon riches.  Ch. - It is not without reason that the beatitudes are disposed of in this order.  Each preceding one prepares the way for what immediately follows, furnishing us in particular with spiritual arms of such graces as are necessary for obtaining the virtue of the subsequent beatitude.  Thus the poor in spirit, i.e. the truly humble, will mourn for their transgressions, and whoever is filled with sorrow and confusion for his own sins, cannot but be just, and behave to others with meekness and clemency; when possessed of these virtues, he then becomes pure and clean of heart.  Peace of conscience reigns in this assemblage of virtues, and cannot be expelled the soul by any tribulations, persecutions, or injustices of men.  Chry. hom. xv.  What is this poverty of spirit, but humility and contrition?  This virtue of humility is placed in the first place, because it is the parent of every other virtue, as pride is the mother of every vice.  Pride deprived our first parents of their original innocence, and nothing but humility can restore us to our former purity.  We may pray and fast, we may be possessed of mercy, chastity, or any virtues, if humility do not accompany them, they will be like the virtue of the Pharisee, without foundation, without fruit.  Hom. xv.[12]

Mt. 5:4

5:4 those who mourn. The context indicates that these are mourning over sin and evil, especially their own, and over the failure of mankind to give proper glory to God.[13]

5:4 mourn. Over sin; similar to the spiritually poor (see note, v 3). comforted. The comfort the Messiah brings will be fully realized in heaven.[14]

5:4 those who mourn. The spiritual, emotional, or financial loss resulting from sin should lead to mourning and a longing for God's forgiveness and healing (cf. 2 Cor. 7:10).[15]

8 sn The promise they will be comforted is the first of several "reversals" noted in these promises. The beatitudes and the reversals that accompany them serve in the sermon as an invitation to enter into God's care, because one can know God cares for those who turn to him.[16]

Ver. 4.  The land of the living, or the kingdom of heaven.  The evangelist prefers calling it the land of the living in this place, to shew that the meek, the humble, and the oppressed, who are spoiled of the possession of this earth by the powerful and the proud, shall obtain the inheritance of a better land.  M. - "They shall possess the land," is the reward annexed by our Saviour to meekness, that he might not differ in any point from the old law, so well known to the persons he was addressing.  David, in psalm xxxvi, had made the same promise to the meek.  If temporal blessings are promised to some of the virtues in the beatitudes, it is that temporal blessings might always accompany the more solid rewards of grace.  But spiritual rewards are always the principal, always ranked in the first place, all who practice these virtues are pronounced blessed.  Hom. xv.[17]

Mt. 5:5

§ 5:5 the meek. This beatitude resembles and is perhaps based on Ps. 37:11. The meekness in view is spiritual meekness, an attitude of humility and submission to God. Our pattern for meekness is Jesus (the same Greek word is translated "gentle" in 11:29), who submits to the will of His Father.

inherit the earth. The ultimate fulfillment of the promise to Abraham, whom Paul calls "heir of the world" (Rom. 4:13; cf. Heb. 11:16).[18]

 

5:5 meek. Lowly, humble. inherit the earth. See "portion," p 7. We will inherit the new heavens and new earth after our bodies are resurrected on the Last Day.[19]

5:5 The meek are the "gentle" (cf. 11:29), those who do not assert themselves over others in order to further their own agendas in their own strength, but who will nonetheless inherit the earth because they trust in God to direct the outcome of events. Cf. Ps. 37:11.[20]

 

Ver. 5.  Not those that mourn for worldly motives, but such as mourn for their sins, are blessed.  The sorrow that is according to God, says S. Paul, worketh penance steadfast unto salvation, but the sorrow of the world worketh death.  2 Cor. vii. 10.  The same is promised in S. John; (xvi. 20,) you shall weep and lament, but the world shall rejoice; and you shall be sorrowful, but your sorrow shall be turned into joy.  M.[21]

Mt. 5:6

§ 5:6 hunger ... for righteousness. Those who seek God's righteousness receive what they desire, not those who are confident of their own righteousness.[22]

5:6 hunger and thirst for righteousness. Fervent desire for God's righteousness, or salvation (Is 51:5-8; cf 3:15). On "righteousness," see p 1904. satisfied. Luth: "We have the clear assurance that God does not cast aside sinners, that is, those who recognize their sin and desire to come to their senses, who thirst for righteousness (Matt. 5:6)" (AE 2:41).[23]

5:6 Those who hunger and thirst for righteousness recognize that God is the ultimate source of real righteousness, so they long for his righteous character to be evident in people's lives on earth. They shall be satisfied by responding to his invitation to be in relationship with him.[24]

9 sn Those who hunger are people like the poor Jesus has already mentioned. The term has OT roots both in conjunction with the poor (Isa 32:6-7; 58:6-7, 9-10; Ezek 18:7, 16) or by itself (Ps 37:16-19; 107:9).[25]

Ver. 6.  Hunger and thirst; i.e. spiritually, with an earnest desire of being just and holy.  But others again understand such as endure with patience the hardships of hunger and thirst.  Wi. - Rupertus understands those to whom justice is denied, such as poor widows and orphans.  Maldonatus those who from poverty really suffer hunger and thirst, because justice is not done them.  M. - They shall be filled with every kind of good in their heavenly country.  I shall be filled when thy glory shall appear.  Psalm xvi.[26]

Mt. 5:7

 

5:7 merciful ... receive mercy. A disciple who truly appreciates God's blessings will be a merciful person and will receive mercy (cf 18:33). See p 1903.[27]

5:7 The kindness and forgiveness that the merciful show to others will also be shown to them.[28]

 

Ver. 7.  Not only the giving of alms, but the practice of all works of mercy, both corporal and spiritual, are recommended here, and the reward will be given on that day when God will repay every one according to his works, and will do by us, as we have done by our brethren.  A.[29]

Mt. 5:8

§ 5:8 they shall see God. Because God is a spirit, His divine essence is invisible (Col. 1:15; 1 Tim. 1:17; 6:16). Nevertheless, believers will "see" God through the insight of faith, and Jesus assured His disciples that in seeing Him they had "seen the Father" (John 14:9). In the glorified state, God's children will "see Him as He is" (1 John 3:2).[30]

5:8 pure in heart. Those who do not worship false gods. Aug: "A pure heart ... is a single heart: and just as this light cannot be seen, except with pure eyes; so neither is God seen, unless that is pure by which He can be seen" (NPNF 1 6:5). see God. The worshiper in Ps 24 who sought the face of God experienced the coming of the King of glory (vv 7-10). Such disciples look forward to seeing God. See note, Jn 1:18.[31]

5:8 The pure in heart are those whose pursuit of purity and uprightness affects every area of life. they shall see God. Note the ultimate fulfillment in Rev. 22:4; cf. note on John 1:18. In contrast to Jewish traditions that overemphasized external ritual purity, Jesus taught that purity of heart was most important (cf. note on Matt. 5:28).[32]

 

Ver. 8.  The clean of heart are either those who give themselves to the practice of every virtue, and are conscious to themselves of no evil, or those who are adorned with the virtue of chastity.  For nothing is so necessary as this purity in such as desire to see God.  Keep peace with all and chastity, says S. Paul, for without this none can see God.  Many are merciful to the poor and just in their dealings, but abstain not from luxury and lust.  Therefore our Saviour, wishing to shew that mercy was not sufficient, adds, that if we would see God, we must also be possessed of the virtue of purity.  S. Chry. hom. xv.  By this, we shall have our heart exempt from all disordinate love of creatures, and shall be exclusively attached to God.  A. - The clean of heart, i.e. they who are clean from sin: who are pure in body and mind, says S. Chrysostom.  It seems to be a particular admonition to the Jews, who were mostly solicitous about an outward and legal cleanness.  Wi.[33]

Mt. 5:9

5:9 peacemakers. Spiritual peace, not the cessation of physical violence between nations, is in view. Although the term is usually understood to mean those who help others find peace with God, this peace can also be understood as those who have made their own peace with God and are called His children. The principle is extended in vv. 44, 45-the children of God make peace, even with their enemies.[34]

5:9 peacemakers. Jesus would send out His disciples to bring peace to those who were worthy (10:13). called sons of God. The Son of God is named the Prince of Peace (Is 9:6). Those who trust in Him are blessed by being God's sons and daughters (Gal 3:26-28).[35]

5:9 peacemakers. Those who promote God's messianic peace (Hb. shalom, total well-being both personally and communally) will receive the ultimate reward of being called sons of God (see note on Gal. 3:26) as they reflect the character of their heavenly Father.[36]

10 tn Grk "sons," though traditionally English versions have taken this as a generic reference to both males and females, hence "children" (cf. KJV, NAB, NRSV, NLT).[37]

Ver. 9.  To be peaceful ourselves and with others, and to bring such as are at variance together, will entitle us to be children of God.  Thus we shall be raised to a participation in the honour of the only begotten Son of God, who descended from heaven to bring peace to man, and to reconcile him with his offended Creator.  Chry. hom. xv.[38]

 



[1] Luder G. Whitlock, R. C. Sproul, Bruce K. Waltke and Moisš Silva, Reformation Study Bible, the : Bringing the Light of the Reformation to Scripture : New King James Version, Mt 5:1-7:29 (Nashville: T. Nelson, 1995).

Aug Augustine

NPNF Schaff, Philip, ed. A Select Library of Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers of the Christian Church, Series 1. 14 vols. New York: The Christian Literature Series, 1886-89. Reprint, Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1956.

 1 Schaff, Philip, ed. A Select Library of Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers of the Christian Church, Series 1. 14 vols. New York: The Christian Literature Series, 1886-89. Reprint, Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1956.

Gk Greek

[2] Edward A. Engelbrecht, The Lutheran Study Bible, 1585 (St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House, 2009).

[3] Crossway Bibles, The ESV Study Bible, 1827 (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles, 2008).

LXX Septuagint (the Greek Old Testament, translated between 250-100 BC)

[4] Biblical Studies Press, The NET Bible First Edition Notes, Mt 5:1 (Biblical Studies Press, 2006; 2006).

[5] DR, Haydock Commentary.

Devil Crossway Bibles, The ESV Study Bible, 1827 (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles, 2008).

[7] Biblical Studies Press, The NET Bible First Edition Notes, Mt 5:2 (Biblical Studies Press, 2006; 2006).

Music DR, Haydock Commentary.

[9] Luder G. Whitlock, R. C. Sproul, Bruce K. Waltke and Moisš Silva, Reformation Study Bible, the : Bringing the Light of the Reformation to Scripture : New King James Version, Mt 5:3 (Nashville: T. Nelson, 1995).

Aug Augustine

NPNF Schaff, Philip, ed. A Select Library of Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers of the Christian Church, Series 1. 14 vols. New York: The Christian Literature Series, 1886-89. Reprint, Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1956.

 1 Schaff, Philip, ed. A Select Library of Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers of the Christian Church, Series 1. 14 vols. New York: The Christian Literature Series, 1886-89. Reprint, Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1956.

[10] Edward A. Engelbrecht, The Lutheran Study Bible, 1585 (St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House, 2009).

[11] Biblical Studies Press, The NET Bible First Edition Notes, Mt 5:3 (Biblical Studies Press, 2006; 2006).

[12] DR, Haydock Commentary.

[13] Luder G. Whitlock, R. C. Sproul, Bruce K. Waltke and Moisš Silva, Reformation Study Bible, the : Bringing the Light of the Reformation to Scripture : New King James Version, Mt 5:4 (Nashville: T. Nelson, 1995).

[14] Edward A. Engelbrecht, The Lutheran Study Bible, 1585 (St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House, 2009).

[15] Crossway Bibles, The ESV Study Bible, 1828 (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles, 2008).

[16] Biblical Studies Press, The NET Bible First Edition Notes, Mt 5:4 (Biblical Studies Press, 2006; 2006).

[17] DR, Haydock Commentary.

[18] Luder G. Whitlock, R. C. Sproul, Bruce K. Waltke and Moisš Silva, Reformation Study Bible, the : Bringing the Light of the Reformation to Scripture : New King James Version, Mt 5:5 (Nashville: T. Nelson, 1995).

[19] Edward A. Engelbrecht, The Lutheran Study Bible, 1586 (St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House, 2009).

[20] Crossway Bibles, The ESV Study Bible, 1828 (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles, 2008).

[21] DR, Haydock Commentary.

[22] Luder G. Whitlock, R. C. Sproul, Bruce K. Waltke and Moisš Silva, Reformation Study Bible, the : Bringing the Light of the Reformation to Scripture : New King James Version, Mt 5:6 (Nashville: T. Nelson, 1995).

Luth Martin Luther

AE Luther, Martin. Luther's Works. American Edition. General editors Jaroslav Pelikan and Helmut T. Lehmann. 56 vols. St. Louis: Concordia, and Philadelphia: Muhlenberg and Fortress, 1955-86.

[23] Edward A. Engelbrecht, The Lutheran Study Bible, 1586 (St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House, 2009).

[24] Crossway Bibles, The ESV Study Bible, 1828 (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles, 2008).

[25] Biblical Studies Press, The NET Bible First Edition Notes, Mt 5:5-6 (Biblical Studies Press, 2006; 2006).

[26] DR, Haydock Commentary.

[27] Edward A. Engelbrecht, The Lutheran Study Bible, 1586 (St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House, 2009).

[28] Crossway Bibles, The ESV Study Bible, 1828 (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles, 2008).

[29] DR, Haydock Commentary.

[30] Luder G. Whitlock, R. C. Sproul, Bruce K. Waltke and Moisš Silva, Reformation Study Bible, the : Bringing the Light of the Reformation to Scripture : New King James Version, Mt 5:8 (Nashville: T. Nelson, 1995).

Aug Augustine

NPNF Schaff, Philip, ed. A Select Library of Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers of the Christian Church, Series 1. 14 vols. New York: The Christian Literature Series, 1886-89. Reprint, Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1956.

 1 Schaff, Philip, ed. A Select Library of Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers of the Christian Church, Series 1. 14 vols. New York: The Christian Literature Series, 1886-89. Reprint, Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1956.

[31] Edward A. Engelbrecht, The Lutheran Study Bible, 1586 (St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House, 2009).

[32] Crossway Bibles, The ESV Study Bible, 1828 (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles, 2008).

[33] DR, Haydock Commentary.

[34] Luder G. Whitlock, R. C. Sproul, Bruce K. Waltke and Moisš Silva, Reformation Study Bible, the : Bringing the Light of the Reformation to Scripture : New King James Version, Mt 5:9 (Nashville: T. Nelson, 1995).

[35] Edward A. Engelbrecht, The Lutheran Study Bible, 1586 (St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House, 2009).

[36] Crossway Bibles, The ESV Study Bible, 1828 (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles, 2008).

KJV The King James Version, known in Britain as the Authorized Version (1611)

NAB The New American Bible

NRSV New Revised Standard Version (1989)

NLT New Living Translation

[37] Biblical Studies Press, The NET Bible First Edition Notes, Mt 5:7-9 (Biblical Studies Press, 2006; 2006).

[38] DR, Haydock Commentary.

 

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Mark Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 4 2011 2:14 PM

MJ. Smith:
There is a practical version of this that Logos could do - parallel display of commentaries much like the parallel displays of the Gospels.

Or like Text Comparison.

It is not a bad idea, but in a way we can do this already by opening up multiple study Bibles or commentaries, arranging then side-by-side, and synching them together. A bit more work, granted, but still possible. I have no trouble stacking commentaries in a single pane and clicking each tab to see the next commentary.

I can see some issues trying to do this with the format of various commentaries. Those like Word have info on a single verse in a couple of sections, while most others gather it all together in one place.

As I said, Text Comparison is laid out like your suggestion but with TC one is interested in word-by-word comparison, just as one is with Bible harmonies. Side-by-side columns help with this. I am not interested in comparing commentaries or study Bible notes in the same way. I might like seeing a few at one glance but I wouldn't expect to compare them word-for-word with each other. Thus I don't see the need for this in the same way as with TC and Harmonies. Not saying it might not be nice, just not too necessary.

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Bridgeport, CT USA

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 4 2011 2:32 PM

Mark Smith:
I can see some issues trying to do this with the format of various commentaries.

I agree that the format would not be satisfactory for commentaries - just for "note" sized units as in Study Bibles.

The main things that a side-by-side display offers that the multiple panes does not are the white space showing that there is no comment and always having the parallels aligned without changing the verse in focus. This strikes me as highly advantageous for the casual user ... but of little use to the heavy user.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 9265
Forum MVP
Mark Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 4 2011 2:50 PM

MJ. Smith:
This strikes me as highly advantageous for the casual user ...

Yes it might help them quite a bit. I suspect there are quite a few users who never get far beyond what Logos dishes up when you type a verse into the Go box on the Home Page. Put it on the tools menu.

Pastor, North Park Baptist Church

Bridgeport, CT USA

Posts 98
Tim Lord | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 4 2011 4:19 PM

I think that M.J.'s suggestion is innovative, it would be a very useful feature in Logos to have that people would use.  And, I think it would work with a number of commentaries, too, such as the one volume commentaries.  It is true that such a format would not typically be used for in-depth study, but it would be very convenient for getting a high-level overview, which is one of the first steps taken in Bible study.  There are times that I am posed with a question in Small Group study where a quick look-up of a passage in question using a tool that displays multiple side-by-sources at a glance would be very helpful to have.  We can do this today with multiple Bible translations, so why not be able to do the same with commentaries and study Bible notes? The current solution, to click from tab to tab of multiple open commentary resources, is slow.  M.J.'s solution improvwes upon that.  Today I use the Exegetical Summaries to get the equivalent of what M.J. is suggesting.  and the Exegetical Summaries do have their place because they are summaries.  But what M.J. is suggesting is unique because I can then mix and match however I like with whatever my favorites.  I really like the idea, it has value, and I hope Logos picks up on this innovation and implements it.

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 4 2011 5:26 PM

Mark Smith:
I suspect there are quite a few users who never get far beyond what Logos dishes up when you type a verse into the Go box on the Home Page. Put it on the tools menu.
I think you're right. I also think that Logos ought to put some focus on serving the Sunday School teacher/Bible study leader by making the presentation of information "good enough" for projecting on a wall, I know that some professors use Logos in that manner and think it could be used a earlier levels. I'm not thinking full fledged presentation level, I mean an easily readable software screen view. It would also serve as built in advertizing.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 1150
Anthony H | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 4 2011 6:35 PM

MJ. Smith:

Mark Smith:
I suspect there are quite a few users who never get far beyond what Logos dishes up when you type a verse into the Go box on the Home Page. Put it on the tools menu.
I think you're right. I also think that Logos ought to put some focus on serving the Sunday School teacher/Bible study leader by making the presentation of information "good enough" for projecting on a wall, I know that some professors use Logos in that manner and think it could be used a earlier levels. I'm not thinking full fledged presentation level, I mean an easily readable software screen view. It would also serve as built in advertizing.

Yes

Posts 1798
Tom | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 4 2011 6:38 PM

Anthony H:

MJ. Smith:

Mark Smith:
I suspect there are quite a few users who never get far beyond what Logos dishes up when you type a verse into the Go box on the Home Page. Put it on the tools menu.
I think you're right. I also think that Logos ought to put some focus on serving the Sunday School teacher/Bible study leader by making the presentation of information "good enough" for projecting on a wall, I know that some professors use Logos in that manner and think it could be used a earlier levels. I'm not thinking full fledged presentation level, I mean an easily readable software screen view. It would also serve as built in advertizing.

 

Yes

YesIdea

www.hombrereformado.org  Solo a Dios la Gloria   Apoyo

Posts 252
ROGER JIMENEZ | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Oct 5 2011 11:30 AM

At the end, I think that is the goal of dividing the Bible into verses and chapters. Compare, study, scrutinize. By putting a number of comments side-by-side, it is possible to "read" even the white spaces, in which some commentaries have nothing to say or have much to say. My vote is definitely a YES!

Posts 1667
Allen Browne | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 7 2011 5:08 PM

No problem for me if Logos provides this commentaries-in-parallel display, but I can't actually imagine using it.

The narrow panes side-by-side would not be a style I would enjoy reading. I would much perfer to immerse myself in the perspective of one commentator, and then another perspective afterwards rather than try to make sense of multiple perspecitves simultaneously.

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 7 2011 7:29 PM

Allen Browne:
The narrow panes side-by-side would not be a style I would enjoy reading.

The width is dependent upon the width or your screen and the number of study Bibles shown. Note the suggestion was with regards to study Bibles because commentaries often have long segments that must be read to follow the line of reasoning of the commentator. But I certainly agree that many would not find it useful. It truly depends upon what you are using Logos for.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 3707
Floyd Johnson | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 7 2011 7:42 PM

The recently published NLT Parallel Study Bible uses a format that may be helpful.  The top of each page has the NLT translation.  Underneath are two parallel columns - one with the NLT Study Bible notes, the other with the Life Application Study Bible notes.  I expect there could be three or four study bibles on the bottom.  Similarly, there could be three or four translations on top - or even include an original language version could be on top of each screen page.  

In the page that I have open, there are ten NLT verses with the corresponding notes from the NLT Study Bible and the Life Application Study Bible.  

Here is a sample LOGOS setup:

Blessings,
Floyd

Pastor-Patrick.blogspot.com

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 7 2011 7:52 PM

Floyd Johnson:
In the page that I have open, there are ten NLT verses with the corresponding notes from the NLT Study Bible and the Life Application Study Bible.  

That is a very workable solution.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 3707
Floyd Johnson | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 7 2011 7:58 PM

Now we just have to have the LIfe Application Study Bible available in LOGOS Smile.

Blessings,
Floyd

Pastor-Patrick.blogspot.com

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