Using Logos to do a Mechanical Layout

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Paul-C | Forum Activity | Posted: Thu, Oct 20 2011 5:12 AM

I'm new to Logos 4 (I have the Platinum Scholars base package) and am just about getting there with the basics. 

As part of my Masters degree, I need to do a mechanical layout on a passage from Colossians (i.e. breaking down the passage into the different constituent strands of the argument made by Paul.) I need to do something similar to the attached picture.

I know this is probably not the most difficult assignment I'll ever have to do, but if Logos can help me with it, it will be a useful "sanity-check" to make sure I'm on the right lines.  If Logos can help, I'd be very grateful for any and all pointers from you more experienced users!  Thanks. 

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Kevin Becker | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 20 2011 5:25 AM

If you want to create a layout like this in Logos you should use the Sentence Diagramming feature.

You might find the syntax graph resources and clause analysis resources helpful in breaking sentences down into their various parts

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Mark Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 20 2011 6:34 AM

As Kevin said there are some helps for what you are doing in Logos but they are in Greek not English. You didn't say whether that would be of any use to you. The  Lexham Clausal Outlines of the Greek New Testament would be of real help for checking your work if you can work in Greek. Logos does not have a similar resource in English.

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Frank Fenby | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 20 2011 6:41 AM

Paul Clarke:
I need to do a mechanical layout on a passage from Colossians

I am thrilled that others are doing mechanical layouts! I have been doing them for a number of years now, and have almost all of the epistles done. I did your book in 2007 using the NET Bible as the text. Be careful with the translation you use. Doing it in Greek is wonderful because the writer's detailed logic and rhythm of thoughthas not be compromised by translation. I find that NASB, NET and KJV work the best. I have not tried ESV. Some of my hermeneutics students tried using NIV but could not make it work. They were successful in NET and NASB. When done in Greek it is sometimes called "phrasing."

If you contact me via edifymin dot org, and tell me your passage, I will send you a copy of what I did.

 

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Paul-C | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 20 2011 10:58 AM

Thanks for your replies - they're much appreciated.  Unfortunately, I haven't taken the Greek classes on my MA just yet - but I'll be sure to have a play around with Logos' sentence diagramming tool to see what it can do for when I can use Greek!

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steve clark | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 20 2011 11:12 AM

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 20 2011 1:03 PM

Frank Fenby:
I am thrilled that others are doing mechanical layouts! I have been doing them for a number of years now, and have almost all of the epistles done.

When Logos has the sharing of PB's set up this would be something wonderful to share, even with a cost to compensate you for your work. If you're not comfortable making PB's, I be willing to create the .docx file with appropriate tagging for you. I like mechanical layouts (in a slightly different style) as a tool for liturgical readers to prepare a passage.

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Frank Fenby | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 20 2011 1:30 PM

MJ. Smith:
I like mechanical layouts (in a slightly different style) as a tool for liturgical readers to prepare a passage.

If you send me a message I will send you a sample to see if my format would be useful to you.

 

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George Somsel | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 20 2011 1:35 PM

Frank Fenby:
I am thrilled that others are doing mechanical layouts!

I couldn't get past welding the two metal plates together.  Mechanical layout?  What a strange name.

george
gfsomsel

יְמֵי־שְׁנוֹתֵינוּ בָהֶם שִׁבְעִים שָׁנָה וְאִם בִּגְבוּרֹת שְׁמוֹנִים שָׁנָה וְרָהְבָּם עָמָל וָאָוֶן

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Mark Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 20 2011 2:28 PM

George Somsel:
Mechanical layout? 

I think this is what I've heard called a structural diagram. In its own way that term isn't crystal clear either.

Pastor, North Park Baptist Church

Bridgeport, CT USA

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George Somsel | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 20 2011 2:50 PM

Mark Smith:

George Somsel:
Mechanical layout? 

I think this is what I've heard called a structural diagram. In its own way that term isn't crystal clear either.

Structural analysis is something to which we devoted considerable time and effort in OT form criticism when I was in grad school, but we did it in more of an outline format.

george
gfsomsel

יְמֵי־שְׁנוֹתֵינוּ בָהֶם שִׁבְעִים שָׁנָה וְאִם בִּגְבוּרֹת שְׁמוֹנִים שָׁנָה וְרָהְבָּם עָמָל וָאָוֶן

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 20 2011 3:36 PM

George Somsel:
Mechanical layout?

This is the common name I have heard for it - unlike block diagrams and flow diagrams you follow a mechanical set of rules to create them - not gut-feel or free form.

I've not heard them called structural diagrams, which to me implies a form of structuralism that isn't present. But then again I was in Graduate school when structuralism was all the rage and deconstruction was just beginning to get attention. Ah, the joys of academic fads.

I had not seen this particular version of a mechanical layout. I personally have a strong preference for the original form which uses only a vertical line (or arrow) and indentation ... no slanting lines or additional spaces which interrupt the visual field.

 

Logos4catholics Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Philana Crouch | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 20 2011 3:43 PM

Paul Clarke:

I'm new to Logos 4 (I have the Platinum Scholars base package) and am just about getting there with the basics. 

As part of my Masters degree, I need to do a mechanical layout on a passage from Colossians (i.e. breaking down the passage into the different constituent strands of the argument made by Paul.) I need to do something similar to the attached picture.

I know this is probably not the most difficult assignment I'll ever have to do, but if Logos can help me with it, it will be a useful "sanity-check" to make sure I'm on the right lines.  If Logos can help, I'd be very grateful for any and all pointers from you more experienced users!  Thanks. 

Check out Learn Logos there is specific webinar series that you can download on Sermon Preparation that deals with building a Biblical diagrams, he really explained how to use the clausal outlines, which looks to be what you were trying to do!

Blessings!

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 20 2011 4:06 PM

For those interested: http://blog.logos.com/2008/10/haddon_robinson_and_discourse_grammar_part_1/   (Steve Runge on mechanical drawings - sort of)

Logos4catholics Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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SteveF | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 20 2011 7:15 PM

George Somsel:
Mechanical layout?  What a strange name.

Mechanical layout was the name given to this method in my Bible College Hermeneutics/Bible Study Methods Course in the early 1970's.

 

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Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 20 2011 9:12 PM

Living and learning that lines can be added to a Text Flow diagram:

Thankful for Text Flow option: drag and drop words into desired place, then optionally add lines.

Keep Smiling Smile

Posts 6
John Bowman | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 27 2011 11:12 AM

I have been searching for this feature in Logos 4 to which I am new.  I cannot find the "syntax graph" or "clause analysis" resources.  Could you direct me to these areas?

Posts 6
John Bowman | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 27 2011 11:20 AM

Does using the Laxham Clausal Outlines require purchasing the Lexham Discourse Grammar NT?  I too am trying to do a Mechanical Layout in Greek as I learned it in seminary, and I am looking for help in determining the purpose of the dependent clauses according to their syntax.  Here is the type of result I am looking for.

3286.Mechanical Layout.docx

 

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Mark Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 27 2011 11:25 AM

John, I don't know if you have these but to find them type Lexham in your Library search window. Near the top are the Clausal Outlines and further down my list are the Syntactic resources:

 

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Mark Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 27 2011 11:28 AM

I just checked and find that these resources are in every base package from Original Languages on up.

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