What are you studying?

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Armwood | Forum Activity | Posted: Wed, Nov 23 2011 3:37 AM

I recently started to study the book of James in the NIV and soon found myself studying on the Holy Spirit. So, now  i'm  doing a double study.

Armwood

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Lynden Williams | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Nov 23 2011 6:16 AM

Hi armwood, how about outlining your method for the benefit of those who might be interested, like myself. Smile

Lynden Williams Communications https://www.lyndenwilliams.net 

Posts 85
Armwood | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Nov 23 2011 11:07 AM

Yes  Lynden , I do by studying in mostly english. My style fits me and while this is what works for me other might not like it.

1). the book ,Rread it thru in NIV and a smaller section in the KJV, Then i read the book introduction, looking at the auther from whom written and the time period , To whom he has written and the reason  and i try to look at the setting and the culture for in this the words will have there meaning spoken.

Then i pull the text apart verse by verse, over laying it with an interlinear, From english word to greek, english on top seeing i do not know greek, Using by word study tool in my scholar edt.   I look to understand what wh yand how these words written to them apply to there life and then i look to 2011/12 . last but noT lease i read and reread my commentaries.

This fits me. if something i can do better Please feel free to advise.  

 

Armwood

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Mike Childs | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Nov 23 2011 2:35 PM

I commend you for your serious study of God's Word.  It just blesses me when anyone seeks to study Scripture,

 

Your approach seems sound and somewhat inductive in approach in method, which is a very good thing.

 

I highly recommend Robert Traina's Mthodical Bible Study.  It changed my life.  Sadly, not in Logos yet.

"In all cases, the Church is to be judged by the Scripture, not the Scripture by the Church," John Wesley

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Josh | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Nov 23 2011 5:39 PM

Both of these books are on Logos and have been very helpful with my inductive Bible studying. They are not difficult to read and they include great after chapter assignments to help hone your abilities. If I had to choose just one I'd pick the first book.

http://www.logos.com/product/9374/grasping-gods-word-a-hands-on-approach-to-reading-interpreting-and-applying-the-bible

http://www.logos.com/product/5442/preaching-gods-word

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Allen Browne | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Nov 23 2011 6:39 PM

armwood:
1). the book ,Rread it thru in NIV and a smaller section in the KJV, Then i read the book introduction, looking at the auther from whom written and the time period , To whom he has written and the reason  and i try to look at the setting and the culture for in this the words will have there meaning spoken.

Then i pull the text apart verse by verse, over laying it with an interlinear, From english word to greek, english on top seeing i do not know greek, Using by word study tool in my scholar edt.   I look to understand what wh yand how these words written to them apply to there life and then i look to 2011/12 . last but noT lease i read and reread my commentaries.

Armwood, that's a good approach: reading the whole thing through to get the big picture first is crucial.

Your subject line asks how we do it, so I assume you want us to tell what we do. My approach is normally something like this:

  1. Listen to the whole book through (MP3) while driving to/from work. For a short book like James, I'd probably listen through 4 or 5 times over a few days to get the flow of the book.
  2. During that listening process, read the introduction to the book from commentaries: author and date, recipients, cultural setting, and outline.
  3. Combining 1 and 2, decide how I would break the book up (my outline of the big picture of what James is saying).
  4. Concentrate on the first section from my outline. Re-read that several times, and divide it into the key thoughts (bearing in mind that the opening thoughts may be dealt with in more detail later in the book).
  5. In some books, discourse analysis helps here. In the NT letters (esp. Paul), sentence diagramming (Cascadia graphs) may help get the connections between the thoughts (flow).
  6. Identify other sources the author may have used (typically OT passages) to derive these thoughts. Commentaries and journals help here.
  7. Identify how the original readers would have received those thoughts. For me, word studies come in here (i.e. I only do heavy study into specific words once I've identified crucial words that may be unclear, or that could have meant something different for them than it does for us).
  8. Repeat steps 4 - 7 for the next section, and so on through  the book.
  9. Frame that understanding of the text within the entire Biblical narrative (how it relates to Jesus and God's purpose for creation).
  10. Meditate on application: what it means (and what it does not mean) in our time and culture, grappling particularly with things that could cause me to misapply it (e.g. the consumerism and individualism of my postmodern culture).
  11. Put the sections I studied back together again as a whole, and identify the big themes within the whole book.

It's never quite as watertightly structured as that, and (like you) I do run off on other themes during the process. But that's essentially how I go about it.

A crucial aspect is not to get so bogged down in analysing the details that you miss synthesising the whole again (steps 9-11).

Hope that's helpful.

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Lynden Williams | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Nov 23 2011 7:22 PM

Thanks armwood and Allen.

Lynden Williams Communications https://www.lyndenwilliams.net 

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