If money was not a big problem...

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Taxee | Forum Activity | Posted: Mon, Dec 19 2011 12:24 PM

Someone gave me a very basic Libronix package (Pastor's package?) a few years ago which I finally upgraded to Logos4 this past summer.

It wasn't very long until I upgraded to the platinum base package to which I have also added the following, among other things (mostly because they were on sale or pre-pub):

Boice's Expositional Commentaries
Nelson Bible Reference Bundle
NICOT/NICNT
Welwyn Commentary Series
Baker Theology Collection
Essential Reference Bundle
Lenski's Commentary on the New Testament
Barth's Church Dogmatics
Calvin's Commentaries (46 vols.)

I am going to have some spare time on my hands in the next few year's during which it is my intention to start learning Greek.

I have considered going to the Portfolio package but I really don't think it's great value.  I want to end up with a top quality library for doing Bible study (and to help with research for speaking) but don't want to spend a lot of money in the future.  So, I am looking to add the following before year end to get in on the Christmas sale (based on comments I have read in this forum):

Hermeneia and Continental Commentaries
Anchor Yale Bible
Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

I has also heard that the following are good but not sure they are worth the extra cost:

Tyndale Commentaries
The Bible Speaks Today: New Testament (22 vols.)

I also am an active participant in the CP program.

I value the opinion of the learned participants in this forum and would appreciate any advice you might have whether I am missing anything critical or whether any of the above might be overkill (while money is not a big issue, I also know the importance of good stewardship).

Thanks!

Smile

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Mark Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 19 2011 2:02 PM

I would add Grammatical Analysis of the Greek NT, the IVP Essential Reference Library, LSJ (if you got the Perseus collection, both if you didn't), The New International Dictionary of New Testament Theology, The Exegetical Summary series, a good grammar (like Wallace's), The Anchor-Yale Dictionary, and Baker Exegetical. Personally I don't gain much from Hermeneia/Continental nor from the Anchor-Yale Bible. You don't need Tyndale, and I think Hughes' Preaching the Word series is a better (but less complete) expository series than BST.

 

Pastor, North Park Baptist Church

Bridgeport, CT USA

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Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 19 2011 2:09 PM

I won't speak to your question (though your list is certainly top quality, everyone's values being applied as needed). But I will say whatever you decide, you'd do well to call sales. They're definitely leaning forward this Christmas (just  a hint).

Which by the way, your name always reminds me of Enoch! (that's a complement)


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Mark Barnes | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 19 2011 2:28 PM

Hi Taxee,

It's hard to make a recommendation without knowing your own theological leanings. Based on your existing purchases, you're more likely to find Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary, Baker Exegetical Commentary, Tyndale and BST Commentaries valueable than you are Hermeneia/Continental and Anchor Yale Bible.

I was asked to do a buyers guide for an evangelical seminary recently. Here's my "other useful resources" section, minus the resources you already own. If you're not upgrading to portfolio, the most useful resources you'll miss are HALOT and Liddell-Scott lexicons, together with ISBE. They're all worth considering, but they wouldn't be a first-line choice (unless your Hebrew is half-decent, in which case you'll want HALOT).

Commentaries

  • The Bible Speaks Today - an excellent intermediate series. Excellent value.
  • Tyndale Commentaries - one of the best intermediate evangelical sets. Covers OT & NT. Good value.
  • Preaching the Word Collection - very good series designed for preachers. Full of application and illustration. Many volumes by R. Kent Hughes. 19 vols.
  • Calvin's Commentaries - all 46 volumes of Calvin's commentaries. Old, but still very well worth reading. £96.
  • Baker Exegetical Commentary on the NT - another excellent evangelical academic set. £122 for 8 volumes (though that's still much cheaper than in print).
  • NIV Application Commentary - an excellent set, particularly helpful in sermon prep as it covers the original meaning, timeless principles and contemporary application. NT, 20 vols. OT Prophets, 8 vols, £100.
  • Zondervan Illustrated Bible Background Commentary - excellent and almost unique. Points out very useful background information in every chapter of the Bible. Full of photographs, though regrettably expensive. NT, 4 vols. OT, 5 vols.
  • Lloyd-Jones' Exposition of Ephesians - transcriptions of his sermons. 8 volumes.
  • Focus on the Bible Commentaries - Christian Focus' answer to Welwyn. Includes several volumes from Dale Ralph Davis. Rather pricey. 32 volumes.
  • Complete Charles Spurgeon Collection - all 63 volumes of the Metropolitan Tabernacle and New Park Street Pulpits.
  • IVP NT Commentary - similar level to BST. Equally evangelical, though not quite as helpful nor as good value. 18 vols.
  • Baker's NT Commentary - from Hendrikson and Kistemaker. Solid, reformed, but sometimes uninspiring. 12 volumes.
  • Additions to commentary sets
    Several new volumes have recently been added to most commentary sets, including NAC, BECNT, Pillar and NICOT/NICNT. They're not yet included in the base packages or collections so if you want everything that's available you have to buy the extra volumes.

Dictionaries

  • Essential IVP Reference Collection - fantastic collection of IVP dictionaries, with a genuine claim to be essential. Budget for this if you can. 2 volumes of OT dictionaries are available separately.
  • Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary - the most comprehensive Bible dictionary. Not evangelical, so not every article is useful, but it's consistently excellent on people/places, and often good elsewhere. 6 volumes.
  • NIDNTT and NIDOTTE - very good theological and exegetical dictionaries. NIDNTT is similar to TDNT and EDNT, but NIDOTTE has no major competitor (at least until TDOT is finished, and gets much cheaper). NIDNTT is 4 vols, NIDOTTE is 5 vols.

Theological Journals

  • Theological Journal Library - can be very useful for essay-writing and some post-grad work. Volumes 1-10 includes Westminster Theological Journal, JETS and many others (500 years worth!). There's no better way to access these journals once you've left seminary. A further 4 volumes are available, adding - among others - 50 years of the Tyndale Bulletin.
  • Themelios (1975-2008) - 99 issues of this evangelical journal for students.
  • Journal of Biblical Literature - could be useful for postgrads. 26 vols.

Other sets possibly useful for postgrads

Logos offer the Hermeneia, ICC and Anchor Commentaries, which won't help evangelical preachers over much, but may be useful academically. Both the Babylonian and Jerusalem Talmuds are available (Neusner's translation) as is the Göttingen Septuagint. There are lots of JSOT and JSNT supplements, Barth's Church Dogmatics, and many volumes from Sheffield Academic Press, T & T Clark, Zondervan, Eerdmans, IVP, Baker and other academic publishers.

Other authors you might look out for

Many well-known authors have collections of their books in Logos. These include (in no particular order): John MacArthur, N. T. Wright, John Piper, Martyn Lloyd-Jones, John Owen, Jonathan Edwards, A. W. Tozer, Max Lucado, Warren Wiersbe, Cornelius van Til, Norman Geisler, John Owen, Don Carson, Thomas Goodwin, Richard Baxter and Louis Berkhof.

 

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Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 19 2011 2:32 PM

Taxee:
I am going to have some spare time on my hands in the next few year's during which it is my intention to start learning Greek.

Noticed Greek New Testament Discourse Bundle (9 vols.) is included in => Essential New Testament Bundle (50 vols.) and => Essential Biblical Studies Bundle that has Socio-Rhetorical commentaries.

Couple video series to consider:

Learn to Use Biblical Greek and Hebrew with Logos Bible Software

Introducing New Testament Discourse Grammar: Video Series

 

For Hebrew, hoping for more pre-publication orders => Lexham Discourse Hebrew Bible Bundle (6 vols.)

Keep Smiling Smile

Posts 170
Taxee | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 19 2011 3:47 PM

Mark Barnes:
It's hard to make a recommendation without knowing your own theological leanings.


Theological leanings?  Conservative - the Lausanne Covenant with a charismatic slant would probably best describe me.  The detailed concepts of reformed theology are rather new to me but I am finding it quite fascinating.  I probably sit in the middle of the road on a lot of issues and enjoying exploring both sides of positions (e.g. I'm probably somewhere in between hard core Calvinism and Arminianism - I'm dispensationalist but currently looking at the a-mill point of view).

I have never attended seminary but have spent my entire career in the professional/business world.  I went through a rather painful church split a couple of years ago (over ethical issues) which  left me re-examining a lot of my basic beliefs.  This in turn led to a painful realization of how little I actually know about theology (It's real hard to get too focused on theology when you travel 125-150K miles a year and generally work 12 hour days)... but I have a fairly good knowledge of the KJV Bible  Wink

I have now made a decision to slow down on the business side of things (semi-retirement is the wrong word as I expect to be very engaged in other pursuits including the study of the scriptures).  Hence the reason for my request. I want to spend at least one day a week studying scriptures/learning Greek/researching various topics using Logos.  I actually put together a textual research system back about 20 years ago so am very comfortable with the boolean algebra-type searching that one can do in Logos.

Thanks again for your suggestions!

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Philana Crouch | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 19 2011 3:53 PM

Others have mentioned the IVP Essential (the NT Dictionaries are excellent) I would also add the IVP OT Dictionaries, and as if you don't have it the newer ISBE.

Blessings,

Philana

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Mark Barnes | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 19 2011 4:17 PM

Taxee:
Theological leanings?  Conservative - the Lausanne Covenant with a charismatic slant would probably best describe me.  The detailed concepts of reformed theology are rather new to me but I am finding it quite fascinating.  I probably sit in the middle of the road on a lot of issues and enjoying exploring both sides of positions (e.g. I'm probably somewhere in between hard core Calvinism and Arminianism - I'm dispensationalist but currently looking at the a-mill point of view).

Then my comments above would be relevant, I think. I'm sure others will chip in with their own suggestions, too.

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 19 2011 6:01 PM

Taxee:
Theological leanings?  Conservative - the Lausanne Covenant with a charismatic slant would probably best describe me. 

I'd suggest that you look at the pre-seminary reading list or the "suggested library" for seminaries that you respect. They usually gibe you a decent overview of positions and history as well as the particular theological position.

Logos4catholics Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 170
Taxee | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 20 2011 8:05 AM

MJ. Smith:
I'd suggest that you look at the pre-seminary reading list or the "suggested library" for seminaries that you respect.

Having spent most of my adult life in a very insular church (read - "we're right and everyone else is wrong"), I really don't have a seminary that I respect.  In fact, I really don't know of many seminaries.  As I said in a prior post, I have recently come to a realization of how little I actually know. 

A friend sent me Philip Cary's lecture series on the History of Christian Theology which started to open my eyes to things that I had been taught but had no appreciation of where they came from.  For example, the church I went to believed in the sovereignty of the local church.  However, I had no clue that this was the congregationalist governance model which arose from the nonconformist movement during the Puritan reformation of the Church of England. Once you know where something came from, you can go back and examine the roots of the teaching, its Biblical (or non-biblical) foundations, and other alternatives to that specific issue.

I am a bit like a kid in a candy shop with my purchase of the platinum package 4 months ago and my subsequent additions.  As a result, my focus has rapidly shifted away from business and I knew that I needed to take a significant amount of time off from work to really sort out what i believed.  That's where I am today.

I can't say that I am married to a specific set of beliefs and am more interested in well-written thoughtful works than things that follow my admittedly narrow belief set.

Thanks again for everyone's advice.

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NB.Mick | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 20 2011 10:27 AM

Taxee:

Someone gave me a very basic Libronix package (Pastor's package?) a few years ago which I finally upgraded to Logos4 this past summer.

It wasn't very long until I upgraded to the platinum base package to which I have also added the following, among other things (mostly because they were on sale or pre-pub):

Boice's Expositional Commentaries
Nelson Bible Reference Bundle
NICOT/NICNT
Welwyn Commentary Series
Baker Theology Collection
Essential Reference Bundle
Lenski's Commentary on the New Testament
Barth's Church Dogmatics
Calvin's Commentaries (46 vols.)

I am going to have some spare time on my hands in the next few year's during which it is my intention to start learning Greek.

I have considered going to the Portfolio package but I really don't think it's great value.  I want to end up with a top quality library for doing Bible study (and to help with research for speaking) but don't want to spend a lot of money in the future.  So, I am looking to add the following before year end to get in on the Christmas sale (based on comments I have read in this forum):

Hermeneia and Continental Commentaries
Anchor Yale Bible
Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

I has also heard that the following are good but not sure they are worth the extra cost:

Tyndale Commentaries
The Bible Speaks Today: New Testament (22 vols.)

I also am an active participant in the CP program.

I value the opinion of the learned participants in this forum and would appreciate any advice you might have whether I am missing anything critical or whether any of the above might be overkill (while money is not a big issue, I also know the importance of good stewardship).

I think I can relate a lot to what you tell about your situation and plans (no, not "been there, done that", rather "finding myself in the struggles of starting it myself" but will likely need to keep working for money some years to come...). And you have collected an impressive library already. This having said: If your first aim is rather "faith seeking understanding", coming to grips with your existing beliefs and a conservative outlook on theology, then you propably won't need any of the resources listed by you. From what I read in the forums it seems that AYB(D) and Hermeneia may go more into a liberal and scholarly direction. If I had the funds, I'd choose Baker - but it might duplicate a bit what you have in the NICOT/NT and WBC series. Then again, if money wasn't a big problem, I'd go for Baker and the Pre-Pub update as well, as they seem to bring excellent scholarship... Coming from a slightly different angle and (if I didn't overlook) not yet in your list are the socio-rhetorical commentaries (Ben Witherington III) - maybe you check one out and decide whether to go for a bundle. I personally like them, but don't find them to be totally different to other commentraies, but maybe I haven't worked enough with them.

Actually Tyndale is my "go-to" modern full-bible commentary set - it is not too much per passage and I like it, but again, there may be some overlap with what you already have.

BST is cheaper than what we discussed so far, and therefore the extra cost is not that much. Unfortunately, Logos carries only the NT. But if you refer to Lausanne of all possible theological leanings, the BST should be a must for its editor and main contributor John Stott.... Overall, it's a bit more "pastoral" than the big sets (but then again your Welwyn set seems to be much more so, judging only from the product page). I must admit I'm a Stott-fan. I bought BST even though I have much of it in paper. Too bad that there is no "20 bucks John Stott Lifeworks eBible" (actually BST and the Letters of John in Tyndale's Commentary are all that is available in Logos from him Crying )  But BST is really good.

Wishing you all the best,

Mick

 

running Logos 5.3 Beta 2 (Verbum Master+, Lutheran Silver) on Acer Extensa 5230E with 4GB RAM & 250GB SSD - Win7 Home 32bit & Android apps on Kindle Fire

Posts 6457
Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 20 2011 10:57 AM

'Newbie' Mick ... it's becoming progressively more obvious you're intentionally misleading the forum members with your 'Newbie'. I notice you leff it off your above comment, probably getting used to going 'naked' as they say in the furniture and investment banking businesses. Just joking.

But I disagree (a little). Everyone kind of 'self-classifies' themselves. I view myself as far-(far)-right of my evangelical believers at the two churches I attend. But on the other hand I prefer commentaries like Hermeneia or Anchor or WBC. The reason is I like to work from the Bible 'outwards' and don't like commentaries that begin with theological assumptions, no matter their theology. In other words, I want to see lots of 'evidence' (Thomas-onian!).  I guess in a sense I agree with George to read the text and go from there.

But that said, I understand your points.

 


Posts 441
Alexander | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 20 2011 11:04 AM

Mark Barnes:

  • NIDNTT and NIDOTTE - very good theological and exegetical dictionaries. NIDNTT is similar to TDNT and EDNT, but NIDOTTE has no major competitor (at least until TDOT is finished, and gets much cheaper). NIDNTT is 4 vols, NIDOTTE is 5 vols.

 

Why do I not see NIDNNT, NIDOTTE, or a pre-pub/community price for TDOT for Logos?

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NB.Mick | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 20 2011 11:49 AM

Denise Barnhart:
'Newbie' Mick ... it's becoming progressively more obvious you're intentionally misleading the forum members with your 'Newbie'.

well.... if I were to follow the words of a sophisticated forum member, I should start to consider a new nick - say in 2016 or so...

Denise Barnhart:
I'm a 'newbie' compared to others on the forum; I 'joined' in 2006.

(from http://community.logos.com/forums/t/41364.aspx ) - too good to not quote here Cool

Denise Barnhart:
I prefer commentaries like Hermeneia or Anchor or WBC. The reason is I like to work from the Bible 'outwards' and don't like commentaries that begin with theological assumptions, no matter their theology.

Hm. I think I see where you're coming from, but I think I'll differ. Theological assumptions underly all commentaries, including liberal ones. And IMHO the groundwork established in the "Introduction" regarding authorship, date, situation of writing, redactions etc. will  inevitably set the stage for the detailed commentary later on. One may still learn from commentaries that take a very different position in this area, but it gets tedious. 

I believe also conservative commentaries claim that they read the text and go from there - but in a sense they sometimes are working on a different plane altogether, which means that the questions raised and discussed and the results that can be achieved may be totally different.

However, I'm not going to argue this dogmatically (or in any way comparable to the Isaiah-thread you hinted at)  - everybody builds their own library and chooses their own way of study. After all, this forum is about different people bringing different perspectives to the table - and in this thread, Taxee is free to regard or disregard the advice and mere subjective opinions posted (as a newbie, my comments are the latter rather than the former Wink  .

Denise Barnhart:

But that said, I understand your points.

Thank you. It's good to have the possibility to exchange our views.

Mick

running Logos 5.3 Beta 2 (Verbum Master+, Lutheran Silver) on Acer Extensa 5230E with 4GB RAM & 250GB SSD - Win7 Home 32bit & Android apps on Kindle Fire

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Praiser | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 20 2011 11:53 AM

Alexander Longacre:

Mark Barnes:

  • NIDNTT and NIDOTTE - very good theological and exegetical dictionaries. NIDNTT is similar to TDNT and EDNT, but NIDOTTE has no major competitor (at least until TDOT is finished, and gets much cheaper). NIDNTT is 4 vols, NIDOTTE is 5 vols.

 

Why do I not see NIDNNT, NIDOTTE, or a pre-pub/community price for TDOT for Logos?

http://www.logos.com/product/5463/new-international-dictionary-of-new-testament-theology

http://www.logos.com/product/5465/new-international-dictionary-of-old-testament-theology-and-exegesis

 

 

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Mark Barnes | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 20 2011 11:59 AM

Alexander Longacre:
Why do I not see NIDNNT, NIDOTTE, or a pre-pub/community price for TDOT for Logos?

We don't know whether TDOT will be made available for Logos yet.

NIDNNT and NIDOTTE are here:

 

Posts 441
Alexander | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 20 2011 12:11 PM

Thank you both for your links. Apparently the abreviations didn't work for my search results :(

Posts 1901
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 20 2011 1:10 PM

Day dreaming here, but if money wasn't a problem I'd get:

1.  NICOT/NICNT

2.  Nelson's Reference Bundle

3.  Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary

4.  Hermeneia 

5.  NIDOTTE

6.  Exegetical Commentary Bundle (Though I could really care less about the IVP NT Commentary)

7.  NT Studies Bundle & Hebrew Bible Bundle

8.  Focus on the Bible Commentaries

9.  Interpretation Commentaries

10.  Interpreters Bible Commentary & Dictionary

Phew!!! There's my humble list! I'll eventually get some of those as finances permit...Smile

Happy Holidays!

DAL

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 20 2011 4:13 PM

Taxee:
A friend sent me Philip Cary's lecture series on the History of Christian Theology

Although it is stuck in prepub and is sometimes a bit biased, Harnack's History of Dogma is a must read. And, of course, Pelikan is usually a good bet (although he's not in Logos).

Logos4catholics Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Lynden Williams | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 20 2011 5:08 PM

Everything here that I did not own. http://www.logos.com/products/search?Genre=Biblical+Studies

Everything ever written or spoken in Religion, formatted for Logos Bible Software. Logos Youtube Channel

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