CP Price Restucturing

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Dave Moser | Forum Activity | Posted: Thu, Jan 26 2012 10:50 AM

When a product in Community Pricing makes an obvious peak can the price brackets be adjusted for both:

1. A smaller range
2. Finer price increments

Example: The Classic Commentaries and Studies on Ephesians currently looks like this:

It's pretty obvious that it's not going to go through at a the high end of the scale. So why is the high end even there any more?

It also doesn't look like it will go through at the next lowest price point of $30. However if there were an intermediate bid point - say, $35 - there might be enough interest to move the peak down and entice more bidders.

The set-it-and-forget-it CP price scales seem unhelpful.

Posts 465
Dave Moser | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 3 2012 6:56 AM

To illustrate this point further, take today's three closings:

Each of these resources could have gone for $5 less if Logos had chosen to simply restructure the price brackets. It would have saved customers money and potentially attracted new bidders drawn in by the lower price.

Posts 1523
Josh | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 3 2012 8:15 AM

I agree.

Logos should adjust the final price amount on what it took to get to 100%. If the winning bid amount is more than 120% than the bidders have OVER PAID by 20%. This needs to be given back to the bidders, not into Logos pocket.

Posts 452
Mitchell | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 3 2012 8:34 AM

I think this is a little much to ask. Community Pricing is already pretty generous, and it takes some time for people to wrap their heads around the system as it is. Doing something like this would be a big development effort, would increase the system's complexity, and would only yield a few dollars in savings for us bidders.

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Ken McGuire | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 3 2012 8:47 AM

mitchellisdumb:

I think this is a little much to ask. Community Pricing is already pretty generous, and it takes some time for people to wrap their heads around the system as it is. Doing something like this would be a big development effort, would increase the system's complexity, and would only yield a few dollars in savings for us bidders.

I agree.  There have been times when Logos has adjusted the scale to make things make sense, but as much as I am a greedy person who wants to pay 5 bucks less for things, the system as it exists now is both plenty generous and complex enough that some users don't understand it.

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Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 3 2012 8:54 AM

They do sometimes readjust the scales, and sometimes they don't get around to it. They're pretty busy with other things, and if they're getting enough bids to cover the price of production on these, that has already met their goals. Going beyond that to tweaking the intervals so that more people can get them at the ridiculously low prices would be nice, but if they don't have time to do that, I can understand it.

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Matthew C Jones | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 3 2012 9:26 AM

Kenneth McGuire:
 
mitchellisdumb:
 I think this is a little much to ask. Community Pricing is already pretty generous, and it takes some time for people to wrap their heads around the system as it is. Doing something like this would be a big development effort, would increase the system's complexity, and would only yield a few dollars in savings for us bidders.  
 I agree.  There have been times when Logos has adjusted the scale to make things make sense, but as much as I am a greedy person who wants to pay 5 bucks less for things, the system as it exists now is both plenty generous and complex enough that some users don't understand it.  

Guys, I don't think you are looking at this the way it was intended.  Heaven forbid the Revelation set actually peaks at $160!   If it did, should Logos drop the price because the profit margin was "too high?"   Of course not. Logos designed the Community Pricing program so the user community could drive the prices by getting behind the effort. It is a partnership of sorts.

Bob has said he can produce books for $1 per title if everybody bought one. But even if everybody did bid on a book we can't have it at $1 when the lowest price on the graph is $10 or $20. And what determines if the bid increments are $5 or $10 or $20?  I don't believe there is any difficulty in programming $5 increments over $10. The "10" format takes one extra keystroke. Surprise

Logos can offer $5 increments and Logos can change the graphs. They have done both before.as mentioned,  Wouldn't it be better to just do it that way the first time since they are too busy to get around to it later? If the whole process is "supply and demand" driven, imagine what the response would be when the Revelation set leaves Community Pricing at $160, goes to a $240 Pre-Pub price, graduates to a $360 retail price and is on Black Friday sale for $119.95.......    Free Market economics. Big Smile

It is not greedy to ask that the program be allowed to function as advertised. 

 

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Friedrich | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 3 2012 9:34 AM

I resonate with the concerns of those who are thinking of the Logos employees and all their competing demands.

At the same time I had similar thoughts to Supertramp as I read through all the posts:

Super Tramp:
Logos can offer $5 increments and Logos can change the graphs. They have done both before.as mentioned,  Wouldn't it be better to just do it that way the first time since they are too busy to get around to it later?

Is asking Logos to do that asking them to do extra work?  Yes.  Is it too much?  I am not inclined to make that judgment call.  I think asking for $5 increments is fine.  They might even be able to create an equation (or algorhithm or whatever it is programmers do) to automatically kick in depending ont he price: if it drops below 15 dollars (for example) then kick in $1 increments.

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Matthew C Jones | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 3 2012 9:51 AM

Dan DeVilder:
Is asking Logos to do that asking them to do extra work?  Yes.  Is it too much?  I am not inclined to make that judgment call.  I think asking for $5 increments is fine.  They might even be able to create an equation (or algorhithm or whatever it is programmers do)

This type of effort is trivial compared to what the programmers are used to doing. I suspect the triviality is one reason it doesn't get done. It is like making your grocery store manager sack groceries when he holds an MBA  The $5 minimum still prevents Bob's $1 per title example from ever happening.  

All that said, the Community Pricing program creates the best prices we can get and everyone should seriously consider participating.  (That last statement excludes all the many free books Logos gives to us. What will they do next? Pay us $1 to accept a book? That would make the evening news!)

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Michael G. Halpern | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 3 2012 10:33 AM

Yes

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Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 3 2012 3:55 PM

Posted => Suggestion: Community Pricing Closure Bidding since I would like Logos to adjust increment between community pricing bid amounts after enough Logos users have placed enough bids to cover estimated production costs.  Personally have seen several community pricing items that had many additional bids, but not enough to reduce amount from initial closing.  Three resources today had $ 10 increments; if increment had been changed to $ 5, closing amount would have been $ 5 less for all bidders of three resources that closed earlier today, whose current pre-pub prices are now more than triple closing amount.

From a business perspective, can appreciate Logos lacking incentive to reduce increment amounts (e.g. $ 10) since larger amount needs more community bidders for closure price reduction.  Hence Logos has some "profit" potential if lower increment is not achieved, which can help pay for software development and sync server usage fees (i.e. network access for lots of users around the clock), ...

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Andrew Baguley | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Feb 14 2012 10:27 AM

I think Travel through Bible Lands is going to be yet another example of this.  The current bidding graph looks a little silly, with all the bidding sitting so far to the left.  http://www.logos.com/product/8557/travels-through-bible-lands-collection  

I suspect that smaller increments would generate enough interest to push it down to the next price bracket, which it's unlikely to do at the moment, with potential bidders seeing little chance of movement, so no point in bidding.  That said, perhaps this isn't the most popular resource to make the point with, even if the current saving is showing at 96%.  What is the record for biggest percentage saving so far?

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fgh | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 17 2012 8:13 AM

Andrew Baguley:
the current saving is showing at 96%.  What is the record for biggest percentage saving so far?

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Posts 579
Andrew Baguley | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 18 2012 2:25 AM

Yes, fgh.  I have to admit that I only thought of this after I asked the question.  However, some of the biggest savings were probably on pre-pub, or more likely still community pricing, so they're no longer displayed, as the prices have since risen.

Anyone remember any massive bargains that even beat the ones fgh has displayed?

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