Logos 4 home page and ribbon.

Page 1 of 3 (44 items) 1 2 3 Next >
This post has 43 Replies | 0 Followers

Posts 6
Jim L | Forum Activity | Posted: Fri, Nov 20 2009 5:51 AM

Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

I want to thank Logos for providing the ability to turn off the home Page.

One would hope that they would offer the same option for the ribbon.

Can you believe they have placed a catholic lectionary on the ribbon?

Catholics don’t read the bible.

 

Posts 8608
TCBlack | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 20 2009 6:12 AM

James Luzadder:

Can you believe they have placed a catholic lectionary on the ribbon?

Catholics don’t read the bible.

Catholics do read the bible, I have a very nice catholic family down the road and we converse regularly, The mother is certainly more theologically accurate regarding the person of Christ than many "evangelicals" I meet.

Also: the catholic lectionary on the ribbon can be superseded by prioritizing another lectionary in your library.

EDITED.

Truth Is Still Truth Even if You Don't Believe It

Check the Wiki

Warning: Sarcasm is my love language. I may inadvertently express my love to you.

Posts 4508
Robert Pavich | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 20 2009 6:18 AM

Unless I miss my guess....Damian reads the bible...Hmm

 

also being serious;

Is this "Catholic" in the early church sense OR Roman Catholic?

Robert Pavich

For help go to the Wiki: http://wiki.logos.com/Table_of_Contents__

Posts 2319
Forum MVP
John Fidel | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 20 2009 6:46 AM

I normally would not reply to a post like this, however, my father was a Catholic and studied the Bible in depth daily. He passed a couple of years ago. Condescending remarks such as this are inappropriate. I suggest you edit your post or people may think that even though you read your Bible you fail to understand what it says.

Posts 4508
Robert Pavich | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 20 2009 6:51 AM

I have to say that I made a joke and tried to be nice to make my point but John is right...that's not appropriate.

 

Brother....blanket statements just don't work and this one needs to be jettisoned.

Robert Pavich

For help go to the Wiki: http://wiki.logos.com/Table_of_Contents__

Posts 931
Bill Moore | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 20 2009 7:43 AM

James Luzadder:

 

Catholics don’t read the bible.

 

Perhaps that statement was made with tongue firmly planted in cheek, poking fun at a stereotype. If so, an emoticon would have been helpful. If it's a serious comment (and I can't really believe it is), it needs to be deleted.

Bill

Pastor, Cornerstone Baptist Church, Clinton, SC

Posts 2212
Damian McGrath | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 20 2009 2:13 PM

James Luzadder:
Catholics don’t read the bible.

It may, in fact, be fair to say that a large number of Catholics don't read the bible.

Many Catholics in the developing world are illiterate!

Many Catholics in the developed world have never developed a devotional life revolving around reading the Bible...

But, like our forebears, every Catholic hears the word of God and is devoted to the Word (Catholicism is not a religion of the Book it is a religion dedicated to the Person of Christ - it is He who is our measure and guide).

For those interested in how much of the Bible Catholics listen too over the course of the 3 year lectional cycle: http://catholic-resources.org/Lectionary/Statistics.htm

Posts 28963
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 20 2009 4:49 PM

James Luzadder:

Can you believe they have placed a catholic lectionary on the ribbon?

Catholics don’t read the bible.

I hate to break this to you but Lutherans are tops in the use of Scripture in worship and Roman rite Catholics are a close second (some Eastern Catholic rites and Orthodox churches beat out the Lutherans but are not common in the U.S.). The so-called "Bible churches" don't even come close. Yes, I can believe that Logos placed lectionaries in the ribbon - consider the percentage of Christians and Jews who fall under these terms: Catholic, Orthodox, Eastern, Jewish, Lutheran, Anglican, and for the RCL: A number of Protestant churches have also adopted (and sometimes adapted) the RCL. In the United States of America this includes the Disciples of Christ, the Christian Fellowship of the Unitarian Universalist Association, the Presbyterian Church USA, the Reformed Church in America, the United Church of Christ, the United Methodist Church, the Community of Christ, and the American Baptist Churches, USA, among others. In Canada the list includes  the United Church of Canada. In the United Kingdom this includes the Methodist Church, the United Reformed Church, the Church in Wales, and the Church of Scotland (Presbyterian) and in Korea .. Australia ... etc. ... and I can't blame Logos for the fact that in their limited lectionary resources "C" for Catholic happened to fall first alphabetically. Catholics may not have a tradition of methodically reading the Bible in sequence, cover-to-cover but they certainly do read and hear the Bible.

Once you've gotten over the shock of that reply, consider how long Scriptures were passed on solely by means of the Catholics, Orthodox and Eastern Church monks hand copying the text.

Sorry for ragging on you but the number of times this has come up is riduculous.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 28963
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 21 2009 12:14 AM

Damian McGrath:
Many Catholics in the developing world are illiterate!

In the Middle Ages there were "Pauper's Bibles" - basically pictures to tell the story with enough words to keep the person able to read the words on track. Also in the Middle Ages churches in Southern Italy had their walls painted in frescos ... which if you knew the order to "read" them told the story of salvation. In most Byzantine and Slavic Orthodox churches (and there corresponding Uniate churches) the iconstasis at the front of the church has icons of the major events in Jesus' life in chronological order. Point: being literate in terms of being able to read, is not a prerequsite to knowing the Scriptures. And the idea of reading silently, i.e. not to the household, came after the invention of chimneys.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 2212
Damian McGrath | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 21 2009 1:34 AM

MJ. Smith:
Point: being literate in terms of being able to read, is not a prerequsite to knowing the Scriptures. And the idea of reading silently, i.e. not to the household, came after the invention of chimneys.

Obviously, I know this Martha. I just spent two weeks with a priest from rural Ghana who was describing how different it is to live in an area where most people cannot read (and they don't have fresco adorned churches). They tend to preach for longer. There are very long catechesis sessions after Mass in which the scripture stories are told and expounded upon. People come together during the week to hear the word and to reflect upon it.

Posts 28963
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 21 2009 2:24 AM

Damian McGrath:
Obviously, I know this Martha.

I trusted that you knew it ... but much of the misunderstandings are, as you pointed out, based on the assumption that Christians must be literate ... not literally, but assuming that Bible knowledge which comes from Bible study which requires reading the Bible. I'll admit also to being a little peeved that the Logos lime line for the History of Engliish Bibles excluded Old and Middle English translations - something that is misleading when it comes to Catholics and the Bible. If it were labeled something like "English translations: from Wycliffe on" or  "Printed English translations" ... so I guess we'll call this my grumpy night.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 2212
Damian McGrath | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 21 2009 2:36 AM

MJ. Smith:
I trusted that you knew it ..

I was fairly sure that you were just using my line as a launch pad....

Posts 4508
Robert Pavich | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 21 2009 3:17 AM

So can we drop the initial blanket insult from this thread? Embarrassed

Robert Pavich

For help go to the Wiki: http://wiki.logos.com/Table_of_Contents__

Posts 28963
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 21 2009 4:25 PM

Yes, but I was really hoping the original poster would offer either an explanation or an apology. I really do want to know where such misinformation comes from ... and I certainly am not immune from being taken in by bad sources of information.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 569
J. Morris | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 21 2009 4:46 PM

With the release of L4, it seems there has been quite the influx of new forum posters (me included, logos user for over 10 years and my first forum post was day one of L4)

With that "influx" comes all kinds of people.  Some of which display their "colors" a bit too brightly (or darkly rather).  I believe the Lord Jesus' command to "Love God, Love Others" still stands... Indifferent  If He has decided to omit that (which fulfills the WHOLE law) then I missed the memo.

Posts 28963
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 21 2009 5:08 PM

Robert Pavich:
Roman Catholic

Robert, you may already know this but may I give a technical adjustment? Yes, I know this is 'off topic' but it's interesting trivia.

Roman Catholic is short-hand for Roman Rite Catholic. The Catholic Church includes:

  1. Roman liturgical tradition
    1. Latin (Roman) Rite
    2. Mozarabic Rite
    3. Anglican use (recently expanded)
    4. Ambrosian Rite
    5. Braga Rite
    6. Dominican Rite
    7. Carthusian Rite
    8. Carmelite Rite
  2. Alexandrian liturgical tradition
    1. Coptic Catholic Church
    2. Ethiopian Catholic Church
  3. Antiochian (Antiochene or West-Syrian) liturgical tradition
    1. Maronite Church
    2. Syriac Catholic Church[
    3. Syro-Malankara Catholic Church
  4. Armenian liturgical tradition:
    1. Armenian Catholic Church
  5. Chaldean or East Syrian liturgical tradition:
    1. Chaldean Catholic Church
    2. Syro-Malabar Church
  6. Byzantine (Constantinopolitan) liturgical tradition:
    1. Albanian Greek Catholic Church
    2. Belarusian Greek Catholic Church
    3. Bulgarian Greek Catholic Church[
    4. Byzantine Church of the Eparchy of Križevci
    5. Hungarian Greek Catholic Church
    6. Italo-Albanian Catholic Church
    7. Macedonian Greek Catholic Church
    8. Melkite Greek Catholic Church
    9. Romanian Church United with Rome, Greek-Catholic
    10. Russian Catholic Church
    11. Ruthenian Catholic Church
    12. Slovak Greek Catholic Church
    13. Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church
    And yes, there are a few others but I can't find their names at the moment.

So I guess there is 'catholic' (single, early church), Catholic (American default of Roman Catholic), CATHOLIC (all the rites that somehow ultimate are in communion with the Bishop of Rome a.k.a. the Pope) and CATHOLIC (add in schismatics but not heretics)

Now I promise to sit down and shut up.Zip it!

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 2212
Damian McGrath | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 21 2009 5:16 PM

MJ. Smith:
Roman Catholic is short-hand for Roman Rite Catholic.

No. "Roman Catholic" is a term coined by Anglicans in England to disparage papists. It is never the self-identifier of the Catholic Church in any document except ecumenical dialogues with the Anglican Communion (and the occasional legal document in English ex-colonies).

I am a Latin Rite Catholic who uses the Roman liturgical tradition.

Posts 28963
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 21 2009 5:36 PM

I believe you ... I didn't know.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 2212
Damian McGrath | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 21 2009 5:45 PM

Heading still miles off topic...

Martha, try the online Catholic Encyclopaedia or Wikipedia entries on "Roman Catholic" or visit the discussion page for any "Roman Catholic" entry on Wikipedia - the last is a barrel of laughs.

 

Wrt...

 

MJ. Smith:
Roman liturgical tradition

  1. Latin (Roman) Rite
  2. Mozarabic Rite
  3. Anglican use (recently expanded)
  4. Ambrosian Rite
  5. Braga Rite
  6. Dominican Rite
  7. Carthusian Rite
  8. Carmelite Rite

The Latin Rite, or Western Rite, or Latin Church, or Western Church has various liturgical traditions. The majority tradition is the Roman Rite, some of the traditions grew out of the Roman Rite, some did not. The Ambrosian RIte, for example, heavily influenced the Roman Rite and then, in turn was influenced by it... The Mozarbic and Gallican Rites can not in anyway be considered Roman. The ROman influence was very late and minimal.

 

Posts 3861
Forum MVP
Friedrich | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 21 2009 6:03 PM

MJ. Smith:
In the Middle Ages there were "Pauper's Bibles" - basically pictures to tell the story with enough words to keep the person able to read the words on track.

 

They had COMIC BOOKS back then?  Was it JC Comics, or Marvelous Comics?  Stick out tongue

I like Apples.  Especially Honeycrisp.

Page 1 of 3 (44 items) 1 2 3 Next > | RSS