Lexham Bible Guide vs. Exegetical Summaries

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Tom Reynolds | Forum Activity | Posted: Mon, Aug 27 2012 11:12 PM

Logos has just posted two volumes of a new series on prepub: Lexham Bible Guide. This sounds quite similar in purpose to the Exegetical Summaries series. Perhaps someone at Logos could compare and contrast their format and purpose. The preview shots seem to show a work that spends less time comparing exegesis and more time providing flashy graphics. Would it be fair to say that the Lexham Bible Guide is aiming at a broader audience?

This looks like an interesting project and if it's half as useful as the Exegetical Summaries it will be well received.

http://www.logos.com/product/4294/exegetical-summaries-series

http://www.logos.com/product/25325/lexham-bible-guide-ephesians

http://www.logos.com/product/25324/lexham-bible-guide-genesis-1-11

 

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Doug Mangum | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Aug 28 2012 11:07 AM

Tom, that's a great question.

The main difference is that Exegetical Summaries are designed by SIL for Bible translators and take a very zoomed-in look at the text, walking you through the passage phrase by phrase. Most of the Exegetical Summaries volumes are prepared by SIL linguists or translators.

The Lexham Bible Guides are designed for Bible interpreters (students, pastors, teachers, etc.) and prepared by researchers trained in biblical languages and exegesis.

The Lexham Bible Guides will provide a big picture overview of the passage and explain the exegetical and theological issues raised by the text or raised by other interpreters interacting with the text. The scope is meant to cover all important thematic issues more than detailed textual issues. 

One major added benefit to the Lexham Bible Guides is the integration with the Logos library through curated links helping users go deeper into a topic with resources they already own or discover new resources with the help of annotations explaining why the resource might be useful for them.

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Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Aug 28 2012 11:23 AM

"Curated links"

I wonder what that could be. Yesterday I quoted Bob on a 'curated library'. That one hopefully is a reality; not just publishers dumping volumes.

But 'curated links'? I assume conceptually the Logos user, absent curated links, might pop himself or herself into another resource that's, well ... pretty stupid. A curated link prevents this, saving considerable Bible study time.

Or maybe (more seriously) the curated link insures when the user goes to the link, the destination indeed discusses the subject in the correct way.

I admit it sounds curious.

(no offense Doug ... appreciate your work and the new resources DO look REALLY GOOD)


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Doug Mangum | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Aug 28 2012 11:39 AM

"Curated links" simply means you're not blindly searching your Logos library for a topic. The basic search results may very well include a lot of hits that include your search phrase but might not be relevant for your topic. I know I've spent what feels like hours and hours sifting through irrelevant search results just to find that one good discussion of a topic. Curating links saves time for other users involved in studying the same issues or texts.

A curated link also takes you exactly to the relevant part of a resource that we've found useful but might not be at the top of your search results or in the typical commentaries you use. There's no attempt to make sure a resource addresses a subject "in the correct way" if by that you mean a particular approved interpretation. The curated links will (as much as possible) represent a variety of sometimes conflicting views on debated issues. 

Thanks for the feedback!

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Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Aug 28 2012 11:59 AM

Well now, that's makes the resources sound even more useful! Thanks for the quick reply.


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Tom Reynolds | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Aug 29 2012 2:16 AM

Thanks for the detailed reply Doug. I trust you are enjoying working on this series. Should we expect more volumes in the near future? It looks like this will be a massive undertaking if it is to cover the entire Bible and longer books are broken up into multiple volumes.

It would be nice if the product page could give a page count for each volume so that we know how much information is included. I know the standard answer is that these are digital books so they don't have traditional pages but that's not very helpful when making a buying decision.

Do you have an ETA on when Galatians will be available and/or who the author(s) will be? I'm quite partial to that book so would like to know.

Thanks!

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Doug Mangum | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Aug 29 2012 8:01 AM

Tom, the full scope of the series has not been planned out yet, but our goal is to cover the entire Bible. The timetable for that and which books will be done when has not been set. We'll definitely factor in feedback like your interest in Galatians when we consider which of Paul's letters to do next.

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Aug 29 2012 6:27 PM

Doug Mangum:
but our goal is to cover the entire Bible

I need to add the obligatory "whose entire Bible?"

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Giovanni Baggio | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Aug 29 2012 8:27 PM

MJ. Smith:

Doug Mangum:
but our goal is to cover the entire Bible

I need to add the obligatory "whose entire Bible?"

Alright sweetie read the forum guidelines: No theological debates.  I know catholics think they gave us the Bible but the reality remains the same GOD through the Holy Spirit GAVE us the Bible 2 Timothy 3:16-17; 2 Peter 1:20-21.  Plus remember that all we have are translations and copies of copies which God through providence has preserved for us.

Thanks honey!

Giovanni

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Tom Reynolds | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Aug 29 2012 9:17 PM

MJ. Smith:

Doug Mangum:
but our goal is to cover the entire Bible

I need to add the obligatory "whose entire Bible?"

That will probably depend on how well they sell :) If they don't sell, the entire bible will probably comprise Ephesians and Genesis 1-11! However, I suspect Logos will keep pushing on this and go as far as sales will allow.

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Jerry M | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Aug 29 2012 9:30 PM

The sales for books making up the larger canon may not be as large, but it would probably go a long way in keeping some of their customers happy! 

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Aug 29 2012 11:04 PM

Giovanni Baggio:
No theological debates.

Given that the issue applies to Anglicans, Lutherans, Catholics, Greek Orthodox, Slavonic Orthodox, Beta Israel, Assyrian Church, Coptic Church, Ethiopian Churches, Eritrean Church, Georgian and Armenian churches (the list of canon variants I can come up with off the top of my head and omitting some real oddities), I don't see this as a sectarian issue in the sense you seem to. My personal opinion is that Logos should support the canon as in the more recent National Council of the Churches of Christ in the U.S.A. translations including the Apocrypha which is broader than the Catholic canon. I have this silly idea that it is easier to ignore what one does not consider canonical than to read what is not present. Now if I were asking for the Oskan Armenian Orthodox Bible of 1666, that might be sectarian/theological.

 

 

Nota bene: the Oskan Armenian Orthodox Bible of 1666 is the only Bible I know of that included the Testaments of the 12 Patriarchs Smile

 

 

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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fgh | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Aug 30 2012 6:37 AM

Giovanni Baggio:
read the forum guidelines: No theological debates

She was asking for information about a Logos product. That's definitely not a "theological debate". Your post, on the other hand, clearly is (besides being condescending, accusatory and based on lies).

For the record: Catholics don't believe "they gave us the Bible". They believe that "all Scripture is breathed out by God". That's precisely why they're so eager to have all Scripture in their Bibles. If you'd bought some of the official Catholic documents in Logos and done a search you would have known that.

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NB.Mick | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Aug 30 2012 6:48 AM

fgh:

Giovanni Baggio:
read the forum guidelines: No theological debates

She was asking for information about a Logos product. That's definitely not a "theological debate". Your post, on the other hand, clearly is (besides being condescending, accusatory and based on lies).

For the record: Catholics don't believe "they gave us the Bible". They believe that "all Scripture is breathed out by God". That's precisely why they're so eager to have all Scripture in their Bibles. If you'd bought some of the official Catholic documents in Logos and done a search you would have known that.

Yes

by the way, I think that - should this new series sell and they have the resources to produce it (here: scholars to write it) - I'd expect Logos to do Bible Guides on the Apocrypha, just as they did produce/are producing a Classic Commentaries and Studies collection. The two books now clearly are a test to gauge interest. However, I don't think we will see two or more every month from now on.

If I should post wishes for the nearer future: Romans and Gospel of John.

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Lynden Williams | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Aug 30 2012 6:51 AM

MJ. Smith:
he Oskan Armenian Orthodox Bible of 1666 is the only Bible I know of that included the Testaments of the 12 Patriarchs

I am interested in works of the apocrypha. Sectarian or not, I say to Logos go for it. Testament of the 12 Patriarchs sounds good. Ignore Giovanni. 

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Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Aug 30 2012 7:04 AM

They'll probably be struggling just to do the 66 book group. What a challenge.

Adding the apocrypha, I think, would actually be more valuable than some of the OT books. No offense to some of the OT books ... Eccl, SOS, even Proverbs ..but these type you usually study from front to back).

But it's tough finding good discussion on the apocrypha, even though it seems to have gotten greater use by the apostolic fathers even than what we call the NT. Just last night I was digging through Tobit due to Clement.

But the whole thing is going to be a 'honey' of a deal.  Giovanni loves honey!


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Doug Mangum | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Aug 30 2012 9:25 AM

Well, let's start with the 66 book Protestant canon. Those should keep us busy for a while. I can't even promise we'll get through all of those. I mean, I only have some 30-35 years left before retirement. Smile

Also, these first two on pre-pub are designed to gauge interest in the idea. Guides on the 66 books in almost every Christian canon have a better chance of selling to a broader audience. Tom is right. How much we do depends on how well they sell.

Thanks, MJ, for reminding me that I need to be more specific and avoid vague terms like "entire Bible." 

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Armin | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Sep 2 2012 1:09 PM

Will there be a discounted collection at some point or do I need to buy each book individually? That would turn out pretty expensive. 

Armin

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Alain Maashe | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Sep 28 2012 12:18 PM

I like the idea behind the Lexham Bible guides especially with a focus on interpretive and background issues.

However two issues are preventing me from embracing the series:

Price: The technical nature of the resources used by both the Lexham Bible guides and the Exegetical Summaries suggests that they are targeted towards bible school/ seminary educated or biblically knowledgeable self-taught individuals. These two series are doing things that you can do yourself if you own the resources they interact with but their advantage is that they simplify what is time consuming work.

However, I got the   Exegetical Summaries on prepub for less than $9 a volume. The Lexham guides on prepub are as high as $95 (Gen 12-50) and $75( Luke), multiply that by the whole bible and you might have to skip a few mortgage payments even if we take into account lower priced volumes. While I was glad to see someone else do the work for me for $9 a volume, I can do the job myself for ten times that.

 

Scope: the Exegetical Summaries include all the major commentaries and lexicons (up to the time of publication) and classify them under the major views. It is the comprehensive nature of the Exegetical Summaries that I find the most attractive. It saves me time by not requiring me to consult all my commentaries to know where they stand on a given exegetical or grammatical issue.

The Lexham Bible guides do not have the same comprehensiveness. While it is not necessary to list all the dictionaries that have en entry of Cain or Abel, it is a good idea to give a big picture of the landscape when it comes to interpretive issues like the meaning of the offerings of Cain and Abel. Only Brueggemann, Matthews Skinner, and Waltke are listed, they could represent available options but one cannot be sure until you check for yourself, it would be nice to know where the other major commentaries and interpreters fall on this issue. Without a sense of comprehensiveness, the usefulness of the tool is greatly diminished for the intended audience because those who have the technical works listed (DOTP, NIDOTTE, COS, Continental,WBC, NIVOT, ICC)  already know where to go to find a dictionary entry on Cain or Abel, and do keyword or etymological  studies using the tools included in Logos (I would actually prefer a more streamline exegetical guide/ power lookup with these basic features built in).

What is more useful is a resource that follows the Exegetical Summaries in giving an overview of the scholarly landscape by classifying the various views.

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Armin | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Sep 29 2012 1:04 AM

Hi Alain,

I have to agree with you. At the moment, I have signed up for the prepubs but I am considering dropping them as these resources are just too expensive. By the time, all books of the Bible are covered, this will likely be the most expensive resource set. Is this really worth it? I increasingly doubt it.

Armin

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