Lutheran wishlist/bundle ideas...

Page 1 of 1 (9 items)
This post has 8 Replies | 0 Followers

Posts 1779
Ken McGuire | Forum Activity | Posted: Sun, Apr 28 2013 2:44 PM

First of all, I hesitate to state this here, but the current Logos incarnation of the Kolb/Wengert edition of the Book of Concord is an embarrassment.  The tagging seems inconsistent and in addition the references under the article level are not even displayed.  This combination makes it quite difficult to use.

It would be great to add the Sources and Contexts book edited by Kolb and Nestingen, as well as the new History and Theology of the Book of Concord by Kolb, Arand, and Nestingen.

While many classic works from the 16th century are available, it would be nice to add a more complete collection of Sermons of Martin Luther, as well as his Letters of Spiritual Counsel.  In addition the 1521 Loci of Melanchthon would be nice, even if a later edition is available.

For Luther's biography, the 3 volumes of Brecht would be good.

My body, the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod, has offered decent collections about Lutheran Orthodoxy.  But there are few resources for Lutheran Pietism, in its various forms - in spite of its continuing influence.  Ardnt's True Christianity and Spener's Pia Desideria leap to my mind.  But much of the continuing influence of Pietism is in hymns...  At the very least, there should be a collection of Paul Gerhard.  Maybe the Lyra Germanica of Winkworth.

Speaking of Hymns, a collection of Grundtvig would be good.

Missouri has been pretty good at releasing the most important 19th century works form her history. In addition, many biblical works have been added because of general interest (eg. Hengstenberg, K&D) But some important books like von Harless's Christian Ethics and Loehe's Three Books about the Church are missing.

From the German Church Struggle, you now have Bonhoeffer (yippee!!) but I wish Schlink's Theology of the Lutheran Confessions was available, as well as von Rad's commentaries on Genesis and Deuteronomy.

Some 20th century introductions include Hermann Sasse's Here We Stand, Gerhard Forde's Where God Meets Man, Gritsch and Jensen's Lutheranism, Braaten's Principles of Lutheran Theology,

The American Lutheran/Roman Catholic dialogue reports and ESPECIALLY the study documents are wonderful and would be welcome in Logos.

The Gospel is not ... a "new law," on the contrary, ... a "new life." - William Julius Mann

L8 Anglican, Lutheran and Orthodox Silver, Reformed Starter, Academic Essentials

L7 Lutheran Gold, Anglican Bronze

Posts 796
LogosEmployee
Gabe Martini (Faithlife) | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 28 2013 3:00 PM

Ken,

These are great suggestions, I will look into all of these.

BTW, some of the works you mentioned are included in this set: http://www.logos.com/product/26890/augsburg-fortress-lutheran-studies-collection

Gabe

Product Department Manager
Faithlife

Posts 4625
RIP
Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 28 2013 5:10 PM

Peace, Gabe!                       Thanks very much for listening!                  May God give you Wisdom and Strength for the many endeavours you have ahead of you!               *smile*

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

Posts 8899
fgh | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 29 2013 4:09 AM

Ken McGuire:
there are few resources for Lutheran Pietism, in its various forms - in spite of its continuing influence.  Ardnt's True Christianity and Spener's Pia Desideria leap to my mind.

  • Christian Scriver's The Soul's Treasure
  • Jakob Böhme
  • Carl Olof Rosenius

And perhaps some more Bo Giertz? Henrik Schartau hasn't been translated (apart from the quotes in Hammer of God), has he? Or Gunnar Rosendal? (Not that either of these are strictly Pietist. In fact, Gunnar Rosendal was pretty much the founder of Swedish High Church Lutheranism.)

Reformed, but much read among Lutheran pietists: Gerhard Tersteegen.

(Arndt can be found in the Files forum, but I agree it's a bit embarrassing that Logos is still missing him. Would probably be better to wait/hope for the Classics of Western Spirituality (series), though, rather than putting some old outdated translation on CP.)

Ken McGuire:
Speaking of Hymns, a collection of Grundtvig would be good.

Speaking of Danes, Logos is also still missing Kierkegaard (although he too is in the Files forum). Those who just preordered Peter Vardy's book on him would probably appreciate some working links... But perhaps he will turn up among the Loeb CP's?

Ken McGuire:
von Rad's commentaries on Genesis and Deuteronomy

Asked for numerous times, e g at Old Testament Library.

More conspicuously missing classics:

  • Joachim Jeremias: The Eucharistic Words of Jesus
  • Anders Nygren: Agape and Eros. (The translator must have read from right to left: it should be Eros and Agape!)
  • Gustaf Aulén: Christus Victor. And perhaps some others.
  • Oscar Cullmann
  • Rudolf Bultmann
  • Paul Tillich
  • Martin Niemöller
  • Not sure if Reinhold Niebuhr qualifies as  Lutheran or Reformed?

And of course Jaroslav Pelikan started out as Lutheran -- giving Gabe two for the price of one.Stick out tongue

Three Nobel Laureates for Vyrso:

  • Dag Hammarskjöld: Markings
  • Selma Lagerlöf: Jerusalem
  • Pär Lagerkvist: Barabbas

Ken McGuire:
The American Lutheran/Roman Catholic dialogue reports and ESPECIALLY the study documents are wonderful and would be welcome in Logos.

Gabe, given how many churches you're handling, I hereby dub you to also be Logos' Ecumenical Product Manager.Big Smile

As such, you are now responsible for adding the WCC to Logos' list of publishers, see Some ecumenical books (includes a couple of Augsburg books as well). I really want the Growth in Agreement volume[s ].

(Btw, lots of Christians work at the WCC for a couple of years and then go back home. Sounds like a good marketing opportunity to me... And the LWF also has offices in Geneva, as has others.)

Also the Ecumenical Communauté de Taizé. I believe Br Roger's books have been asked for (Vyrso?), but what I, personally, really really want is Br Max Thurian's The Eucharistic Memorial. Part I-II, which is a very good study on the idea of sacrifice and memorial in the Old and New Testaments, but unfortunately long out of print. It deserves to be read much more widely, as it has some potential to untie some ecumenical knots in regard to the Eucharist. I've been happy to see, however, that it seems to have received a renewed interest lately, from different sides of the theological spectrum. I've heard/read Scott Hahn and Karlo Broussard refer to it, and Eugene Peterson's Take and Read: Spiritual Reading: An Annotated List* recommends it as the 10th best book on Worship/Liturgy. Now, if only it was available... As for the author, he died a Catholic, but was still Reformed when he wrote this. I believe he was generally considered to be Taizé's theologian, and he was also an observer during Vatican II.

And if we're talking Ecumenism, I guess there's one more Swede I shouldn't forget: Nathan Söderblom (yet another Nobel Laureate). 

(Yes, I am Swedish... -- but the Church of Sweden also happens to be the largest Lutheran church in the world.Big Smile)

(Now, look how many Lutherans I could come up with when I really tried. And I who thought I only wanted Catholics and Orthodox and Jews.Big Smile)

* which, btw, you should put on your Reformed list. A book that makes people want to buy other books: can it be better from Logos' perspective?Stick out tongue You could give it away for free, and you'd still earn money on it!Wink -- Provided, of course, you also make sure you sell the books he's recommending.

"The Christian way of life isn't so much an assignment to be performed, as a gift to be received."  Wilfrid Stinissen

Mac Pro OS 10.9.

Posts 1779
Ken McGuire | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 29 2013 5:54 AM

First of all, a big Thank You to Gabe for responding SO FAST, and also to fgh for tagging on.

fgh:
And perhaps some more Bo Giertz? Henrik Schartau hasn't been translated (apart from the quotes in Hammer of God), has he? Or Gunnar Rosendal? (Not that either of these are strictly Pietist. In fact, Gunnar Rosendal was pretty much the founder of Swedish High Church Lutheranism.)

I would LOVE more Bo Giertz.  Hammer of God should be prominently featured somehow instead of being buried in the Vyrso Products page.  Unfortunately little Giertz has been translated into English.  I have To Live with Christ within arms reach now (the 2 Swedish volumes are combined in the English).  I guess there is a translation of Liturgy and Spiritual Awakening floating around.  And after hearing the wonderful Schartau in Hammer of God, I looked for his works and found nothing in English.

I suppose there should be some Hauge too, but even if my Lutheran family background goes back to Norway, he isn't that attractive to me or my interests.

fgh:

More conspicuously missing classics:

  • Joachim Jeremias: The Eucharistic Words of Jesus
  • Anders Nygren: Agape and Eros. (The translator must have read from right to left: it should be Eros and Agape!)
  • Gustaf Aulén: Christus Victor. And perhaps some others.
  • Oscar Cullmann
  • Rudolf Bultmann
  • Paul Tillich
  • Martin Niemöller
  • Not sure if Reinhold Niebuhr qualifies as  Lutheran or Reformed?

Agreed.  All these would be interesting and useful.  I would be interested in multiple works by the Niebuhr brothers, even if they were strictly speaking Evangelical Reformed (merged German Union and German Reformed).  Heck, Tillich was Prussian Union and then Evangelical Reformed.  That doesn't mean I can't learn from them.

Also add Peter Brunner - Worship in the name of Jesus

Gustaf Wingren had many good books as well.  Luther on Vocation is a classic, but I actually like Man and the Incarnation more.

More than a part of me wants more Werner Elert and Hermann Sasse, but that might have only limited appeal (as in to a specific flavor of Lutherans)

After years of seeing Hans Iwand in footnotes for Forde and Moltmann, a work of his is in English.  I would think his Righteousness of Faith according to Luther would be of interest to many - especially since Justification has become a topic of discussion after the New Perspective of Paul.

I have read of Karl Holl's works many times, but never read anything by him...

Pelikan goes without saying.  Anyone who knows anything about Church History recognizes the value of his work, even if they disagree with him (and I think he is largely on the right track)  I left him off my list because I assumed that since it has been requested so much I didn't need to. 

Hmm - I wonder if there could be a "Lutherans on Romans" bundle...  Nygren, Kasemann, Melanchthon, I suppose you could include Luther too (The Luther is a quite early work and later on Melanchthon was the Romans expert at Wittenberg)

The Gospel is not ... a "new law," on the contrary, ... a "new life." - William Julius Mann

L8 Anglican, Lutheran and Orthodox Silver, Reformed Starter, Academic Essentials

L7 Lutheran Gold, Anglican Bronze

Posts 2964
tom | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 29 2013 7:25 AM

While outside the scope of the Ken's original post

fgh:
Also the Ecumenical Communauté de Taizé. I believe Br Roger's

YesYesYesYes

Posts 8899
fgh | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 29 2013 7:51 AM

Ken McGuire:
I would LOVE more Bo Giertz.  Hammer of God should be prominently featured somehow instead of being buried in the Vyrso Products page.  Unfortunately little Giertz has been translated into English.  I have To Live with Christ within arms reach now (the 2 Swedish volumes are combined in the English).  I guess there is a translation of Liturgy and Spiritual Awakening floating around.

Did I just cost you a lot of money?Big Smile

Ken McGuire:
after hearing the wonderful Schartau in Hammer of God, I looked for his works and found nothing in English.

The full sermon quoted in the the Hammer can be found at http://thefirstpremise.blogspot.se/2009/08/henric-schartau-jesus-only.html, and it's possible there are other texts in Henric Schartau and the Order of Grace, but that seems to be about all.

Ken McGuire:
Gustaf Wingren had many good books as well.

How could I possibly forget Wingren?! Embarrassed

Ken McGuire:
I actually like Man and the Incarnation more

Is that the one on Irenaeus, which is called something like 'Human and Christian' in Swedish?

Which reminds me about Lars Thunberg on St Maximus the Confessor: a dissertation called Microcosm and Mediator, or the shorter updated and popularized version called Man and the Cosmos, published by St Vladimir's. Not bad for a Lutheran to be approved by St Vladimir's on a Patristic subject.Stick out tongue  (Note to Gabe: Swedish dissertations tend to be cheap, if published through the University, not at all like American ones. Though it looks like someone's already grabbed the international rights for this one -- but perhaps not the electronic ones.)

"The Christian way of life isn't so much an assignment to be performed, as a gift to be received."  Wilfrid Stinissen

Mac Pro OS 10.9.

Posts 4625
RIP
Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 29 2013 8:06 AM

What a wonderful thread!                 Thank you all!      fgh, your post was truly excellent!    *smile*

                                                                      Peace!

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

Posts 796
LogosEmployee
Gabe Martini (Faithlife) | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 29 2013 9:49 AM

Thank you for the suggestions, everyone.

Don't worry, Pelikan is definitely on my wish list. And yes, he kills two proverbial birds with one stone. Wink

For my sake, please email me organized lists (Title/Author/Publisher) for anything that you are particularly passionate about, and I'll get right on it as best I can. gabe.martini@logos.com

A blessed Holy Week to any Orthodox friends out there!

Gabe

Product Department Manager
Faithlife

Page 1 of 1 (9 items) | RSS