Build it yourself PC

Page 1 of 2 (39 items) 1 2 Next >
This post has 38 Replies | 4 Followers

Posts 2249
mab | Forum Activity | Posted: Wed, Jun 12 2013 11:35 AM

I was wondering if anyone finds it worthwhile to build their own computer. Not necessarily to save big money, but more to create a more serviceable and upgradeable machine. At least from what I've been reading, it's not very complex as long as you carefully pick compatible components and assemble it with equal diligence. 

The mind of man is the mill of God, not to grind chaff, but wheat. Thomas Manton | Study hard, for the well is deep, and our brains are shallow. Richard Baxter

Posts 3938
abondservant | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 12 2013 11:46 AM

I always build my own.

The most expensive part is not always the best quality, but the least expensive part is almost never the best quality.

For hardware reviews by the pro's check out tomshardwarepage and I find the reviews on newegg to be helpful as well.

Consider putting your logos installation on a solid state disk, it makes installation and indexing a breeze.

L2 lvl4, L3 Scholars, L4 Scholars, L5 Platinum,  L6 Collectors. L7 Baptist Portfolio. L8 Baptist Platinum.

Posts 670
Sleiman | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 12 2013 11:53 AM

mab:
to create a more serviceable and upgradeable machine.
Yup, the most serviceable upgradeable machine is one you build yourself. I built my first custom PC a year ago; and no regrets whatsoever. It's fun too. I also echo abondservant's observations.

Posts 3661
BillS | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 12 2013 12:51 PM

mab:

I was wondering if anyone finds it worthwhile to build their own computer. Not necessarily to save big money, but more to create a more serviceable and upgradeable machine. At least from what I've been reading, it's not very complex as long as you carefully pick compatible components and assemble it with equal diligence. 

I did that for awhile---until I got tired of being my own (& my wife's) tech support on OEM Microsoft products, especially the operating system. When the inevitable problems come, they don't like supporting an OEM o/s.

From a h/w standpoint, it's pretty easy to build (if components are compatible; not all seem to be). And the ones I built lasted longer & were faster than any others I've ever owned.

At this point, I custom order & find it's less expensive than building plus the support is a whole lot easier. And now being in the PASTOR business rather than the TECH business (as for 25 years while I was building), given that $ & time are both weighted in favor of BUY vs. build, I buy...

Grace & Peace,
Bill


Asus GF63 8RD, I-7 8850H, 32GB RAM, 1TB SSD, 2TB HDD, NVIDIA GTX 1050Max
Samsung S9+, 64GB
Fire 10HD 64GB 7th Gen

Posts 2038
Unix | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 12 2013 1:15 PM

I just add RAM, and external keyboard to my newer laptop. Perhaps also SSD and software upgrade (from W7 64-bit and Office 2010 Starter to W8 and Word 2013 and the equivalent to Excel in LibreOffice). Keyboard: www.trulyergonomic.com
To the older laptop I only add an external monitor and use the same trulyergonomic keyboard for it too, it already had maximal RAM, an external HDD and an internal SSD when I bought (asked seller to exchange those parts with each other and he did it at no extra cost, he's a pro having worked with computers since age 14 and now working with surveillance cam computers).

If You look at my recent posts You can see that I've been asking software upgrade questions related to upgrading from W7 to W8 and Word 2010 Starter to Word 2013. Also at: leaving web pages open. IE10. W8 vs W7?

Samsung laptops hold the benefit of that You can set the battery to be charge to only 80% of its capacity, that gives an extra year or perhaps two.

I will not be buying more/replacing computers for the next 2-3 years or more.

Aply!
trulyergonomic.com 5,850own
12G A9-9420 V8.3 Acc 11
d:'13Q3 12G

Posts 2762
Erwin Stull, Sr. | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 12 2013 2:15 PM

I would find it beneficial, but only for a techie (in terms of financial and support). Some years ago, I used to build and sell custom PCs, however, when the market changed, and it became more economical to buy from a big name manufacturer, I got out of that business because it would cost more for me to build the machines for a company than to write the specs and recommend a few manufacturers. I would build a machine today (for myself) for the pleasure of doing so, as it will most likely cost more (and sometime much more) than a comparable system from a manufacturer.

As far as tech support and warranty goes; if you are not a techie, it is definitely more cost effective to buy a machine from a manufacturer. Most will give you that 3-5 year protection, whereas if you build your own, it is your responsibility to troubleshoot and determine what failed and if that particular part is under warranty. For software and operating support, people rarely call MS, Adobe, etc. In my entire career life as a professional and an end user, I can only remember calling MS 2 times, and that was for a major network issue in which I had ran out of option and corrective measures. Time and money were factors in this.

I pray this gives you some insight. Smile

Posts 201
Garrett Ho | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 12 2013 2:29 PM

If you can build it without hassles, do it. Otherwise, wait for a good PC deal and use that as a starting point.

Two days ago, HP had a deal on an i7 3770 with 10gb of ram for $550, as a reference point. If you were to add an SSD you'd have a great computer for Logos. Now that Intel released their updated processors, I'm sure there will be more deals.

Posts 476
Travis Walter | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 12 2013 3:14 PM

As the price of the PC increases, the ability to save increases also.  You will really start to see savings when you start to cross the $2K barrier or more.

Posts 3938
abondservant | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 12 2013 3:17 PM

Travis Walter:

As the price of the PC increases, the ability to save increases also.  You will really start to see savings when you start to cross the $2K barrier or more.



Agreed...

My pc would cost thousands if you were to buy it somewhere... I've spent "merely" hundreds...

If you can support it your self, its worth it in my book. If not, get a Dell lol.

L2 lvl4, L3 Scholars, L4 Scholars, L5 Platinum,  L6 Collectors. L7 Baptist Portfolio. L8 Baptist Platinum.

Posts 2249
mab | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 12 2013 3:48 PM

What I was thinking of doing was taking a suggested build and using that as my starting point. Not sure how much it would actually wind up costing, but this way I would eliminate the compromises that a typical machine has and it would be absolutely free of the software that the manufacturers seem to load onto a machine whether you want them or not. 

The other thinking from my perspective is that I can justify a DIY because I am a geek. Geeked Just buying a high end machine would likely end up with my being considered a wastrel.

The mind of man is the mill of God, not to grind chaff, but wheat. Thomas Manton | Study hard, for the well is deep, and our brains are shallow. Richard Baxter

Posts 476
Travis Walter | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 12 2013 3:53 PM

Well when ever you start a custom PC you need to have a price point.

Also I'm not sure what you consider high end?  Just as a reference my computer prob cost over $5K to build.  Not bragging, its actually 3 years old now, just giving a reference.  There is always someone with a bigger, better and prettier machine..

Posts 3938
abondservant | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 12 2013 3:58 PM

Well if I can make a couple suggestions: Asus or Gigabyte motherboards (even so check out the model you use before you buy!). I have the asus sabertooth 990x v2 in my desktop.

Secondly, AMD processors are SLIGHTLY slower - but in practice fast enough, and equally stable. Though they do tend to draw more current than Intel chips which are usually three or more times more expensive.

Thirdly if you go AMD go with a Radeon Graphics card, if you go Intel go with an Nvidia graphics card. They can be mixed and matched... But generally speaking you are better off that way. Radeon is a subsidiary of AMD now.

Fourth, a family friend who works at MS in Clearwater once told me that display real-estate and productivity go up together. I personally use three displays (mixed and matched). Its great to have your sermon in the middle, full screen, and resources open to the left and right on other displays. 

I had a display go bad recently, and a friend of mine offered me two 24" displays for 75$... Needless to say I'm jumping on it.

Finally if you like I can send you the specs and model numbers that I used for my build. You can find me on facebook @ jcr.chilis at gmail (.) com. Just send me a message letting me know you are from the Logos forums and I'll accept the request (that goes for all of you, not just OP).

Geek by day, Pastor by night. lol

L2 lvl4, L3 Scholars, L4 Scholars, L5 Platinum,  L6 Collectors. L7 Baptist Portfolio. L8 Baptist Platinum.

Posts 2249
mab | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 12 2013 4:33 PM

I was definitely thinking multiple monitors and an SSD. Probably nothing so high end as what some gamer or guy processing special effects video might want. Pretty sure that this would probably be near $2K if I bought it built.  

The other thing is that this isn't a rush deal. It's something I've always wanted to do, but never could carve out either the means or time to do it. Now at least I know what it's being used for and I can build it with those goals in mind.  

The mind of man is the mill of God, not to grind chaff, but wheat. Thomas Manton | Study hard, for the well is deep, and our brains are shallow. Richard Baxter

Posts 13358
Forum MVP
Mark Barnes | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 12 2013 4:39 PM

mab:

I was wondering if anyone finds it worthwhile to build their own computer. Not necessarily to save big money, but more to create a more serviceable and upgradeable machine. At least from what I've been reading, it's not very complex as long as you carefully pick compatible components and assemble it with equal diligence. 

I built one a few months ago for myself. It allowed me to get exactly the spec I wanted, and saved me about $100.

http://uk.pcpartpicker.com/user/mark8barnes/saved/18jD - that's an excellent site for planning your build.

Posts 3938
abondservant | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 12 2013 4:57 PM

http://uk.pcpartpicker.com/p/15MDE

This is more or less my PC, except prices in USD were way cheaper. I paid 89.99 for the cpu on sale, and 175$ for the motherboard, 40$ a stick for memory, and 100$ for the ssd on sale. I have more storage than I listed on the build and I paid more for those as well (100$ usd each). My seagates have seen about 30,000 hours of use in the past three years.

Any way... I have about 600$ into my whole setup including the windows 8 license.

L2 lvl4, L3 Scholars, L4 Scholars, L5 Platinum,  L6 Collectors. L7 Baptist Portfolio. L8 Baptist Platinum.

Posts 2249
mab | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 12 2013 5:28 PM

Nice builds. I think I'll spec what I envision and then see what components will work together for that. I'll probably look first at the video cards since I'm planning on multiple monitors. I also will likely have to rearrange my desk to do that. That could be the hardest thing of all!Hmm

The mind of man is the mill of God, not to grind chaff, but wheat. Thomas Manton | Study hard, for the well is deep, and our brains are shallow. Richard Baxter

Posts 8967
RIP
Matthew C Jones | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 12 2013 7:13 PM

mab:
I'll probably look first at the video cards since I'm planning on multiple monitors. I also will likely have to rearrange my desk to do that. That could be the hardest thing of all!Hmm

Just move the office to the living room, get three 73" flat screens, and a good swivel chair. Stick out tongue

Logos 7 Collectors Edition

Posts 3938
abondservant | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 12 2013 7:31 PM

Got this link in my email earlier... ~350$ for a relatively decent kit... just need to add an operating system and optical drives if needed. Just note that there is a rebate involved.

L2 lvl4, L3 Scholars, L4 Scholars, L5 Platinum,  L6 Collectors. L7 Baptist Portfolio. L8 Baptist Platinum.

Posts 2249
mab | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 12 2013 8:50 PM

Super Tramp:
Just move the office to the living room, get three 73" flat screens, and a good swivel chair. Stick out tongue

I'm in the living room with swivel chair already, but I don't think the landlord wants me to knock down a wall for three 73 inch screens.  Maybe three 27 inch ones. Unless you all think I'd be slumming...Wink 

The mind of man is the mill of God, not to grind chaff, but wheat. Thomas Manton | Study hard, for the well is deep, and our brains are shallow. Richard Baxter

Posts 3938
abondservant | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 12 2013 9:59 PM

I had 2 22's and a 30. Now I have a 22 and a 30... But will soon have 2 24's a 22 and a 30.

3 27's would be nice. Especially if they are all the same make and model. Mine are mostly acquired slowly and over time as people want to upgrade and give me their old stuff... The 30 is a LCD TV that was bequeathed to me.

L2 lvl4, L3 Scholars, L4 Scholars, L5 Platinum,  L6 Collectors. L7 Baptist Portfolio. L8 Baptist Platinum.

Page 1 of 2 (39 items) 1 2 Next > | RSS