Stuck on Pre-Pub

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Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 26 2014 7:31 AM

abondservant ... Spicq was probably most similar to Harvey Skelt and maybe William Almal. Probably Charles Lander, though his englishness would never have matched Ceslas' french perspective.  In the end, it was Drew L'mocl that truly understood Spicq.

I made that whole thing up.  The reason is that if you read about Spicq, you don't get very far.  The blog article is a good example.  Instead, you have to read Spicq (or take someone else's word for it, as many do).  Below I copied from Spicq's lexicon to illustrate his approach.  Notice how he throws out quite a bit of perspectives, some hints of what he thinks, but leaves the reader with a bit of angst.  Western writers (and readers) tend to want a yes/no, up/down, left/right ... make up your mind type of approach.  Spicq delivers the nuance.

And in Hebrews, the nuance is the criticality.  Absent a background in 2nd Temple and even Apostolic Fathers, Hebrews provides good quotes.  But the nuance in Hebrews is so much more interesting.

καταναρκάω
katanarkaō, to burden, to benumb
katanarkaō, S 2655; EDNT 2.265; MM 330; L&N 57.224; BDF §181; BAGD 414–415

The simple verb narkaō, “become numb, paralyzed,” is used of sinews (Gen 32:26, 33), arms (Dan 11:6), the mass of “crippled” bone (Job 33:19, Theodotion) that precludes movement and confines to bed. Hippocrates observes that the patient is susceptible to paralysis and coma, together with a lack of feeling (Hippocrates, Liqu. 1.3), and that “a large quantity of cold water dulls the pain” (6.2–3).

The compound katanarkaō also belongs to the medical vocabulary, but St. Paul, in three occurrences of the word, gives it an active sense, unusual in Greek literature—and also figurative: ou katenarkēsa outhenos (2 Cor 11:9), ou katenarkēsa hymōn (12:13), ou katanarkēsō (12:14). Most modern versions translate: “I avoided being a burden to you … I was not a burden to you … I will not burden you.” They are following the Vulgate (nullus onerosus fui) and the Peshitta, Chrysostom, and Theodoret, who see the word as a synonym of barynō. This is also in line with St. Jerome’s identification of the usage as a Cilicism. It is indeed possible that from the meaning “be numb and dull” there was a transition to “be inactive, burdensome.” The apostle would mean that his presence at Corinth was not taxing for the community.

But LSJ tranlates “to be slothful” (cf. Hesychius, narkē-oknēria). E. B. Allo better follows the medical meaning “anaesthetize,” proposing, for lack of a better translation, enjôler. The verb is unknown in the papyri.

"I didn't know God made honky tonk angels."

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 26 2014 2:59 PM

Denise:
Western writers (and readers) tend to want a yes/no, up/down, left/right ... make up your mind type of approach.  Spicq delivers the nuance.

Another perspective http://catholic-resources.org/Both-And.htm

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 76
Ryan Burns | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Aug 30 2014 10:08 AM

For what it is worth, I haven't check in on the collection in several months. Just looked now and it is crazy close.

I'm mostly just commenting for 2 reasons. 

1. Bumps the post back up in the recent posts and gets people to see it again and hopefully jump in.

2. I really want Spicq to go to production.

Helping people find seminary scholarships and church jobs.

Posts 3942
abondservant | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Aug 30 2014 10:23 AM

Thank you!

I am in.

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Posts 2377
Beloved | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Aug 30 2014 2:10 PM

For all you lovers of NICNT it should be noted that Spicq is cited some 57 times in Cockerill's volume on Hebrews. Luke T. Johnson in his commentary that is currently under development in Logos the New Testament Library Series cites Spicq 8 times and I provide a link to a statement he makes on page ix.

One of Spicq's most cited novel observations is his view that the writer of Hebrews shares a worldview with Philo. I urge you who are on the fence regarding this extraordinary work of scholarship which is value priced on pre-pub to place your order and move this work into production. We who have been waiting patiently will appreciate it.

Edit: I'd also like to add that my library returns some 1,111 hits for L'Epitre aux Hebreux.

Meanwhile, Jesus kept on growing wiser and more mature, and in favor with God and his fellow man.

International Standard Version. (2011). (Lk 2:52). Yorba Linda, CA: ISV Foundation.

Posts 2377
Beloved | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Aug 30 2014 3:05 PM

bump my edit Smile

Meanwhile, Jesus kept on growing wiser and more mature, and in favor with God and his fellow man.

International Standard Version. (2011). (Lk 2:52). Yorba Linda, CA: ISV Foundation.

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