Which of these Two Commentaries Will Fit Me best?

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Posts 1647
Rick | Forum Activity | Posted: Sun, Dec 8 2013 12:05 PM

I have decided to start building Logos credit in order to be able to purchase one of these two, apparently well liked commentary sets.

They are Word Biblical and New International Commentary.

Which do you think that, based on the information that I supply, would best suit me? I know that it is difficult to really do what I have asked but will appreciate any recommendations that are given.

  • Affiliation: Conservative Anabaptist
  • Formal training in religion or languages: None
  • Education: High School
  • Interests: In depth New Testament studies with general Old Testament studies. All studies are personal or small group.
  • Minister: No, simple layperson
  • Even though I do not know the original languages, I do enjoy reading about decisions that the translators had to make and why they made them.
  • When scripture is practiced and applied in more than one way, I would like a commentary that covers as many of them as possible.

Peace  Smile

Romans 14:19 (NRSV)
19 Let us then pursue what makes for peace and for mutual upbuilding.

Posts 1599
Ken McGuire | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Dec 8 2013 12:33 PM

Word is one of the best values for commentary set in Logos.  But it quotes the original languages in the original language and alphabet.  If you know them, this is better, but for you it might be.  Also the format takes a bit to get used to.

NICNT is highly recommended here, with many good reasons.  But it is more expensive and only covers the NT.  Personally I have WBC in Logos and a few volumes of NICNT in print.

SDG

Ken McGuire

The Gospel is not ... a "new law," on the contrary, ... a "new life." - William Julius Mann

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Jack Caviness | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Dec 8 2013 12:33 PM

Rick:
Affiliation: Conservative Anabaptist

Not sure about Anabaptist content, but NIC is more conservative than Word, but like any multi-volume set, quality varies in both.

Ken McGuire:
But it is more expensive and only covers the NT.

NIC is available as NT, OT, or both. Yes, it is more expensive than Word, but IMO it is better and much more conservative in general—but like I said, quality varies in both sets.

BTW—I do own—and use—both sets

Posts 1647
Rick | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Dec 8 2013 12:40 PM

Ken and Jack. Thanks for the responses thus far. I edited my OP to include both of the New and Old Testaments of the NIC.

My OP only included the NICNT. Sorry for the confusion.

Price really is not the issue right now since I plan on building my Logos credit over several months and am patient enough to wait until I get enough. Thanks again for the replies and any future recommendations!

Peace  Smile

Romans 14:19 (NRSV)
19 Let us then pursue what makes for peace and for mutual upbuilding.

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Jack Caviness | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Dec 8 2013 12:56 PM

BTW, are you aware that the Believers Church commentary set is Anabaptist? But it  does not have the in-depth coverage of NIC and Word.

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Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Dec 8 2013 1:01 PM

NICNT is definitely more suited to lay people with no academic training and/or knowledge of original languages. It is also more predictably in agreement with Evangelical views, which may not always be an asset, but will please anyone who wants just that. 

You may also want to consider the Tyndale Commentary series. It is way cheaper, conservative, smaller in size yet quite informative.

As for being an Anabaptist, this should not matter. These series are not denominational and, to the extent that it is believed that they deal with Scripture fairly, should be useful for anyone who wants to learn what the Bible says.

Posts 824
GregW | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Dec 8 2013 1:04 PM

Hi Rick - I have (and use) both sets in Logos. There are excellent commentaries in each series. I would personally go with NICOT/NICNT as the layout of them (IMHO) is better than the rather awkward way the content of the Word commentaries is arranged. They are, however, rather more expensive. You are fortunate in that both sets are now available volume-by-volume, so you could always buy one from each set, then get the whole set (Dynamic pricing certainly applies for WBC, and I'm sure Sales would give you the amount off for a NICOT/NICNT volume). You could also return the one from the series you chose not to go with and get your money back so long as you returned it in 30 days. I'm sure nobody at Logos would doubt the ethics of you doing so for such a significant purchase.  


Running Logos 6 Platinum and Logos Now on Surface Pro 4, 8 GB RAM, 256GB SSD, i5

Posts 1647
Rick | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Dec 8 2013 1:20 PM

Jack Caviness:
BTW, are you aware that the Believers Church commentary set is Anabaptist?

Yes, but as you noted, it really does not go deep enough for me when I want to dig deeper. I have found that it seldom goes into various opinions and uses something like "This is admittedly a difficult verse...." and gently brings the discussion to an end. I want to know exactly why it is a difficult verse  Big Smile

Peace  Smile

Romans 14:19 (NRSV)
19 Let us then pursue what makes for peace and for mutual upbuilding.

Posts 1647
Rick | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Dec 8 2013 1:23 PM

With your suggestions, it looks as if I should prepare to save enough for the New International Commentary. The use of non-transliterated Greek and Hebrew would hinder me, I am sure.

Maybe, I will purchase the NT first and then aim for the OT.

Thanks so much!

Peace  Smile

Romans 14:19 (NRSV)
19 Let us then pursue what makes for peace and for mutual upbuilding.

Posts 3937
abondservant | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Dec 8 2013 1:26 PM

Here is an excerpt from WBC that may help guide you. Just opened the volume and scrolled to the top of an article.





Outward vs. Inward Righteousness (6:1–18)




Almsgiving (6:1–4)

Bibliography
Betz, H. D. “A Jewish-Christian Cultic Didache in Matt. 6:1–18: Reflections and Questions on the Historical Jesus.” In Essays on the Sermon on the Mount. Philadelphia: Fortress, 1985. 55–69. Büchler, A. “St Matthew VI 1–6 and Other Allied Passages.” JTS 10 (1909) 266–70. Dietzfelbinger, C. “Die Frömmigkeitsregeln von Mt 6:1–18 als Zeugnisse frühchristlicher Geschichte.” ZNW 75 (1984) 184–200. George, A. “La justice à faire dans le secret (Matthieu 6,1–6 et 16–18).” Bib 40 (1959) 509–98. Gerhardsson, B. “Geistiger Opferdienst nach Matth 6,1–6.16–21.” In Neues Testament und Geschichte. FS O. Cullmann, ed. H. Baltensweiler and B. Reicke. Zürich: Theologischer, 1972. 69–77. Klostermann, E. “Zum Verständnis von Mt 6,2.” ZNW 47 (1956) 280–81. McEleney, N. J. “Does the Trumpet Sound or Resound? An Interpretation of Matthew 6,2.” ZNW 76 (1985) 43–46. Minear, P. S. “Keep It Secret.” In Commands of Christ. 47–68. Nagel, W. “Gerechtigkeit—oder Almosen? (Mt 6,1).” VC 15 (1961) 141–45. Oakley, I. J. W. “ ‘Hypocrisy’ in Matthew.” IBS 7 (1985) 118–38. Schweizer, E. “Der Jude im Verborgenen …, dessen Lob nicht von Menschen, sondern von Gott kommt.” In Matthäus und seine Gemeinde. 86–97.


Translation

  1“Be careful not to practice your pietya before others in order to be seen by them. Otherwise you have no reward with your heavenly Father. 2When you give alms, therefore, do not blow a trumpet to attract attentionb as do the hypocrites in the synagogues and in the streets, so that they may be glorified by others. Trulyc I say to you, they are having their reward at that moment. 3But as for you, when you give alms, do not let your left hand know what your right hand is doing, 4so that your almsgiving may be in secret. And your Father, who sees in secret, willd reward you.”e


Notes

a. δικαιοσύνην, lit. “righteousness.” The majority of (late) MSS (L W Z Θ f13 TR syp,h mae) have ἐλεημοσύνην, “almsgiving,” perhaps by the influence of v 2. א1 syc bo have δόσιν, “giving.”

b. ἔμπροσθέν σου, lit. “before you.”

c. א* and a few other late MSS insert a second ἀμήν, “truly.”

d. D W f1 TR syp, h add αὐτός before the verb, producing a slightly emphatic “he.”

e. A majority of late MSS (L W Θ TR it sys,p,h) add ἐν τῷ φανερῷ, “in the open,” as a counterbalance to ἐν τῷ κρυπτῷ, “in secret.” As Metzger points out, however, the superiority of the Father’s reward to human approval is important, not its public or nonpublic character (TCGNT, 15). Cf. Note e* on v 6.


Form/Structure/Setting

A. We now come to a new section of the sermon (6:1–18) devoted to three important exercises of the religious life (H. D. Betz refers to the passage as “a Jewish-Christian cultic Didache”): almsgiving (vv 2–4), prayer (vv 5–6), and fast ing (vv 16–18). These practices do not themselves come under criticism, nor are they regulated, but rather the motivation underlying them is scrutinized. The entire section is introduced by the general principle enunciated in v 1, a kĕlāl sentence, i.e., a form introducing the themes of the following section. The formal parallelism of the sections indicates that these three sections constitute one entity in the sermon despite the lengthy parenthetical section containing the Lord’s Prayer (vv 7–15).
B. These three main sections (vv 2–4, 5–6, 16–18) are without Synoptic parallels and, as their stylized form suggests, probably were derived as a unit from the special oral tradition available to the evangelist. Into the second member of this unit, however, the evangelist has inserted other traditional material having to do with prayer, including the Lord’s Prayer (vv 7–15). Only here do we encounter parallel Synoptic material. The traditional Jewish linking of the three items—almsgiving, prayer, and fasting—is found (but in reverse order) in POxy 654.5 (cf. Gos. Thom. 6).
C. The parallelism of the three sections is readily apparent from the verbatim recurrence of the words ἀμὴν λέγω ὑμῖν ἀπέχουσιν τὸν μισθὸν αὐτῶν, “truly I say to you, they have their reward” (vv 2, 5, and 16), as well as the repetition of the concluding formula, τῷ πατρί σου τῷ ἐν τῷ κρυπτῷ, “to your Father who is secret” (vv 6 and 18, but the latter has the synonym κρυφαίῳ for κρυπτῷ; v 4 has only the last three words ἐν τῷ κρυπτῷ, “in secret,” which are applied to the giving of alms rather than to the Father), followed by the sentence in verbatim agreement (except again for the use of κρυφαίῳ in v 18): καὶ ὁ πατήρ σου ὁ βλέπων ἐν τῷ κρυπτῷ ἀποδώσει σοι, “and your Father who sees in secret will reward you” (vv 4, 6, 18). In addition to these verbatim parallels, there is considerable similarity in the structure of the three passages. Each (i.e., vv 2–4; 5–6; 16–18) contains the following, with only slight variations: (1) an introductory ὅταν with the subjunctive, “whenever you …” (singular in v 2; plural in vv 5 and 16), followed by a negative imperative, “do not” (formed using successively the subjunctive, future indicative, and imperative moods), a ὡς clause “as (or like) the hypocrites,” and a ὅπως, “so that,” clause that describes the intent of the hypocrites; (2) the “they have their reward” saying in the present tense, addressed to a plural “you”; (3) a strongly adversative clause beginning with the words σὺ δέ, “but you” (always in the singular), in which the proper way to act is described, followed by a ὅπως, “so that,” clause (but lacking in v 6) emphasizing “in secret”; and (4) the concluding saying, introduced by the ἀμὴν λέγω ὑμῖν formula (“truly I say to you”): “your Father who sees in secret will reward you” (singular). For wordplay in a possible Aramaic tradition underlying the passage, see M. Black (Aramaic, 176–78). As an outline of the present pericope the following may be suggested: (1) a general warning about doing righteous deeds to be seen by others (v 1); (2) the specific example of almsgiving (v 2); and (3) the proper performance of almsgiving: “in secret” (vv 3–4).


Comment

1 The opening verse stands almost as a rubric over the entire passage of vv 1–18. The warning (προσέχετε, “beware,” “be careful”) here admonishes the readers to avoid performing their righteousness in order to be seen by others. The expression “to do righteousness” (δικαιοσύνην … ποιεῖν) is Hebraic (e.g., Gen 18:19; Ps 106:3; Isa 56:1) and is found also in the NT in 1 John 2:29; 3:7, 10; and Rev 22:11. The word δικαιοσύνη here is to be understood in the broad sense of “righteousness” (cf. 5:20), of which three basic aspects of Jewish piety (cf. Tob 12:8–10)—almsgiving, prayer, and fasting—are specific examples (on “righteousness,” see Comment on 3:15). Again, as in the antitheses (5:21–48), the supreme importance of motive or inner thought emerges. Although δικαιοσύνη can also mean “almsgiving” and thus some have tried to associate this verse with vv 2–4, the formal analysis (see above, Form/Structure/Setting §C) shows that v 1, rather than being a part of the section that follows, is better understood as an introduction to all three sections (vv 2–4; 5–6; 16–18). The deeds may be thought of as the Christian’s self-offering in “spiritual service” and may correspond to the demand of the Shema (Deut 6:4–5) to love God with all your heart (prayer), soul (fasting), and might (almsgiving), with the order changed to move from the easier to the harder (thus Gerhardsson). The phrase ἔμπροσθεν τῶν ἀνθρώπων, “before others,” is intensified by the following πρὸς τὸ θεαθῆναι αὐτοῖς, “to be seen by them.” This is an emphasis found in all three following sections: cf. ὅπως δοξασθῶσιν ὑπὸ τὼν ἀνθρώπων, “so that they might be glorified by others” (v 2); ὅπως φανῶσιν τοῖς ἀνθρώποις, “so that they might be seen by others” (in verbatim agreement in vv 5 and 16; cf. the corresponding negative ὅπως μὴ φανῇς τοῖς ἀνθρώποις, “so that you may not be seen by others,” in v 18). Those who do their righteous deeds in order to be observed by others are described as “hypocrites” (ὑποκριταί) in each of the three following sections (vv 2, 5, and 16). Matthew almost certainly has in mind the Pharisees, who are repeatedly described as “hypocrites” in chap. 23 and of whom it is also said (23:5) that “they do all their works” πρὸς τὸ θεαθῆναι τοῖς ἀνθρώποις, “to be seen by others”—almost exactly the same language as in the present passage.
If the disciples perform acts of righteousness “to be seen by others,” Jesus says to them, μισθὸν οὐκ ἔχετε παρὰ τῷ πατρὶ ὑμῶν τῷ ἐν τοῖς οὐρανοῖς, “you do not have a reward with your Father who is in heaven.” This anticipates the considerable stress on reward in the three following sections, in each of which Jesus says concerning those who display their piety “they have their reward” (vv 2, 5, and 16), and of those who practice their piety in secret that “your Father will reward you” (vv 4, 6, and 18). For the expression “your Father in heaven,” see 5:16. On μισθός, which occurs more often in Matthew than any other Gospel, see 5:12.
2 Here, “whenever you give alms” (ὅταν … ποιῇς ἐλεημοσύνην) is in the second person singular, unlike in the second and third sections where the “whenever” clause is addressed to the second person plural (vv 5 and 16). The words ποιεῖν ἐλεημοσύνην (also in v 3) mean literally “to do an act of mercy,” but by the intertestamental period they had become a technical expression for almsgiving (cf. Tob 1:3, 16; 4:7–8; Sir 7:10; in the NT, see Acts 9:36; 10:2; 24:17). Performing deeds of mercy, or doing kindness, was one of the pillars of Judaism (m. ˒Abot 1:2). It is difficult to know whether the reference to blowing a trumpet is intended literally or metaphorically.

  Luz denies rather strongly that a trumpet was actually blown at the giving of a major gift, taking the words as a metaphor of irony (so too, Gnilka; Gundry; Guelich, Sermon; France; Davies-Allison are somewhat less confident in their denial). It is still possible—despite the lack of solid evidence—that a trumpet was blown to draw attention to very large gifts (thus Schlatter; Bonnard; Hill), in order perhaps to encourage others to do similarly; on the other hand, perhaps the association was made because trumpets were blown at fasts (see Büchler), at a time when large gifts were given to avert disaster (see G. Friedrich, TDNT 7:87–88). Or perhaps the sound is that of coins being thrown into the six trumpet-shaped money chests placed in the temple specifically for the collection of alms (the “Shofar-chests” of m. Šeqal. 2:1; see Danby’s note [The Mishnah] on that text) in order to attract the attention of others (so McEleney). The point, in any case, is clear: the hypocrites did all they could to draw attention to their generosity.

The sense in which these persons are ὑποκριταί, “hypocrites,” is that their real motivation in their apparently pious conduct is self-glorification (ὅπως δοξασθῶσιν ὑπὸ τῶν ἀνθρώπων, “so that they might be glorified by others”) ἐν ταῖς συναγωγαῖς καὶ ἐν ταῖς ῥύμαις, “in the synagogues and in the streets,” i.e., in the places of worship and in public (cf. the similar phrase in v 5).

  The word ὑποκριτής in Hellenistic Greek commonly meant “actor,” i.e., one who performs in front of others, pretending to be something he or she is not. In the NT it is used consistently in a negative sense. Matthew captures the duplicity inherent in hypocrisy when he juxtaposes the word with the quotation of Isa 29:13, “this people honors me with their lips, but their heart is far from me” (15:8). In addition to the three references in this section of Matthew (vv 2, 5, 16), the word occurs in 7:5; 15:7; 22:18; and 24:51. Note especially too the six occurrences in chap. 23, directed against the Pharisees, 23:13, 15, 23, 25, 27, 29. See U. Wilckens, TDNT 8:559–71.

The response of Jesus to this self-glorifying activity is introduced with the formula of emphasis: ἀμὴν λέγω ὑμῖν, “truly I say to you [plural]” (cf. vv 5 and 16). This formula, which previously occurred in 5:18 and 26, is found some thirty-two times in Matthew, more than twice as often as in any other Gospel. The use of the present tense in ἀπέχουσιν τὸν μισθὸν αὐτῶν, “they are having their reward,” implies that this temporary praise from others is all the reward they will receive, in deliberate contrast to the statement at the end of each of the three sections that promises a future, eschatological reward (vv 4, 6, 18). In the rabbinic doctrine concerning rewards, almsgiving is promised a high return (see Str-B 4:552–53). Jesus’ remark that those who give alms for the praise of others already have their reward must have had a shocking effect on his hearers.
3–4 In the strong adversative sentence, Jesus says to the disciples (“when you [here and in all three applications in the singular] give alms”) that almsgiving must not be an act done to draw the attention and admiration of others (for Jewish parallels, cf. Str-B 1:391–92). Far from almsgivers calling attention to their act, they should do so unself-consciously, with the left hand taking no heed of what the right hand does (cf. Gos. Thom. 62). The speculation that the left hand stands for one’s best friend, as in a contemporary Arabic proverb (Grundmann), is hardly convincing; the same must be said for Gundry’s suggestion that giving with one and not two hands indicates unobtrusive giving.
Jesus emphasizes, “so that” (ὅπως), the disciple’s almsgiving must be ἐν τῷ κρυπτῷ, “in secret.” This is the point of the pericope and of all three sections. Righteous deeds are to be done in secret, beyond the attention of any onlookers. These deeds will not escape the attention of God (cf. 1 Sam 16:7): “your Father who sees in secret [ὁ πατήρ σου ὁ βλέπων ἐν τῷ κρυπτῷ] will reward [ἀποδώσει] you.” Schweizer (“Der Jude”) finds a direct connection between this teaching and Paul’s reference in Rom 2:28–29 to being a Jew ἐν τῷ κρυπτῷ, “in secret.” The reward motif is more important in Matthew than in any other Gospel (see Comment on 5:12). On ἀποδιδόναι, the verb underlying “to reward” in this verse (and vv 6, 18), see especially 16:27 and 20:8.


Explanation

The sermon has been concerned thus far with the defining of true righteousness by a correct understanding of the law. Now specific deeds of piety come into the picture of true righteousness. The practice of righteous deeds—here specifically almsgiving—in order to capture the attention and admiration of others cancels the possibility of any reward from God. The only reward such deeds receive is in the momentary applause of the onlookers. “They were not giving, but buying. They wanted the praise of men, they paid for it” (Davies-Allison, 1:582). True deeds of righteousness, by contrast, are done “in secret” where only God, “who sees in secret,” knows of them. The deeds of righteousness performed by the Christian will of course be seen by others. According to 5:16, followers of Jesus should let their light shine “before others [precisely the language of our pericope], so that they may see your good works.” Although this may seem at first to be a contradiction, 5:16 goes on to say “that they might glorify your Father who is in heaven,” which is in bold contrast to the desire of the hypocrites that “they might be glorified by others” (v 2). Only deeds done for God’s glory will receive an eschatological reward. This stress is in keeping with the emphasis on the inner obedience to God’s commandments, which we encountered in chap. 5. God is concerned with the heart, with the motivation behind a person’s deeds, as much as with the external deeds themselves. The application of the passage is clear and timeless in its bearing upon Christians.


Donald A. Hagner, Matthew 1–13, vol. 33A, Word Biblical Commentary (Dallas: Word, Incorporated, 1998), 136–141.

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Posts 1647
Rick | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Dec 8 2013 1:42 PM

abondservant:
Here is an excerpt from WBC that may help guide you.

Wow! Thanks so much, it was very kind of you.

If this is the average technicality of the series, I believe that WBC would be difficult for me and it is probably not the right choice for me. I can however, see where it would be extremely useful for those who are better trained than me though. Thanks again.

Peace  Smile

Romans 14:19 (NRSV)
19 Let us then pursue what makes for peace and for mutual upbuilding.

Posts 3937
abondservant | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Dec 8 2013 1:44 PM

Rick:

abondservant:
Here is an excerpt from WBC that may help guide you.

Wow! Thanks so much, it was very kind of you.

If this is the average technicality of the series, I believe that WBC would be difficult for me and it is probably not the right choice for me. I can however, see where it would be extremely useful for those who are better trained than me though. Thanks again.



I only have the one title, and have only read a few articles related to something specific I was working on at the time, so I can't speak to the averageness of this article :)

Happy to have helped!

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David Wilson | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Dec 8 2013 2:09 PM

Perhaps try something outside of this "box" of NICNT or WBC.

Consider EEC for a moment and if this one seems to be aligned to your interests and needs then try renting the current volumes for a month to get a better feel for whether the series would be a good buy. Only seven volumes available so far: expect the cost of a rental or subscription to rise as more volumes are released.  If you pay for the whole set, you get what is currently released and you get all subsequent volumes as they are released over the next few years.

https://www.logos.com/product/35585/evangelical-exegetical-commentary-rental

https://www.logos.com/product/7565/evangelical-exegetical-commentary

http://evangelicalexegeticalcommentary.com/about/ 

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Scott S | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Dec 8 2013 2:27 PM

Rick,

Extensive previews of NICNT and NICOT volumes are available.  I recommend that you check these to see if they see if they meet your needs. (I have not checked if all the links still work.)

NICOT and NICNT Previews

Here are the links from Matt's original post on the NICNT:

The Book of Revelation (Robert Mounce)

Posts 2465
Lee | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Dec 8 2013 2:36 PM

Rick:

  • When scripture is practiced and applied in more than one way, I would like a commentary that covers as many of them as possible.

 

Both series are on the technical side. http://bestcommentaries.com has a lot of information that could be of help to you.

Posts 85
Armwood | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 9 2013 3:05 AM
RICK have you look at the option of renting. Say you wanted to study Matthew, you could rent Matthew in the WBC and the NICNT and if you like one over the other, That book in that series you could pay for and the other SIMPLE not rent again.

Armwood

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Graham Criddle | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 9 2013 4:07 AM

Armwood:
RICK have you look at the option of renting. Say you wanted to study Matthew, you could rent Matthew in the WBC and the NICNT and if you like one over the other, That book in that series you could pay for and the other SIMPLE not rent again.

I wasn't aware renting was available on these series - can you advise where you have seen this?

Thanks, Graham 

Posts 1647
Rick | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 9 2013 4:24 AM

The response has been nothing short of amazing. I truly appreciate everyone's input as I prepare to make a large investment. As of right now, it looks as if I'll probably go with the New International Commentary.

I really like how Logos is offering the New Testament broken down into the Gospels, Epistles, General Epistles etc.. allowing me to build more slowly, albeit a bit more expensive, manner if I do decide that I want some sooner than later. Thanks again everyone.

David J. Wilson:
Consider EEC for a moment and if this one seems to be aligned to your interests and needs then try renting the current volumes for a month to get a better feel for whether the series would be a good buy.

Thanks for the reminder David. I had forgotten about this series being in development. I will take your advice and consider the collection. My apprehensiveness is that it is still being written and I would rather wait to see the finished product before investing.

Scott S:
Extensive previews of NICNT and NICOT volumes are available.

Fantastic! I took a quick look and will look again very shortly. They definitely look readable for me even though they are technical. Thanks for the links.

Lee:
Both series are on the technical side.

After looking at Scott's links above, I see that they are both pretty technical. I wish that they both had the original and transliterated languages but this is not a biggie since I have Logos. Yes

From  the short previews that I looked at the New International does appear to be more readable and enjoyable than the WBC for someone of my background.

Best Commentaries seems to like it too.

Armwood:
RICK have you look at the option of renting.

Like Graham, unfortunately, I don't see an option to rent either set. Sad

Peace  Smile

Romans 14:19 (NRSV)
19 Let us then pursue what makes for peace and for mutual upbuilding.

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Jack Caviness | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 9 2013 6:45 AM

Rick:

Jack Caviness:
BTW, are you aware that the Believers Church commentary set is Anabaptist?

Yes, but as you noted, it really does not go deep enough for me when I want to dig deeper. I have found that it seldom goes into various opinions and uses something like "This is admittedly a difficult verse...." and gently brings the discussion to an end. I want to know exactly why it is a difficult verse  Big Smile

That is a most commendable attitude. Too bad everyone doesn't take that approach.

Posts 85
Armwood | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 9 2013 7:01 AM
Thanks Graham seeing that I own both these series, I did not look to see if they were being offered for rentals. these and other Great book that buyers are having to decide which to purchase would really be helpful if they were offered. again thanks Graham

Armwood

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