Bible software companies should consider UltraViolet model

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JT (alabama24) | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jan 25 2014 5:12 AM

Sogol:

I ran this for a bunch of my DVDs tonight. Of the 73 DVDs I tried out, 47 were successful, 22 were not presently available in UltraViolet, and the system was unable to identify 4 of my DVDs. That's a 64% success rate, but most of the DVDs that didn't work were either non-mainstream movies or Disney films (I believe that Disney is the only major studio to hold out on UltraViolet participation).

I am very busy right now and probably won't have the time before the 31st... Tongue Tied

Sogol:

Once again, I still think the UltraViolet model for "Digital Lockers" is a great system. It would be awesome if this also came to music and eBooks.... and Bible software content too, of course! :)

For clarification: what do you mean by the UV 'model'? How would it apply to Logos?

  1. To be completely honest, I am a bit confused by UV. I could care less about any movies in UV format. I want them in my iTunes library... Otherwise the movies are worthless to me. UV has no connection to adding movies to iTunes, does it? If not, then how does this model apply to Logos? 
  2. To be clear again: however UV works, it has the blessing of the copyright holders. They aren't illegally selling discounted movies, nor are they giving them away from the "goodness of their hearts." They are trying to make money and the believe they have a model to do so. 
  3. one last thing: UV might be an organization tied to the movie houses (I have no idea if they are). If this is true, it further distances this "model" from anything related to Logos. [Hulu is a similar company, which is owned by some networks... I can't watch 'Hulu' shows on netflix, which has a much nicer interface on my device]

FWIW- I am very glad for "iTunes Match." I pay $25 a year for cloud access to music I did not purchase from iTunes. All things equal, I buy from iTunes. When Amazon does a loss leader on an album for $2-5, I buy it there and access it in iTunes. It's great. Smile I would love to buy a $1.99 kindle deal and get the Logos copy free (Or at a significant discount,), but I don't see anything to point me to this ever being a real possibility. 

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Sogol | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jan 27 2014 3:56 PM

alabama24:

Sogol:

I ran this for a bunch of my DVDs tonight. Of the 73 DVDs I tried out, 47 were successful, 22 were not presently available in UltraViolet, and the system was unable to identify 4 of my DVDs. That's a 64% success rate, but most of the DVDs that didn't work were either non-mainstream movies or Disney films (I believe that Disney is the only major studio to hold out on UltraViolet participation).

I am very busy right now and probably won't have the time before the 31st... Tongue Tied

Sogol:

Once again, I still think the UltraViolet model for "Digital Lockers" is a great system. It would be awesome if this also came to music and eBooks.... and Bible software content too, of course! :)

For clarification: what do you mean by the UV 'model'? How would it apply to Logos?

  1. To be completely honest, I am a bit confused by UV. I could care less about any movies in UV format. I want them in my iTunes library... Otherwise the movies are worthless to me. UV has no connection to adding movies to iTunes, does it? If not, then how does this model apply to Logos? 
  2. To be clear again: however UV works, it has the blessing of the copyright holders. They aren't illegally selling discounted movies, nor are they giving them away from the "goodness of their hearts." They are trying to make money and the believe they have a model to do so. 
  3. one last thing: UV might be an organization tied to the movie houses (I have no idea if they are). If this is true, it further distances this "model" from anything related to Logos. [Hulu is a similar company, which is owned by some networks... I can't watch 'Hulu' shows on netflix, which has a much nicer interface on my device]

FWIW- I am very glad for "iTunes Match." I pay $25 a year for cloud access to music I did not purchase from iTunes. All things equal, I buy from iTunes. When Amazon does a loss leader on an album for $2-5, I buy it there and access it in iTunes. It's great. Smile I would love to buy a $1.99 kindle deal and get the Logos copy free (Or at a significant discount,), but I don't see anything to point me to this ever being a real possibility. 

In a nutshell, what I am referring to as "the UV Model" is a just a more advanced way to manage the digital media assets a consumer owns, whether they be books, movies, music or video games.

What this model does it to essentially "unbundle" the digital rights to content from the digital rights of delivery platforms.

Why is this necessary? Primarily because the digital content we own is tied to individual content delivery platforms, yet the content delivery platforms we prefer have changed and continue to change so quickly. Thus if consumers want to maintain the value of the digital content they own, they are forced to make a very long-term bet on which content delivery platforms will be the best in the long-run. However, none of us really have much certainty as to which will be the best in the long-run, and for all we know, the best ones in the long-run may not even exist yet! 

For example, let's look at digital books. At the moment, there are a handful of mainstream ways we can buy digital books. There's Amazon (Kindle), Apple (iBooks), Barnes & Noble (Nook), Google (Play), and maybe Adobe Digital Editions from the publisher (I'm sure there's others too, but let's go with these). If I want to keep the long-term value of my digital book library intact, then before buying any digital books I have to make a long-term bet on which platform(s) will succeed and thrive over time, because the digital books I buy are tied to whichever of the platforms I buy them on.

At the moment, Amazon looks like a good long-term bet, but there's no guarantee they'll stay in the lead. Google and Apple are strong companies overall, but both are a bit weaker in this specific space (and Google has a history of bailing out of businesses that aren't thriving). Barnes and Noble's Nook looks somewhat weak, but they could end up getting acquired by a larger player (I believe Microsoft already has an investment in them). And though Adobe Digital Editions doesn't have too much, some of the more academic publishers I like only make their content available through this platform. And who know's what new players will get into the space in the future to give the legacy players a run for their money?

What I'm saying is that if book publishers could cooperate on this, just as the movie studios have done with UltraViolet, consumers wouldn't have to bet on which is the best delivery platform in the long-run. They would only have to purchase the license to the digital content once, but could then access it on whichever delivery platforms they wanted in the future (probably for an additional fee, but that fee would be much less than the cost of buying a whole new license for full price).

Would this work for the Bible software space? It's hard to say if you could get everyone to work together on it, but I think it makes a ton of sense and would provide a huge benefit for end-users. And if the secular media companies, which are both much bigger and notoriously vicious with each other, could cooperate together on UltraViolet, I don't know why it should be unthinkable for the Bible software companies and Christian publishers to cooperate on doing something similar. And though most of the decision lies with the publishers to make something like this work, Logos would be an extremely important player in it all since they are the leading delivery platform for digital Bible content.

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Sogol | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jan 27 2014 4:30 PM

And one more thing.......

Why would the publishers and content delivery platforms want to go along with something like this? Doesn't it seem like most of the benefit accrues to the end-users?

In the short-run, this may look like the case. However, the current system is less competitive and provides less consumers to end-users.

If history is any guide, technologies that increase the freedom of users and promote competition win in the long-run.

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Matthew C Jones | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jan 27 2014 4:33 PM

Sogol:
Would this work for the Bible software space? It's hard to say if you could get everyone to work together on it, but I think it makes a ton of sense and would provide a huge benefit for end-users. And if the secular media companies, which are both much bigger and notoriously vicious with each other, could cooperate together on UltraViolet, I don't know why it should be unthinkable for the Bible software companies and Christian publishers to cooperate on doing something similar. And though most of the decision lies with the publishers to make something like this work, Logos would be an extremely important player in it all since they are the leading delivery platform for digital Bible content.

Here is why it is never gonna happen:

  • Under the present system the publishers make more money
  • Under the present system the platforms make more money
  • Presently there are not enough users migrating  to new platforms
  • The Logos users are generally very happy with their choice of platform
  • The non-Logos users are not willing to pay for the Logos platform
  • Finally, it is all about the money.

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